2.5mm Allen key
  • 2.5mm Allen key

  • Needle-nose pliers

Add Comment

X-carriage
  • X-carriage

  • X-end-motor

  • X-end-idler

  • Some parts can slightly differ from the photos.

Add Comment

LM8UU linear bearings 8mm smooth rods (the longest ones) Carefully slide linear bearings on rods.
  • LM8UU linear bearings

  • 8mm smooth rods (the longest ones)

  • Carefully slide linear bearings on rods.

This is the only part of the guide that doesn't specify the rod length. This is not a major issue, but it is nice to be consistent.

James Slater - Reply

My printed manual says "8mm smooth rods (the longest ones)", as does the text here.

Andreas Kjærgaard - Reply

The rods for my original printer were scored by the amount of use I put it through. I bought new smooth rods and saved the longest ones for this step. Clearly they are too long. Can we get the correct length added?

Solomon Chambers - Reply

Re-using the scored ones, they're the correct length. Measured with a ruler they appear to be 370mm.

Solomon Chambers - Reply

orientation of the ball bearing is a key factor in assembling Y-axis, here it just says "Carefully slide linear bearings on rods.", is it just me or orientation doesn't matter here?

Aleksey Bykov - Reply

What is the length of the longest one?

Ahmed Elahmedy Alnahrawy - Reply

Insert LM8UU linear bearing into the printed parts (X-end-motor and X-end-idler) as shown in the pictures. The bearing should be in line with the X-ends as highlighted in the picture. You can press on the flat surface for easier insertion.
  • Insert LM8UU linear bearing into the printed parts (X-end-motor and X-end-idler) as shown in the pictures.

  • The bearing should be in line with the X-ends as highlighted in the picture.

  • You can press on the flat surface for easier insertion.

  • Place two bearings in a way that the inner balls of the second bearing are rotated 45° compared to the first. This way you will achieve greater contact with the smooth rod. See third picture for more details.

I thought I had broken this part while trying to get the bearings in. The tiny piece connecting the gap in the cylinder is apparently supposed to break (according to support). I finally got these in by using the screw driver to carefully pry the cylinder open and pushed the bearings in. Phew.

Perplumblewintz Jonz - Reply

It is really difficult to get these bearings in. I finally used a screwdriver to open the holes a bit , but even then it was very difficult and the tension on the material is in my opinion too much. The hole should be a fraction wider. On the first one I cracked 2 mm from the end. Continuing carefully I manage to get them in easier with the screw driver but when the bearing was inside the X-end-idler I noticed a crack in the filament half way the bearing. Another part that needs replacement sometime as it can impact the alignment of the bearings.

Jurgen B - Reply

in this case i agree, the shaft holes on the x end motor and x end idler printer parts are a little too narrow, increasing diameter by a even 1 or 2 mm may make the insertion process easier.

Rohin Koshi -

I found that when inserting the bearings into the end that sat on the original print bed when the part was printed, there was extra material that made the hole too tight. I simply used a bit of sandpaper to quickly ream out the edge and it worked super smooth after.

Babak - Reply

No real issues for me to insert the bearings. I suspect the tolerances have been increased as per the comments.

Ian Scensor - Reply

Yes. We're still improving :) :D

Josef Prusa -

Kit I rec'd in Mid-Dec 2016 seems to be about perfect; at first bearings did not act like they'd behave, but after doing what I'd done before, and reading the comments BEFORE doing anything stupid or permanent, went right in with just a little kind of screwing it in to the right and pushing just a bit more than gently. So far this one seems MUCH easier than doing the Y axis...

Craig Caudle -

The reason on mine that the holes were too small is that there was a lip around the hole on the face that was sitting on the printer table when it was printed. I used a deburring tool to get rid of the lip and the bearings slipped right in. Running sandpaper around the inside of edge of the hole to remove the lip would also work.

Sven - Reply

The bearings when in just right-not too tight, not too loose. However, on my X-Carriage, there was just a small lip on the inside of the cylinder hole as discovered by Sven (8/29/2016 comment). It's very small and easy to scrape away, and once gone, the bearing slipped in the same as the others. This small lip didn't exist on the X-end Idler part.

Kevin Hawke -

Everything fit perfectly for me - just the right amount of tightness. Be sure to press fit the bearings against a flat surface (tabletop) to seat them flush with the edge of the printed parts.

Anthony - Reply

bearings fit, required firm press against the table.

Frank Hubbard - Reply

Sliding a rod through both bearings in the X-end-idler is smooth. For the X-end-motor part, the bearings apparently do not align well. Sliding a rod through each bearing is smooth. Sliding a rod through both bearings is very rough. Placing the bearing in the top end of this part was very difficult but it eventually went in, flush with the top edge. I do not believe I can continue this build until I resolve this issue.

Chuck Vanzant - Reply

You'll notice a tiny support still connected on the top. I couldn't insert the bearing. Inserted it by putting the first bearing in the bottom. That broke the support - then was able to press one in from the top.

Timothy Lee Russell - Reply

if you are having trouble getting the bearing into place take a utility knife and carefully cut a 45 degree chamfer on both ends were the bearings are inserted. Once started and square press down on a solid flat surface. These bearing holes can be printed with a lead in angle making the bearings easier to install

Carl W Swanson - Reply

Hey Josef and everyone else, I documented my experience with figuring out how to build this and put it into separate videos for each chapter. I'll post the appropriate video links in the comments as I think this could help others if they get stuck, and it can help Josef get an understanding of what went well and what did not for a complete rookie with no knowledge of 3D printing during the assembly.

Chapter 3: X-axis assembly

https://youtu.be/wa4Us6Och4c

Enjoy!

Darian Grant - Reply

Actually, here is the link to the exact step in the chapter:

https://youtu.be/wa4Us6Och4c?t=3m36s

Darian Grant -

I tried to get the orientation of the ball 'lines' in 45° angle to get as less as possible movement on the z-smooth-rods. Each LM8UU has 4 lines of balls, so i pressed the upper one like a plus '+' (ball lines aligned to x and y axis) and the lower one as a 'x' (ball lines in 45° angle to x and y axis). Placing them '+' and 'x' i got no play on the z smooth rods.

Waldemar - Reply

Insert M3nS square nuts (2 pcs) and put in place M3x10  screws (2 pcs). Avoid overtightening of the screws.
  • Insert M3nS square nuts (2 pcs) and put in place M3x10 screws (2 pcs).

  • Avoid overtightening of the screws.

in this case, the square nuts were too large for the traps.. so i had to use the M3n hex nut instead by lightly hammering it and using the screwdriver to drive it to the center of the trap hole location.

Rohin Koshi - Reply

There are reports of these screws being too short for the job (see http://shop.prusa3d.com/forum/original-p...). If you have spare m3x16, it may be a good mod when you'll come to tighten the belt later.

David Moreau - Reply

Not sure if they are long enough as per the comment by David, but as to Robin's comment by December it slid right in and no hammer needed. Now, what it is FOR I coudl not begin to guess, but I am sure all will be revealed later :)

Craig Caudle - Reply

Insert the rods with bearings fully into the printed parts. Ensure the correct orientation of the parts and rods (rod with 2 bearings must be on the side with the nut trap).
  • Insert the rods with bearings fully into the printed parts.

  • Ensure the correct orientation of the parts and rods (rod with 2 bearings must be on the side with the nut trap).

  • Insert the rods very carefully. Do not tilt the rods too much.

Make sure to clear out any bits of filament that may be inside the rod holes. Wiggle the included screwdriver around in there until all the debris comes free.

There was a good amount of filament shavings inside mine that would have prevented the rods from going all the way into the holes.

BC - Reply

It should be noted here what the expected distance is for the exposed rods. I didn't push mine all the way in -- though I pushed until they seemed to stop -- and later when this part gets attached to the z-axis rods I ended up losing some bearing balls out of my linear bearings.

My measurements have it at 306 mm (after pushing them close enough to get the right distance between the z-axis motor ends), but please double-check this.

Kevin Damm - Reply

my x-end-motor piece had every hole small. I had to file a lot for putting every screw and after enlarging the 8mm holes for the rods, some cracks appeared alongside both rods. would the cracks be critical? can I fix with acetone or something? is there any warranty on it?

Leonardo Helman - Reply

December edition was nicely drillcleared in holes. Nice improvment.

Andreas Engkvist - Reply

+1. my version too had perfect sized holes for the rods. They slipped right in,

Kevin Hawke -

Would like to see measurements of rods, some dimensions to verify correct assembly. Would be a bonus to have some tolerance range indicated.

Frank Hubbard - Reply

On a recent kit, this appears to not be an issue. Slipped in cleanly.

Timothy Lee Russell - Reply

A small tap with a small hammer and they went in smooth.

Charles - Reply

Perfect fit to slide in the rods in my kit from late Feb.

Kevin Smith - Reply

M3x18 screw (1 pc) 623h bearing with housing (1 pc) M3nN nylock nut (1 pc)
  • M3x18 screw (1 pc)

  • 623h bearing with housing (1 pc)

  • M3nN nylock nut (1 pc)

  • Insert the 623h bearing into the X-end idler.

  • Secure it in position using M3x18 screw.

  • Tighten it with M3 nylock nut, but the idler (wheel) must rotate freely!

the orientation of the 623h bearing with housing does not matter.

the x-axis belt just needs to roll over it. the belt can roll over it in either orientation.

daniel watson - Reply

the nut on the backside has a corresponding hexagon hole in the plastic to slide into. me and my student found it easiest to: put the m3x18 screw through the hole and tighten the nut onto it a few turns, then position the nut to align with the hexagon hole, then flip it over so the nut is on the table and press the plastic down onto it. after that, the nut was snugly in the hole and we tightened the screw a few more turns.

daniel watson - Reply

That method works perfectly

Keith Mizen -

Printed parts are very low quality, having lines missing in the part thus not allowing to tighten the screw even a little bit as the part bends easily :(

Danny Schwartz - Reply

I did not have Danny's issue, all my stuff seems quite good so far. A little blurb about how tight to tighten this thing would be good; I did it so far the wheel would not rotate at first, then backed off. I am guessing we want this free-spinning.

Craig Caudle - Reply

+1 to Craig's observation. I had the same problem - I tightened the screw too much and it prevented the bearing from turning. I backed it off until it was free-spinning.

Kevin Hawke -

+1: should be explain to check that pulley is rolling free. No space enough if you tighten. Had to remove the X-axis because I had no space enough to pull a tool for M3 nut.

Thierry Paché -

gently tighten cz u could break the idler ... I cracked mine but still works ... anyway to get stl files for that ?

hasan - Reply

Fit is ok, the hex nut is tricky to start in hole. It would be good to specify the gap ( end play ) between the bearing and the housing. I used approximately 0.008" ( 8 1/1000 inch ).

Frank Hubbard - Reply

I think I'm used to putting together molded parts but 3d parts really seem different in texture and response to pressure. I find myself over torquing the screws if I try to work by feel. Interesting. This is my first 3d printer build so I'm a noob. Super fun so far -- about 5 hours in...

Timothy Lee Russell - Reply

I had a problem in that the side of the printed part was rubbing against the side of the bearing. I used 4 washers to space it away from the side of the printed part.

Jody Crow - Reply

I feel that the 18mm screw could be shorter. It's ends up being fine once the z frame is assembled, but it scratched my frame in the process of putting it together.

Trevor Vannoy - Reply

I recommend moiving this to step 6 before the rod assembly. It's just a bit easier that way.

Jason T. Powell - Reply

It's a good idea to add a bit of lubricant to the sides of the bearing before inserting it into the idler enclosure. I had to do this after my printer was fully assembled (when it's much harder to add lubricant) because the sides of the bearing were rubbing against the plastic enclosure which caused some very annoying squeaking.

mechaMecha - Reply

Insert zipties into the X-carriage as shown in the picture. Ensure the correct orientation of zipties.
  • Insert zipties into the X-carriage as shown in the picture.

  • Ensure the correct orientation of zipties.

Add Comment

Place the X-carriage on the X-axis base as shown in the picture.
  • Place the X-carriage on the X-axis base as shown in the picture.

  • Ensure the correct orientation of X-carriage. Compared to previous steps the X-carriage is turned over!

image here incorrectly shows the M3nN nut already placed in trap as of 6/10/2016 (nut not placed yet (is placed too early) happens in a later step).

Rohin Koshi - Reply

This picture has the idler installed, but that isn't actually until step 11.

Kevin Damm - Reply

Steps rearranged, now it's consistent. Thanks for pointing out!

Josef Prusa - Reply

step 8 and step 9 show different orientation off zip ties. (the lower two)

william utriainen - Reply

I second william utrianiens comment. in step 9 the orientation of the 2 zipties is incorrect.

Joakim Lindholm - Reply

Thanks for noticing that! We'll update it.

Josef Prusa -

I ended up having an X-Carriage part in my kit that's tolerances were off about 2mm, causing my rods to bow out when I secured it with the zip ties. Luckily I was able to print a new one, albeit not in that lovely orange color.

Anthony E - Reply

Use pliers to tighten the zipties. Make sure that bearings are in the position as shown in the picture (bearing should be as deep in carriage as possible).
  • Use pliers to tighten the zipties.

  • Make sure that bearings are in the position as shown in the picture (bearing should be as deep in carriage as possible).

Pictures show the two bearings side-by-side with no gap between them, but the recess where they sit has room on the ends. If you slide the bearings apart, there is a 2 mm gap between them. The zip ties seem to place better and evenly on the bearings when there is a gap between them.

The single bearing has no slack or lee-way. It sits perfectly in the recess.

Kevin Hawke - Reply

Is it okay if I can twist the zipties a little bit after tightnening? Can't seem to manage tightening them extremely for fear of bending the rods.

Maarten Knapen - Reply

I use the small screwdriver (provided) to help. I use the long flat edge (side) of the tip (not the sharp end) to push down on the "head" of the zip tip while I pull the zip tie with the pliers. It seems easy to get a couple extra clicks of tightness this way.

Kevin Costen -

Use pliers to cut off any excess ziptie.
  • Use pliers to cut off any excess ziptie.

  • Move the ziptie head to the position as shown in the picture.

I did find at this point that getting a small pair of wire clippers makes for a much nicer cleanup of the zip ties.

Chris Yahnker - Reply

M3x18 screw (3 pcs) X motor (the one labeled with X axis)
  • M3x18 screw (3 pcs)

  • X motor (the one labeled with X axis)

  • Tighten the motor to the X-end-motor part.

  • Ensure the correct position of cables (Cables should face down).

Add Comment

Place GT2-16 pulley on the X motor shaft. Adjust the position as seen in the picture (effective part of the pulley should be in axis with the X-end-motor cutout and one of the screws on pulley should face directly on the pad on shaft).
  • Place GT2-16 pulley on the X motor shaft.

  • Adjust the position as seen in the picture (effective part of the pulley should be in axis with the X-end-motor cutout and one of the screws on pulley should face directly on the pad on shaft).

  • Tighten up the pulley.

I had forgotten to tighten the Pulley after placing on the Stepper motor, hence the XYZ calibration would fail on the 4/4 point cal. procedure.

This can be frustrating until I realized it was the X axis slipping, you cannot get a good calibration.

After tightening, of course, the calibration was successful...

SO.... be sure to check all your Pulleys are tight at the end of your build.....

Chuck Terra - Reply

The manual could stand a tweak here for those of us not as technical as Mr. Prusa - the shaft has a flat part I did not notice on the Y axis part, that one of the 2 tightening screws is supposed to go down on. Had to go back to Y axis and correct my mistake from that counterpart.

Craig Caudle - Reply

The shaft of motor X had a diameter that was a little too big. The pulley component GT2-16 could not be pushed in. However, the same pulley component could fit onto the shafts of other motors. I think it was a quality control issue that the shaft of motor X was just that little big thicker in my kit. I had to file the shaft to a slightly smaller diameter before I could push GT2-16 onto shaft of motor X.

Kelvin Kwok - Reply

Note the orientation of the motor, the cables are on the same side as the endstop mount

David Hayes - Reply

About the shaft being too large - double check that one of the set screws hadn't screwed in a bit that stops the pulley from going all the way in. A simple thing but easy to overlook.

Earl Dabney - Reply

Here is the link to the exact step in a video I made in case it helps:

https://youtu.be/wa4Us6Och4c?t=19m38s

Darian Grant - Reply

Note the orientation of the pulley - screws outboard, away from the motor. If you install it the other way around, the belt will rub against the slot next to it later. Don't ask me how I know that.

Kemp Brown - Reply

X-endstop
  • X-endstop

  • M2x12 screws (2 pcs)

  • Place the endstop on the printed part and insert M2x12 screws.

  • Ensure correct position as in the picture (The button on the endstop has to be aligned with the key on the X-end-motor part).

  • Don't tighten the screws of endstop completely. We will get to that later.

The screw holes in my X-end motor printed part were too tight to get the screw in, and especially hard to drive the screws while the X-endstop was covering the holes. What I did was carve into the holes with a sharp-tipped knife (rotating evenly so as not to move the hole's center). Once the opening was just about big enough for the M2x12 screws, I drove them by themselves to get a starter hole, then removed them and fastened the X-endstop.

The plastic will give a little and make room for the screw once it gets started, but you may have to widen the hole to give them enough room to get started.

Kevin Damm - Reply

The holes for the end stop in my kit were also too small in diameter. I used a 1/16 inch drill bit (I don't have any metric drill bits) to open the hole up to engage the screw threads. If you take this route, just be sure not to drill past the depth of the existing hole. Also be sure to keep the drill straight while drilling (don't go in at an angle).

Daniel C - Reply

I comfirm that the holes are too small (kit received end of july). I didn't have a screwdriver so I used Kevin's instructions and they worked like a charm. I hope that this will be fixed in the future.

Trak Johnson - Reply

Hole diameter is still too narrow as of a kit shipped on 1 September 2016

John O'Shaughnessy - Reply

Seems to be good in December 2016 kit

David Hayes -

My kit seems to have this corrected. The holes are small, but a little pressure when turning the screw easily got them started, so it seems the issue has been corrected.

Kevin Hawke - Reply

My kit it has it corrected as well (Jan Build)

Chris Bishop - Reply

January 2017 Kit, holes for M2 screw are tight, but may need to be, I used the thread tapping technique, 1/2 turn Clockwise, 1/4 Counter clockwise, until at least half the way down.

Frank Hubbard - Reply

The Holes are tights but pre screwing them half way without the stopper did the trick.

Charlie Leroy - Reply

Jan 17 kit still has the holes a little tight. I used a #41 drill bit by hand to open the hole for a start and then drove the screws down without the switch. This made assembly much easier.

Chris Yahnker - Reply

Here is the link to the exact step in a video I made in case it helps:

https://youtu.be/wa4Us6Och4c?t=22m6s

Darian Grant - Reply

Before tightening the screws push the endstop all the way towards the X-carriage as shown in the picture. Tighten the screws.
  • Before tightening the screws push the endstop all the way towards the X-carriage as shown in the picture.

  • Tighten the screws.

already tightened, you should put in step 14 "don't tighten yet"

william utriainen - Reply

+1, mine was already tightened as well, but luckily, I double checked the placement.

Kevin Hawke -

agreed.. mention this in the previous step to not tighten.

Kevin Smith - Reply

Move the X-carriage as close as possible to the X-end-motor.
  • Move the X-carriage as close as possible to the X-end-motor.

  • Make sure that you heard "click" sound and the X-endstop is triggered as shown in the picture.

Add Comment

Use ziptie to secure the X-endstop cable to the X-motor cable as close to the motor as possible. Do not overtie the ziptie otherwise you can damage the cables.
  • Use ziptie to secure the X-endstop cable to the X-motor cable as close to the motor as possible.

  • Do not overtie the ziptie otherwise you can damage the cables.

  • When done, cut the overhanging part of the zip tie.

From the look of the next step, you should also trim the tail of the zip tie as well.

Kevin Hawke - Reply

Use the smallest (in diameter) spiral wrap to wrap the cables. Use the smallest (in diameter) spiral wrap to wrap the cables.
  • Use the smallest (in diameter) spiral wrap to wrap the cables.

Add Comment

Congratulations! You've just assembled the X-axis.
  • Congratulations! You've just assembled the X-axis.

  • Don't be nervous that there isn't a belt, we'll get to that later.

  • You can continue by assembling Z-axis in the next chapter - 4. Z-axis assembly

Toujours pas de difficulté en suivant les instructions pas à pas. Temps passé sur l'axe X: 0h 45'

Roland Franclet - Reply

Finish Line

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Josef Prusa

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8 Comments

The bearings and all other parts fitted together snugly and with no problem whatsoever. The secret in assembling anything like this is nEVER force anything and following the directions on this web page made the job a piece of cake. Well done to Jo and his team making a kit so well put together. Now for the next step

Eddie Kennedy - Reply

26 Nov 2016: the X-axis bearings fit perfectly into the X-Carriage. Step 14 & Step 15 did have difficulty starting the M2-12 screws; I started them by applying down force with my thumbnail (pliers would work too) and turning the hex wrench at the same time.

Gene Simonalle - Reply

Easy steps, really enjoyed this section before bedtime. :-D

Andras Farkas - Reply

Anyone else make servo sound effects when putting the x-carriage on the bearings?

Adam Harris - Reply

Here's the links again that I posted at the end of the last chapter:

Hey Josef and everyone else, I documented my experience with figuring out how to build this and put it into separate videos for each chapter. I'll post the appropriate video links in the comments as I think this could help others if they get stuck, and it can definitely help Josef get an understanding of what went well and what did not for a complete rookie with no knowledge of 3D printing during the assembly.

Hopefully this doesn't get flagged :)

Chapter 2: Y-axis assembly: https://youtu.be/rn5sd3P0JLo

Chapter 3: X-axis assembly: https://youtu.be/wa4Us6Och4c

Chapter 4: Z-axis assembly: https://youtu.be/2c3aLKzhmfs

Chapter 5: Extruder assembly: https://youtu.be/GriVVWuBRBk

Chapter 6: LCD assembly: https://youtu.be/MM5mq08KZHI

Chapter 7: PSU & Heatbed assembly: https://youtu.be/2InxHeDymxo

Chapter 8: Electronics assembly: https://youtu.be/UrsNxx_Dfao

Chapter 9: Preflight check: https://youtu.be/00AmUbQVaUI

Enjoy!

Darian

Darian Grant - Reply

I just realized I could add comments. You don't see them if you are working with the guide in full screen.

I had a bit of trouble with the X-end-motor part with this section. The base of the part has a lip around it and on the inside of all the holes. I had to trim the opening and use a screw driver to pry open the hole to insert the bearing in step 4. It was a combination of the part being a little on the small side and having that lip around the edges.

I also had to sand down the surface of the X-end-motor part where the X-endstop needed to be mounted. The surface was very rough and protruded up which twisted the X-endstop and prevented it from laying flat.

I'm not sure if this is in the file itself or was just a bad print but I thought I would bring it up so you would be aware of the problem.

Grant

Grant Bomgaars - Reply

This section, 3. X-axis Assembly, took me 58-minutes to complete as a beginner. One thing to note was, the X-carriage didn't have cable tie holes going completely through. I had to Dremel holes through the back side of the X-carriage to complete the task.

Todd McDermaid - Reply

Took 30 mins for my daughter and I.

Andrew Purcell - Reply

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