2.5mm Allen key
  • 2.5mm Allen key

  • Needle-nose pliers

suggested time 60min

Raino Kolk - Reply

Rambo-cover-base
  • Rambo-cover-base

  • Rambo-cover-door

  • Rambo-cover-hinge top

  • Rambo-cover-hinge bottom

  • Casing parts can slightly differ from pictures.

The Rambo cover 3D printed parts (3) I received in the Jan 2017 kit are slightly different from the photo. The Rambo cover only requires a top hinge. No place for bottom hinge. The Rambo cover base now has 3 rows of vent holes.

Carol J - Reply

Same here. It doesn't have the edge where the Rambo-cover hinge bottom is gone.

Charles - Reply

I got mine 2 weeks ago, it did have the parts as pictured.

James Slater - Reply

I would have preferred the nut/bolt/stuff parts list for this step. It was printed on the packaging, not the manual, in the other chapters but not so in my kit for this step.

Marianne Davis - Reply

Insert M3n nuts (4 pcs) in nut traps. Insert M3nS (1 pcs) Insert M3nS (1 pcs)
  • Insert M3n nuts (4 pcs) in nut traps.

  • Insert M3nS (1 pcs)

This step specifies 5 nuts, but only 4 are indicated in the photo.

Scott Taschler - Reply

My mistake. I figured out where the 5th nut goes when I couldn't get the cover to screw tight. Should have known...

Scott Taschler - Reply

The 5th nut was a tight fit, so I substituted a square nut from the (generous) spares bag

Howard Watkins - Reply

thank god, the square one fits so much better!

Rex Lu -

I gave up on this one too and used the square nut from the spare bag. It was a perfect fit.

Dimo Pepelyashev -

Looks like they may have substituted a square nut for everyone. I only received 4 of the hex nuts in my box, and 1 square

Dustin Woodward -

Make sure you get the nuts as flush to the case as possible, otherwise you may have trouble getting the screws to catch them in Step 9. I pushed them in using the wide, flat side of one of the large wrenches.

Kevin Hawke - Reply

In my kit (january 2017) the 5th nut was replaced for a square nut.

João Fortunato - Reply

For me as well (Jan 17 kit) the 5th one in the other piece is a square nut

Tom Chambers - Reply

These instructions should mention the new square nut. 4 M3n, 1 M3nS.

Timothy Lee Russell - Reply

I used scotch tape to hold the nuts in while I mounted the case to the frame.

Terry Sherman - Reply

Should be mentioned - the first four nuts are on the first part of the case, the fifth nut is on the second (big) part of the case.

Spent some time trying to find it on the first part of the case.

Fred Smith - Reply

I set the nuts set in the case by tightening them in with the bolts and then removing the bolts. The nuts stayed where they were supposed to.

Marianne Davis - Reply

M3x10 screws (2 pcs) M3x10 screws (2 pcs)
  • M3x10 screws (2 pcs)

In my kit there is no square nut trap shown in Step 3.

Bruce Boyes - Reply

None of the 3mm holes in my Z-axis plate are threded. This makes getting screws into them extremely difficult. Was this an oversight? I bought a 3 x 0.5 mm tap and it makes assembly *much* easier.

Bruce Boyes - Reply

It would be better to jump to step 8 and mount the hinges first so the box is not in your way.

Marvin Hufford - Reply

In the next step, use highlighted holes.
  • In the next step, use highlighted holes.

The holes can have some coating in them making it difficult to put the bolt in. Best to clear all 4 holes, and finding the thread, by putting a bolt in without the cover.

Jurgen B - Reply

Add a note to "run the two screws into the threaded frame holes prior to actually mounting the cover base to lessen the possibility of cross-threading".

Gary Linn - Reply

The M3 tapped holes for the hinge mounts need a tap run through them to correctly form threads.

Alan -

Oops now I see this comment about threads in the holes

Bruce Boyes - Reply

Slide X-axis cables through the Rambo cover while attaching the Rambo cover base to the frame as shown in the picture. The spiral wrap must run into the Rambo cover so it is held in place when tightened up. Tighten the Rambo cover base to the frame using supplied 2.5 mm spanner.
  • Slide X-axis cables through the Rambo cover while attaching the Rambo cover base to the frame as shown in the picture.

  • The spiral wrap must run into the Rambo cover so it is held in place when tightened up.

  • Tighten the Rambo cover base to the frame using supplied 2.5 mm spanner.

this step was quite difficult and awkward for me. I think the base could be attached the same way the PSU was attached.

Li Cai - Reply

I know exactly what you mean here. Could be pretty easy make this a little more elegant.

Alex -

Agree. This step is a poor design. Needs rethinking.

Herr Stutzman -

I totally agree, it was frustrating

Manuel baum -

concur. I've just spent half an hour trying to put in one screw. and I'm still trying. Horrifically bad design for the mounting of the control box.

Eric Davies -

Echo that, too time consuming

Dimo Pepelyashev -

What helped me out here was turning the cover 90 degrees so the open side was face up, which then gave easier access to get the top screw started. Once that screw was started and would hold on its own, I rotated the cover back down and used the ball end hex wrench angled from below the cover to screw in the bottom screw, which is now located in the correct position.

Scott Walhovd -

!#%$ this step! There's gotta be a better way to mount this to the frame. It took foooorever!

Rob Andrews -

Count me among those surprised that an obvious genius like Mr. Prusa hasn't figured out a better way than this to attach this effin' box. The prior 8 hours assembling this mother, and I had not lost my religion even once except the heatbed mounting, which was mostly because I was trying my best to not even get a fingerprint on it (lost cause). This little box about had me ready to trash the whole thing. The filament spool holders snap right on; surely this thing could be modified to do the same? Thanks to Scott W for his tip - between that and having figured out eventually (WAY too late) that the little red flathead they sent could be used as a nutdriver in many cases for the 2.5s, I finally got it. Thank you Jesus!

Craig Caudle -

Josef--Pleeeeeease implement a simple design change to this box, saving lots of time and frustration: extend a mounting tab above/outside the top side of the box; there is already a tap in the frame at that position. Too late for me and many others, but will save others'religion (like Craig, I lost mine here...). Thx

John Christensen -

Hello Joseph,

Please do your subsequent customers a really big favour that they will love...

Drop the 2.5mm supplied hex wrench and source locally an equivalent to this item:

(http://www.ebay.com/itm/201615086876?_tr...)

This tool can be used to great benefit wherever the 2.5mm wrench is called for.

I would also encourage you to add 2 small round holes in the cover base in Step 6 to allow straight thru access to the screws needed to attach this part - which are particularly hard to be secured with your presently supplied wrench.

Regards,

Ron

Ron Watt - Reply

I had a similar tool, which I used some of the time. However it will not help when fixing the Rambo base, for which the ball ended long hex wrench is very useful.

Howard Watkins -

Yip, echo that.. any allen wrench with a handle is generally long enough to clear the housing

Ryan -

I was having fun up until this point, this step is !&&*.

Ben - Reply

I agree with the other comments. This was waaaaaay to complicated. I recommend first screwing the M3 screws into the frame without the cover so that the threads are a little looser. Then repeat with the cover on.

A modification in the design would also be awesome!

Tobias Steinhausler - Reply

I heartily recommend Tobias' suggestion above (prepare the holes by pre-screwing without the Rambo case.) This made an impossible job simply tedious.

Brandon Dewberry - Reply

Yes, would've been a bit of a pain, but if you chase the screws beforehand to remove the powdercoat as Jurgen B mentioned, turn the cover 90deg so its open from the top as Scott W mentioned, and I find that if you use the ball-end hex wrench to screw in the top screw first but insert the wrench from the now bottom of the cover through the grating and into the end of the screw its no problem at all. Then just rotate back as Scott mentioned and you're done, 60 seconds

freeman swank - Reply

This step took me under a minute not counting threading the screws without/before the cover. This is how I did it:

1. Pre-thread the holes without the cover, this is a majority of the heartache and significantly easier to do without the cover.

2. Turn the printer so that the PSU is in the air and the x-axis motor towards the ground.

3. Thread the screws into the cover so that a little of the screw is sticking out.

4. Align the screws with the holes, use the ball-end hex and come under and through the grate for the top screw. I also used the ball end for the bottom .

Jerrod - Reply

This is the right way to do it. Worked like a champ for me. Would have been up with the others getting bleeped otherwise. Good job man.

Brian Easly -

You can stick the allen key through the venting slots of the base and reach the screw this way. Then it isn't all that hard to get the case onto the frame. In addition I screwed the M3's into the metal frame once before threading them through the printed part.

Andreas Nickel - Reply

After preparing the holes it is easier to use the long allen wrench and go through the slot cut in the side to reach the upper screw.

Charles - Reply

This step was the absolute worst part of the whole build. I ended up mounting the bottom hole first, then drilled a hole in the outside of the cover to allow a driver shaft to fit in straight so I could use a power tool. That was after I stripped the head on the top screw trying to get it halfway in.

The other issue is the positioning of the electronics. I would rather have the case flipped 90 or 180 deg so that you don't have to stick your head inside the printer to see the board. At the absolute least, the box should be setup with the holes on the outside of it rather than in. Considering what the rest of the printer is assembled out of, it's not like the cleaner look of having the holes on the inside of the box really changes the aesthetics, especially for a part that is on the rear of the unit.

James Slater - Reply

I hate to be "that guy", but I had no trouble at all with this step. I pre-threaded with another screw and used a ball head Allen wrench.

Bruce Crowder - Reply

No problem for me either. I ran a tap thru the holes first to clean out the powder coat, and if you didn't buy one before, get a ball nose 2.5mm allen wrench. It will make this a one minute job.

Dave Cook - Reply

The longer 2.5 mm allen wrench that came with my kit has the ball nose. It helped a lot on this step to have that.

Marianne Davis -

Make sure the x axis is up all the way you only want the last three inches or so going into the rambo box.

Dave Cook - Reply

Jesus, this was BY FAR the most frustrating part of the build so far... HORRIBLE idea... just use another one of those silly nut mounts and screw it from the other side, or drill a hole on top of the cover to be able to use a long screwdriver here.

Maximo Bredfeldt - Reply

This step was easy, but I had a very long 2.5mm spanner - which is not supplied with the tools.

Jim Jacques - Reply

After like 5 minutes spent on engaging the first screw and 5 more messing with the 2.5mm spanner 1/10th of turn at a time I just gave up. I pulled out a long hex screwdriver and did the job in under a minute. My screwdriver incidentally was a 2.5mm torx, and of course it's star shaped, but ALSO hex shaped. Worked wonderfully. I wish I thought of that before.

The supplied spanner should be one or two cm longer to get this job done easily, otherwise it's just causing unnecessary pain. Always use tools adequate for the job...

Paolo Gaiardelli - Reply

I want to thank everyone who did this before me. Your pain and notes for posterity helped me fly through this step. Ironically i got it all screwed in easily, but totally forgot to put the wires through the slot.

Daniel Naas - Reply

In the next step use the highlighted hole.
  • In the next step use the highlighted hole.

Add Comment

Tighten Rambo cover hinge bottom to the frame using one M3x10 screw and supplied 2.5 mm Allen key. Tighten Rambo cover hinge bottom to the frame using one M3x10 screw and supplied 2.5 mm Allen key.
  • Tighten Rambo cover hinge bottom to the frame using one M3x10 screw and supplied 2.5 mm Allen key.

should note here to raise x-axis motor to highest point so enough wire is left unpinched

Li Cai - Reply

Thanks for the tip. Raising the x-axis tip, saved me a great deal of time and frustration. Thanks.

Charles -

Add this note to Step 8 and Step 19: "Run the screw into the threaded frame hole prior to actually mounting the hinge part to lessen the possibility of cross-threading". I found the holes in the frame to be very tight and it was somewhat difficult to start the screws "straight".

Gary Linn - Reply

this is really hard to see what is going on, black on black

John Cummings - Reply

Snapped off a screw trying to mount the bottom hinge. Be careful with this thing, if it's struggling step back for a moment and try again. I'm going to have to superglue mine. :(

Chris Weed - Reply

Recommend to note that the holes are threaded and recommend to add a lead in countersink to help catch the first thread. Throughout the build I didnt realize I had been cross threading some of the holes. All along I thought the frame was a softer material allowing me to tap through. I too will have to ease out the broken fastener.

Ricardo Patino - Reply

I took some better photos with a macro lens and ring light. I will send them to you.

Bruce Boyes - Reply

I left the screw on this hinge just a little bit loose so the hinge could swivel left and right. After attaching the cover, you can tighten it down. Just in case this hinge isn't aligned vertically with the top hinge.

Kevin Hawke - Reply

The black on black here is really hard to see!

Tom Chambers - Reply

The kit I received Jan 2017 no longer has a Rambo cover bottom hinge in the design, so I just skipped this step.

Carol J - Reply

My Jan 2017 came with one.

Paul Criswell -

M3x10 screws (4 pcs) Slide the electronics into the Rambo cover base and secure the board in place using M3x10 screws.
  • M3x10 screws (4 pcs)

  • Slide the electronics into the Rambo cover base and secure the board in place using M3x10 screws.

  • Note the correct orientation of electronics and the Rambo cover base.

It might be good to add a comment about the option to solder the heated bed and possibly the hot end wires directly to the Rambo board, there seems to be a number of people who are finding that the plug connectors get hot and start melting. One of the support people mentioned that this is also done for the pre-assembled units that are shipped. I know for myself this would have saved some confusion/frustration/troubleshooting since after a couple hundred hours of great printing the heated bed suddenly stopped working and now I have to go back and remove the Rambo board to solder proper connections onto it.

Chad Scott - Reply

This should be swapped with Step 6. It is MUCH easier to mount the board in the rambo case before mounting it to the frame.

Garrett Miller - Reply

But if you mount the board to case first, you cannot mount the case to the frame.

Zoltan - Reply

X-axis motor Y-axis motor Z-axis motors (the order of Z-motors doesn't matter )
  • X-axis motor

  • Y-axis motor

  • Z-axis motors (the order of Z-motors doesn't matter )

  • X-axis endstop

  • Y-axis endstop

  • Low voltage main cables (wires going out from PSU)

  • All motor cables have their marking for easier assembly.

  • Connect cables and arrange cables as shown in the picture. Check all connectors are properly plugged!

Which cable is the pwr in and which is the bed in?

Art - Reply

The 2 cables are interchangeable

Art -

i had to turn the image upside down to make it easier as i'm working from the angle shown in step 9

dito milian - Reply

It would be very helpful to rotate the image of the board with the different colour squares 90 degrees clockwise so it looks the same as the board when its installed

John Cummings - Reply

Seconded. The best orientation for installing connectors is 180 degrees rotated from the image provided. I also copied the color-coded images to an offline viewer and rotated them when verifying connections. I found an error.

Brandon Dewberry -

Add a note to say red stripe = power in

John Cummings - Reply

Bed in also has a red stripe

Bruce Crowder -

January 2017 model, has nice label tags on the motor wires at the connector. thanks

Frank Hubbard - Reply

Double check that you are plugging the power leads into the correct terminals. These connectors also fit the extruder power out headers.

Chris Yahnker - Reply

Guide the cables from the heatbed through the bottom hole of the Rambo cover base. Push the filament all the way down through the filament holder hole in the Rambo cover base.
  • Guide the cables from the heatbed through the bottom hole of the Rambo cover base.

  • Push the filament all the way down through the filament holder hole in the Rambo cover base.

Might want to add a note back in the cable wrapping instructions NOT to cut off excess of the 3mm filament (which i did :P)

rabidninjawombat - Reply

i had to turn the image upside down to make it easier as i'm working from the angle shown in step 9

dito milian - Reply

Through written as trough

John Cummings - Reply

Thank you! :)

Josef Prusa -

I was a bit confused with rabidninja comment above since i found myself in the same situation and didn want to cut the filament. If you ended up in the same situation, chances you switched the heated bed filament with extruder one which is longer. Would've been nice if I got different colors but mine were same!

Mohamed Enein - Reply

Using a ziptie, tie the cables from the heatbed to the  Rambo cover base at the end of the spiral wrap. Ensure the heatbed connector is plugged correctly and all the way in.
  • Using a ziptie, tie the cables from the heatbed to the Rambo cover base at the end of the spiral wrap.

  • Ensure the heatbed connector is plugged correctly and all the way in.

  • Double check the zip tie is tied firmly, there is a lot of movement.

I had to cut an excess of nylon wire, about 2cm, otherwise the spiral wrap was too short for the zip tie.

Paolo Gaiardelli - Reply

I found out my error. The nylon wire has to be exactly the length it is. Make it shorter and it puts too much strain on the heated bed.

It was the spiral wrap that had to be pulled a bit. I ended up buying one 3mm nylon wire roll for the grass trimmer. For euros 4 I got a nice roll of wire that made a perfect replacement!

Paolo Gaiardelli - Reply

Guide the cables from the extruder through the upper hole of the Rambo cover base. Push the filament all the way down through the filament holder hole in the Rambo cover base.
  • Guide the cables from the extruder through the upper hole of the Rambo cover base.

  • Push the filament all the way down through the filament holder hole in the Rambo cover base.

Add Comment

Using a ziptie, tie the cables from the extruder to the Rambo cover base at the end of the spiral wrap. Using a ziptie, tie the cables from the extruder to the Rambo cover base at the end of the spiral wrap. Using a ziptie, tie the cables from the extruder to the Rambo cover base at the end of the spiral wrap.
  • Using a ziptie, tie the cables from the extruder to the Rambo cover base at the end of the spiral wrap.

I think the case could use 5-10 mm more room to the back. The extruder wire loom coming in puts a little pressure on the endstop connections.

Adam Harris - Reply

When securing the extruder cables to the Rambo, I found that the cables impeded the carriage from hitting the end stop. If you twist the cables so that they extend over the build plate, instead of toward the outside, the carriage hits the end stop better. Hopefully this will translate to less problems when I print.

Daniel Naas - Reply

P.I.N.D.A. probe Extruder motor Heatbed heater
  • P.I.N.D.A. probe

  • Extruder motor

  • Heatbed heater

  • Extruder heater

  • DOUBLE CHECK the connection! It is so important to ensure the correct connections.

I thought it was a highlight but it was just the color of the board.

william utriainen - Reply

i had to turn the image upside down to make it easier as i'm working from the angle shown in step 9

dito milian - Reply

Make a print of the cables from step 18 - it helps get the orientation right.

Howard Watkins - Reply

If you accidentally put the power cables into the slots for the heated bed and extruder just like me: you don't have to unmount all of the board, you can slide a screwdriver through the hole where the heated bed cables go into the housing and lift the lock of the cables

Manuel baum - Reply

Again please rotate this 90 degrees clockwise :)

John Cummings - Reply

good idea :)

Ghislain -

Wow my heatbed heated plug fits very tight. Tight as in i had to eek out 2mms to get the cord to stretch to get it to plug into the slot. I'm concerned about the torque on the plug on the board. We'll see.

Daniel Naas - Reply

Extruder thermistor (cable going from the extruder labeled with Yellow/Green heat shrink) [Orientation does not matter] Heatbed thermistor (white or black cable going from the heatbed)
  • Extruder thermistor (cable going from the extruder labeled with Yellow/Green heat shrink) [Orientation does not matter]

  • Heatbed thermistor (white or black cable going from the heatbed)

  • Print fan (cable going from the extruder labeled with Red heat shrink)[make sure that the red wire is closer to the thermistor]

  • Extruder fan (cable going from the extruder labeled with Blue heat shrink)

  • DOUBLE CHECK the connection! It is important to ensure the correct connections!

i had to turn the image upside down to make it easier as i'm working from the angle shown in step 9

dito milian - Reply

At this point I discovered the 3mm filament was no longer captive in its hole at the extruder end. Worth checking!

Howard Watkins - Reply

The wire for the thermistor is very long. Can it be doubled up inside the spiral wrap (especially as I need to re-thread the spiral wrap - see above)?

Howard Watkins - Reply

Does the orientation matter? It seems that ther are no tabs on the side of the cable plugs to make sure they are orientated correctly, so if it doesn't matter it might be worth noting.

Trak Johnson - Reply

Plugging 2x 2way plugs into a 4way socket feels very confusing. I can see that you cannot use 4way plugs so maybe 2x 2way on the board with a tiny air gap.

Mark H - Reply

Please make it even more obvious that the polarity on the print fan connector is critical since the connector is not keyed. I missed that the first time around!

Jed Ludlow - Reply

+1 Me too. Proper polarity of both fan connections. Found and corrected during selftest.

Brandon Dewberry -

My print fan cable had no red heat shrink, but the blue did so I could still tell them apart.

Bruce Boyes - Reply

The picture here is upside down relative to the board orientation, which is super annoying to do the wiring. Please post an updated picture.

Chris Yahnker - Reply

My heatbed cable is black with yellow shrink wrap.

Bruce Crowder - Reply

Same here the white wire is now black with yellow heat shrink.

James -

LCD cable with ONE stripe (Connector P1) LCD cable with TWO stripes (Connector P2)
  • LCD cable with ONE stripe (Connector P1)

  • LCD cable with TWO stripes (Connector P2)

  • Make sure that the key of connector is matching the key on the electronics.

While the instructions indicate that the cable needs to be "keyed correctly" the pins on the Printed Circuit Board (PCB) do not have clear keys as compared to the lcd module (where the keying is clear). Additional information that would help clarify this would be along the lines that the red conductor is up as installed or that the red connector is pin 10 (if this is true) as the pin numbers are indicated on the PCB. In my case, red was up for both cables.

Jeanne - Reply

I agree. The key is not clear. Since pin 10 is clearly marked on the board, a common technique would be to inform the builder that the red wire in the ribbon is goes to pin 10.

Brandon Dewberry -

i had to turn the image upside down to make it easier as i'm working from the angle shown in step 9

dito milian - Reply

The "key" is printed on the circuit board. It is obscured by the outlining in the picture. It might be more clear it you put another picture in showing the key.

Michael Fitzgerald - Reply

My LCD connectors look backwards from the picture. When looking at the fold head on the red stripe is on the right. If I plug them in so the cables come in from the right then the red stripe would be at the bottom.

Mitch Allen - Reply

Same for me, too.

Chris Shaker -

Make sure your ribbon cables go on the outside of the wire wrap from the print bed, or you will be re-doing them like me. Also, if you have big hands and fingers, it's easier to insert the grasp them by the back end using the needle nose pliers.

Kevin Hawke - Reply

Usually ribbon cables have the red stripe on pin 1. These have it on pin 10. Shrouded headers on the Rambo board would be a good thing. I realize they take up more space, but it would make it possible to only plug them one way.

Bruce Boyes - Reply

I agree - Pin 1 is usually the red stripe and the key that is drawn on the PCB is hard to see once it's in the case.

Kevin Thomas - Reply

Best practic is to make all connectors different so no two are the same. Or use connectors with one more pin then needed and block a different hole in each connector and remove the coresponding pin from the connector . This will prevent any possible Error. And of course choose connectors that can only fit in one direction.

Gary kshepitzki - Reply

The cables from my LCD were odd. Each cable had one line at one end and two lines at the other. This meant that when I followed the instructions the wires were crossed and the LCD didn't turn on. When I swapped the PCB connections all was well..

Andy Bower - Reply

Attention aux amis électroniciens, car comme le souligne Bruce Boyes l'usage est que le fil rouge correspond à la pinoche N°1.

Or ici il est du côté de la pinoche #10. et une fois dans la boîte, la sérigraphie n'est plus trop visible.

Roland Franclet - Reply

The instructions should say:

Make sure the black tab on the cable connector faces the Prusa frame. OR..

Make sure the shape of the cable connector matches the shape printed on circuit board. AND...

"Pay attention to orientation of connector"

I plugged my Prusa in for the first time and nothing happened... I started troubleshooting and found the LCD connectors were plugged in backwards. Hope this helps

Patryk Walters - Reply

Check your electronics connection with the attached picture.
  • Check your electronics connection with the attached picture.

There are 2 sets of z axis motor cables. They plug in one in front of the other.

Art - Reply

It helped me to print out a copy of the wiring and then I checked off each connector. I did have the print fan connected incorrectly.

Gary Linn - Reply

Great idea. +1

Bruce Boyes -

For troubleshooting Endstops wiring error Z, schematics should dual label P.I.N.D.A. probe also is the Z-endstop

Jeanne - Reply

In the next step use the highlighted hole.
  • In the next step use the highlighted hole.

Add Comment

M3x10 screw (1 pcs) Rambo-cover upper hinge Insert M3x10 screw into the hinge.
  • M3x10 screw (1 pcs)

  • Rambo-cover upper hinge

  • Insert M3x10 screw into the hinge.

  • Move the heatbed all the way towards the LCD for easier access.

  • Assemble the Rambo-cover doors on the lower hinge attached to the frame and slide the upper hinge in place.

  • Secure the upper hinge to the frame.

You need to move the bed plate to the front when attaching the rambo cover, otherwise it fouls the cables on the bed plate.

Howard Watkins - Reply

2 screws and one whole now usless! First screw rounded out as it was SO tight. I took the second screw and tried again and it snapped in the hole how do I get it out.....what on earth do I do?????

Robert Merwiak - Reply

.......And now the spare screw I used in the bottom hole has rounded out so I cannot get it further in or out.........why great design until the last part when faith in the whole set-up dwindles.......I suppose I will have to tie the electronics box together with good old string.......>£600 for this??

Robert Merwiak - Reply

Did you ever figure this out? I had the same exact issue where it was pretty tough (7 out of 10 ) to tighten the screw here. Then suddenly *pop* and the screw snapped in half. I'm going to try and drill it out with a tiny drill bit.. Bummer.. Everything else was very straight forward

Christian Lampman -

the frame was powder coated, the powder coating does make the threads tight and can be a problem. I "chased" the threads with an M3 x 0.5 tap. "chase" means clean existing threads with a tap.

Frank Hubbard - Reply

Like the other connections to the frame, it seems like a good idea to run the screw all the way through first to tap the hole and then attach the part.

Timothy Lee Russell - Reply

Yes, I used the screw alone as a tap. Half a turn in, 1/4 of turn back. Afterwards, the screw went in smoothly and the rest of the assembly became a breeze.

Paolo Gaiardelli -

It was easier for me to slide the top hinge into the door before putting the door on the bottom hinge.

Trevor Vannoy - Reply

Thank you, I did exactly that and it worked wonderfully

Paolo Gaiardelli -

M3x40 screw (1 pcs) Close the Rambo-cover doors
  • M3x40 screw (1 pcs)

  • Close the Rambo-cover doors

  • Make sure that no wire is pinched!

  • Tighten M3x40 screw.

the bolt doesn't tighten, the hole in the door where the bolt goes is too big for the nut to grip onto it

John Cummings - Reply

Same here. The hole in the cover is too large. Ziptie for now!

JP Timmerman -

The cover is designed to have a square nut inserted for the long screw to screw into. This was not supplied so I took one from the spares kit.

No reference is make to this in the instructions and should be added.

Stewart Bryant -

You should mention, that a M3 nut should be placed in the enclosing door. There is a small opening in that part. I put added the nut and secured it with a little drip of hot glue to prevent it falling away.

Ralf Edmund Stranzenbach - Reply

I was going to write "the lid needs a square nut" and found like you said the hole is there ready fir it. Spares bag supplied the nut :)

Mark H - Reply

I too have the problem where the case screw will not grip and the case does not close. Will try the square nut solution or maybe reprint the part.

Jerold Von Hemel - Reply

All the wires needed to be "squeezed" a bit to get the door shut. A better phrase may be "make sure no wire is pinched."

Brandon Dewberry - Reply

What a rat's nest it is :-)

Avi Schwartz - Reply

indeed, I was a bit worried because the heatbed cable had to be twisted down quite a bit, but in the end this might keep it tight enough to avoid transmitting strain to the PCB. I'm going to install a MOSFET board soon anyways. Yay, I see the light :)

Paolo Gaiardelli -

A la fermeture de la porte, on se rend compte qu'il y a pas mal de câbles à ranger!

Temps passé sur cette étape cruciale: 1h 05'.

Roland Franclet - Reply

Congratulations, you've just assembled the whole Original Prusa i3 MK2 3D printer!
  • Congratulations, you've just assembled the whole Original Prusa i3 MK2 3D printer!

  • You're almost there... Just finish the chapter 9. Preflight check

Woohoo! Turned it on and it works. Soooo happy right now! :) Please note: don't be afraid to use the spares bag for extra zip ties (other than just the key locations pointed out, there are also more cable management tie points that can be used) and for the fasteners (in at least two steps during assembly, I swapped out a screw for a slightly longer one, and had better results - especially when the 3D printed parts might be a tiny bit outside tolerances)

Karim Sultan - Reply

checking your wiring is virtually impossible given the position of the box, the size of a human head, and the opacity of the wires. A more spacious circuit board would help.

Eric Davies - Reply

Yeah, I'm not going to check them either. I used a flashlight and made sure to place them correctly in the first place. Going to kamikaze the final check, straight to chapter 9!!!

Paolo Gaiardelli -

In my case the power switch on the PSU is wonky - I turned it on and nothing happened so I tried a different power cable and double-checked the electrical connections. Again, nothing. In desperation I gave the "on side" of the power switch a push with my thumb and voila!

toby cabot - Reply

Finish Line

203 other people completed this guide.

Josef Prusa

Member since: 01/05/2015

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24 Comments

The printer has had many good improvements, and this is one of them, however, I still think this housing (http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1102368) is better than the new one for the MK2. It seems sturdier because the cables for the heated bed and extruder are really hold up in place. Maybe a downside of this housing is that it requires and awful lot of screws, probably more than needed.

Lamps - Reply

i didn´t had any issues builduing the printer, the two mistakes i did was to blame the beer i had in my other hand. i was sent two extra m10 nuts in the Y axis bolts bag. apart from that, a little 90 mins getting the Z axis well done. nice build, nice instructions, online works better than the printed book, but, i have to say i have build a few aluminatus from trinitylabs, and the previous iterations pf the prusa from makerfarm (wooden) and i have to say this printer i s pretty well done, it is one of the best kits out there. well documented and precise to build. i had a snapoff with the extruder temp sensor because i curled too much the cables housing but i soldered straight and it is back on business. one thing is y was really used to print on 3mm filament and i have like...6 kg still in my 3d box. can i just put an hexagon hotend? or is there an e3d extruder version on 3mm? also i really want an extruder temperature sensor replacement. and another thing. can the marlin firmware glass sensors be used?

felipe valdivia - Reply

Using only different colour boxes and arrows for identifying which cables go where will make it hard for colourblind people to know what to do. You could use coloured numbers or letters instead/as well as. There are also colour palettes available that are colourblindness friendly, there is an example here http://jfly.iam.u-tokyo.ac.jp/color/#see

John Cummings - Reply

I agree with the color legend not working for the colorblind... I had to have my son and wife differentiate the colors in a few places.

Devon Heron -

I am not colorblind and still had trouble with the color coding , though I was working out of the book where the shades of red, especially, seem closer than the online manuals . I ended up going through and numbering the items and also each time the item was color-keyed in the pictures for reference.

Marianne Davis -

This part of the assembly was the most difficult for me. The way the Rambo case is fixed to the frame is probably the worst way! It should be screwed from the outside instead of from the inside - you need really small hands to screw the thing as it is done now! Also, the hinges and door should be installed before the electronics - that makes it less tough to do. And lastly, you should redo the pictures with a white case - that way we would see better!

Andre Laurendeau - Reply

I agree, the case attachment design is truely awful. It took me more than half an hour to screw the first half of the case to the frame...holes are too tight while trying to turn from the inside of a box. Then when trying to screw on the hinges I rounded out 2 screws and another broke in the hole.....the box is now held together with tape....I though it easier than string.... £££££ really?

Robert Merwiak -

M3 x 10mm screws are much to short to attach the rambo box to the vertical frame. Further, because the vertical frame is threaded, you really cant draw two threaded items together. So, I drilled my vertical frame box mounting holes out to 3.2mm and used M3x15 screws. Note: in several places there are instructions to use a screw through a threaded hole into a separate threaded item - the hot bed frame and hot bed nuts is a good example. You cannot use a screw in this manner! I also drilled out the bed mounting holes to 3.2mm.

chris berardi - Reply

In all the places where it seems like you are passing a screw through a threaded hole into another threaded item, the first part is actually intended to be a clearance hole. It just seems like it is a threaded hole that you have to screw through because many of the holes are slightly undersized - the holes in the plastic parts due to printing inaccuracies and filament debris, and the clearance holes in the frame due to paint. Clear them with a needle file or a 3mm drill.

The holes in the frame that are threaded, I cleared of paint by running an M3 tap through them.

Matthew Kendall -

All my 3mm threaded holes were so filled with paint, apparently, no threads were visible. There should be a warning about this, and include a 3mm tap in the kit if it is needed. I forced the motor mount screws in OK thinking that was how it was supposed to be, until I read here in the online version of others having the same problem. Other than that, this seems to be a very high quality design. Clearly a lot of thought has gone into it. The documentation is not perfect but is a very good attempt and usable. The online version (I should have gone with it from the beginning) is much nicer with the higher res photos. This will be my first 3D printer...

Bruce Boyes - Reply

Agree on the 3mm tap. Fortunately I had one at hand - if I hadn't I'm sure I would have broken a few screws until I went and purchased a tap. I ended up just tapping all the holes that I needed in the frame - it just made it SOOO much easier to fit the screws (with a small Allen key). Overall, I'm pretty happy with the kit - managed not to break any parts so far. Being able to enlarge the photos on this online manual was great! Now for the pre-flight.....

Dietmar Jurgensen -

I agree the design of the rambo case is awful .It is far to small, difficult to fit ,all the wires are crammed into it, and a disaster waiting to happen. There is loads of room why not make it bigger.

steve A - Jan 29

Steve A - Reply

This was my first build and I must say that these instructions were very well laid out. I worked on Japanese machine tools with manuals translated to English and they were a nightmare (I called it Japish) the translation was terrible. Prusa is a non-English speaking company and their instructions were very well written for us in the USA. The comments section is very helpful there were alot of good tips in there. Couple of things I think should be changed is including that frame alignment fixture that was posted in the comment section for putting the frame together. I had a hard time understanding what the purpose of putting the y-axis frame inside the z-axis frame until I got to that step in assembly. The electronic plug in at the main board was very difficult to visualize with the pictures 180 degs off from were I had to lay the machine down. Overall very nice job from Prusa

Carl W Swanson - Reply

++++totally agree

Marianne Davis -

Here's the links again that I posted at the end of the last chapter:

Hey Josef and everyone else, I documented my experience with figuring out how to build this and put it into separate videos for each chapter. I'll post the appropriate video links in the comments as I think this could help others if they get stuck, and it can definitely help Josef get an understanding of what went well and what did not for a complete rookie with no knowledge of 3D printing during the assembly.

Hopefully this doesn't get flagged :)

Chapter 2: Y-axis assembly: https://youtu.be/rn5sd3P0JLo

Chapter 3: X-axis assembly: https://youtu.be/wa4Us6Och4c

Chapter 4: Z-axis assembly: https://youtu.be/2c3aLKzhmfs

Chapter 5: Extruder assembly: https://youtu.be/GriVVWuBRBk

Chapter 6: LCD assembly: https://youtu.be/MM5mq08KZHI

Chapter 7: PSU & Heatbed assembly: https://youtu.be/2InxHeDymxo

Chapter 8: Electronics assembly: https://youtu.be/UrsNxx_Dfao

Chapter 9: Preflight check: https://youtu.be/00AmUbQVaUI

Enjoy!

Darian

Darian Grant - Reply

Here's the links again that I posted at the end of the last chapter:

Hey Josef and everyone else, I documented my experience with figuring out how to build this and put it into separate videos for each chapter. I'll post the appropriate video links in the comments as I think this could help others if they get stuck, and it can definitely help Josef get an understanding of what went well and what did not for a complete rookie with no knowledge of 3D printing during the assembly.

Hopefully this doesn't get flagged :)

Chapter 2: Y-axis assembly: https://youtu.be/rn5sd3P0JLo

Chapter 3: X-axis assembly: https://youtu.be/wa4Us6Och4c

Chapter 4: Z-axis assembly: https://youtu.be/2c3aLKzhmfs

Chapter 5: Extruder assembly: https://youtu.be/GriVVWuBRBk

Chapter 6: LCD assembly: https://youtu.be/MM5mq08KZHI

Chapter 7: PSU & Heatbed assembly: https://youtu.be/2InxHeDymxo

Chapter 8: Electronics assembly: https://youtu.be/UrsNxx_Dfao

Chapter 9: Preflight check: https://youtu.be/00AmUbQVaUI

Enjoy!

Darian

Darian Grant - Reply

Just finished putting it all together tonight (have not switched on,had enough and tired !) The wireing has been the hardest and longest section for me but I have really enjoyed the build. I think the wireing of the main board has been the weakest and most frustrating part for me, big hands don't help and my eyes don't focus like they used to. Access from the out side of the machine would make the wireing a lot easier . Looking forward to the mk3 ! Happy printing. Jez.

Jeremy Saunders - Reply

Hey Josef and everyone else, I documented my experience with figuring out how to build this and put it into separate videos for each chapter. I'll post the appropriate video links in the comments as I think this could help others if they get stuck, and it can definitely help Josef get an understanding of what went well and what did not for a complete rookie with no knowledge of 3D printing during the assembly.

Chapter 2: Y-axis assembly

https://youtu.be/rn5sd3P0JLo

Chapter 3: X-axis assembly

https://youtu.be/wa4Us6Och4c

Chapter 4: Z-axis assembly

https://youtu.be/2c3aLKzhmfs

Chapter 5: Extruder assembly

https://youtu.be/GriVVWuBRBk

Chapter 6: LCD assembly

https://youtu.be/MM5mq08KZHI

Chapter 7: PSU & Heatbed assembly

https://youtu.be/2InxHeDymxo

Chapter 8: Electronics assembly

https://youtu.be/UrsNxx_Dfao

Chapter 9: Preflight check

https://youtu.be/00AmUbQVaUI

Final calibrations and first test print!

https://youtu.be/ZbO2HGN3oKs

Enjoy!

Darian

Darian Grant - Reply

Hey Josef and everyone else, I documented my experience with figuring out how to build this and put it into separate videos for each chapter. I'll post the appropriate video links in the comments as I think this could help others if they get stuck, and it can definitely help Josef get an understanding of what went well and what did not for a complete rookie with no knowledge of 3D printing during the assembly.

Chapter 2: Y-axis assembly

https://youtu.be/rn5sd3P0JLo

Chapter 3: X-axis assembly

https://youtu.be/wa4Us6Och4c

Chapter 4: Z-axis assembly

https://youtu.be/2c3aLKzhmfs

Chapter 5: Extruder assembly

https://youtu.be/GriVVWuBRBk

Chapter 6: LCD assembly

https://youtu.be/MM5mq08KZHI

Chapter 7: PSU & Heatbed assembly

https://youtu.be/2InxHeDymxo

Chapter 8: Electronics assembly

https://youtu.be/UrsNxx_Dfao

Chapter 9: Preflight check

https://youtu.be/00AmUbQVaUI

Final calibrations and first test print!

https://youtu.be/ZbO2HGN3oKs

Enjoy!

Darian

Darian Grant - Reply

I would like to suggest that you wait until all the electronics are wired and the whole machine assembled before you install the spool-holders. I'm pretty sure that I whacked myself in the forehead at least 47 times on the spool-holders while trying to make all the connections in the tiny and black RAMBO box. That's another thing, the one area where I needed extra light the most was inside the RAMBO case. I would suggest that you make that part orange so you can at least see a little better while trying to twist your head sideways to match the images on the screen while you are making the connections.

Thanks,

Grant

Grant Bomgaars - Reply

This section, 8. Electronics Assembly, took me 1-hour 7-minutes to complete.

Todd McDermaid - Reply

C'était mon premier kit et pas de regret de l'avoir choisi. Il m'a fallu 8h 35 pour assembler le tout.

Roland Franclet - Reply

Had no problem assembling electronics, tipped the printer on its side and it was straightforward. Downside is connectors to power supply, heatbed and extruder should be higher current rating to avoid overheating

geoff williams - Reply

I would suggest that the mini rambo be wired up not connected to the plastic case on the 3d printer. Install the nuts in their slots in the casing first for future . Mount the pcb onto the plastic base then wire up electronics as per instruction with the plastic and pcb on a desk near printer , open plan . Once fully tested as working you know the 3d printer works and now having done a trial run on the electronics assembly you can try mounting the case properly. I think this case demands a few more iterations for easier installation as too the assembly in sections . I also suggest a switch nearby the power supply ON-OFF right near printer in case the printer does something weird OR you have

das3d - Reply

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