The Original Prusa i3 MK3 is the successor of the award-winning Original Prusa i3 MK2 3D printer.

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Prusa i3 MK3 frame not level

I have a Prusa i3 MK3 kit which I have just begun to build. I've followed the instructions to the letter and I've taken apart and reassembled the frame several times, and I cannot make the frame level. I've tried rotating the extrusions and front/rear plates in different combinations. I attached all 4 extrusions and set the frame on the front and back plates with the plates laying down flat, and at that point the frame is level, so I believe I have an issue with either the front or back plate either being warped, misshaped or the holes are misaligned. The frame does not begin to wobble until I tighten the screws on the front and back plates. I tried applying downward pressure on the frame while tightening the screws for the plates with no luck. I used a feeler gauge underneath the front plate of the assembled frame and it's off by about .61 MM.

Has anyone else run into this issue, and if so can you recommend a solution? I've sent this question to Prusa Support, but I thought I'd post it here in case someone else has had this problem. I was hoping I was just missing something and do not need new front and rear plates.

Answer this question I have this problem too

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Hi Darrel,

I asked our developers to define the limits under which the frame is still considered as "straight". I will answer you as soon as I have the values.

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Through clamping down the frame and altering the screw tightening sequence, I was able to get it down to .2 MM. Also, I believe I've narrowed the issue to be a problem with the front plate. The right front corner/leg of the plate is raised off of a flat surface by .2 MM. The other three corners are normal.

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Hi Jakub, thanks for info.

I rotated the front plate by 180° and got the lift down to 0.1-0.2mm.

I assembled the whole thing and it passed the tests with flying colours, xyz calibration and all.

The one thing I had some problems with was the first layer calibration... From time to time the material on the build plate gets pulled away when the nozzle changes direction of travel (when the nozzle height is at around -.5), at -.4 the material does not stick, and at -.6 the first layer height is too low ("curls" of material appear).

Would turning on the nozzle fan at the first layer help?

Thanks in advance for any info!

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Hi Szymon, this will be related either to the dirty surface of the heatbed or to the Live Adjust Z.

Curls are no issue, you can go below them. Just make sure the nozzle won't hit the heatbed bed surface.

On the MK3 we have quite often values of Live adjust Z around -0.9 to -1.1

In very rare scenario this can be also filament related if you have some other PLA with you, I recommend trying it as well.

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Same thing here.

I can get this down to .4mm minimum, after 2hrs trying.

I don't know if this is acceptable or not, but it started to get on my nerves.

Shall i go on with the build or is it so critical that the print quality will suffer?

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Hi Szymon, I don't have the limits with me (devs are working on it), but I suggest you going further with the build and see if you can pass the calibration and successfully print the included 3D models. If not, please contact our support at (info@prusa3d.com).

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I'm currently assembling my MK3 and running into the same issue where the right side of my frame is significantly lower than the left.. I tried leveling it on a flat surface and it appears to be straight, but when I tighten the screw it throws everything off.. I've now scratch the heat bed a little while attempting to calibrate..

currently tearing it down to the frame again to try and square it off.. any other suggestions on getting the frame perfectly straight?

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A few things:

After you've attached the extrusions to the main frame, lay the front and back plates down on a flat surface, and then set the main frame on top of the plates with the front extrusions resting on the front plate and the rear extrusions resting on the back plate. See if the frame rocks. If it does rock, check your extrusions and frame to make sure they're not bent and that they are attached properly.

Try flipping the front plate and see if that helps.

If you have the means, clamp down the frame on a completely flat surface after you've attached the front and back plate but before fully tightening the screws. If you do not have the means, attach the front and back plates and put downward pressure on the frame while tightening the screws.

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In my case, the issue was with the front plate. I believe the screw holes were slightly misaligned. So, what I did was attach the back plate and tighten the screws. Then, I attached the front plate, clamped down the frame, and figured out a tightening sequence for the screws. By tightening the screws in different orders, I was able to get the gap down from .61 mm to .2mm. It was tedious, but it made the most difference. This is optional, but after all that work I didn't want the screws to work themselves loose over time, so I used a light duty threadlocker on both the front and back plate screws.

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I had the same issue as all of u did and solved it.

i simply loosened ALL the screws just a little, then placed the frame on a flat surface. It leveled out and, while holding the frame down from the top, I tightened the screws. This ensured that the frame stayed level while I tightened the screws up.

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Yes, that was one of the first things I tried during the initial assembly as I stated above, and it did not work. Also, see my comment on the first answer in this thread. I clamped down the frame on a flat surface and was able to minimize the gap to .2 mm.

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Same issue with wobble. I used a reference surface (flat within 3 microns) to check. I tried loosening and re-tightening in a number of different patterns with steady downward pressure and the wobble diminished, but didn’t disappear. I was able to get the gap down to 0.3mm and then decided that was good enough. I think you could probably chase this type of problem forever and drive yourself crazy. I decided to get at close as possible and move on. We’ll see how it goes when I start printing.

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I am having the exact same issue. No matter what I try it rocks. Tell you engineers they are morons and should be stripped of their degrees.

I have had faulty parts sent to me, incorrect replacement parts sent to me and now this. Im starting to think Prusa is run by a bunch of students from a clown college

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Hmm, did you try loosening the frame screws and putting the frame on a level plane? @kaisk seems to have gotten that to work. It worked for me too, although my shaking issue wasn't too bad.

Also, what parts were faulty? The 3D-printed ones or the metal ones?

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Hey Mozz,

If you believe you've received faulty parts, then please do not hesitate to contact us for troubleshooting/replacements.

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Darrel will be eternally grateful.
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