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  1. Please prepare tools for this chapter:
    • Please prepare tools for this chapter:

    • 2.5mm Allen key for M3 screws

  2. This guide is describing an assembly of a single spool holder. Your package should include 5, simply repeat all the steps again until you finish all spool holders.
    • This guide is describing an assembly of a single spool holder. Your package should include 5, simply repeat all the steps again until you finish all spool holders.

    • Take the black plastic spool holder base and turn it upside down.

    • Using cloth + detergent or IPA clean all four corners from dust and grease.

    • Let the surface fully dry and proceed to the next step.

    Ohhh, Is that what they are. I actually thought they were nice holders provided for parts and screws during installation. Hah!

    Chris tenDen - Reply

    Same here Chris! They worked really well for holding parts, even if it wasn't their official job! The instructions should probably suggest that, they’re so convenient

    Patrick Leiser - Reply

    What they said. Kinda disappointed they aren’t 3d printed.

    craigosbo@gmail.com - Reply

    Well, it saves us a lot of manufacturing capacity, meaning we can make more printers and upgrades. : )

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Explain to people why you clean the back from oil - So the adhesive will stick - long term.

    David - Reply

    Yes, that is correct, David!

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Just an amusing anecdote more than anything— it took me a moment to realize you mean Isopropyl Alcohol and not an Indian Pale Ale. I was like “What does beer have to do with this?” and then five seconds later realized I was wrong, haha.

    Kar - Reply

    Grr. I destroyed one of the plastics thinking this was just package material. You should have warned at the start!

    Frank Tamminga - Reply

    Hello Frank. Package material? But.. it is shown from the beginning as a spoolholder, and there was nothing in it. Anyhow, see prusaprinters.org or Thingiverse, there is plenty of alternative spool holder designs.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

  3. For each spool holder base prepare 4 foam pads. Peel off the yellow protective film completely. Stick the foam pad on the bottom of the spool holder base and hold it for a while. DON'T use too much force, you might deform the plastic shell.
    • For each spool holder base prepare 4 foam pads.

    • Peel off the yellow protective film completely.

    • Stick the foam pad on the bottom of the spool holder base and hold it for a while. DON'T use too much force, you might deform the plastic shell.

    • The foam pads are important to increase contact between the spool holder base and the surface underneath and reduce the spool holder from moving.

    Proposed procedure: Stick on all 4 pads and turn arount the plastic base, then press all 4 corners with thumb and forefinger of both hands. This way you can apply more pressure without any risk of derformation.

    R. Moeller - Reply

    Or you could just carefully rotate the spool holder 180 degrees and apply an even force using a thin book on top of the spool holder.

    Miguel Barroso - Reply

    I intend to drill holes in the spool holder bases and screw them all to a piece of wood.

    James Bryant - Reply

  4. Let's assemble the shafts holding the spools, you will need: Bearings (4x)
    • Let's assemble the shafts holding the spools, you will need:

    • Bearings (4x)

    • Shaft (2x)

    • Shafts can be black or silver, the dimensions are the same.

    Put one side of the rubber end stops on first before the bearings. It is easier. Then slide on the two bearing and other end stop.

    mrrparker@yahoo.com - Reply

    My bearings didn’t have black seals. Guess it’s okay anyway…

    Miguel Barroso - Reply

    Hi Miguel,

    Yes it is OK, no worries about the color.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

  5. Align the bearing with the end of the shaft. Assemble bearings on both sides of the shaft.
    • Align the bearing with the end of the shaft.

    • Assemble bearings on both sides of the shaft.

    • The rubber seals next to the bearing were used for the purpose of the photography, no need to use them.

  6. For the following steps, please prepare: spool holder base (1x)
    • For the following steps, please prepare:

    • spool holder base (1x)

    • shaft with bearings (2x)

    • mmu2-s-holder-endstop (4x)

    1 holder missing on my package

    bonora.e@proxicad.it - Reply

    My upgrade from MK3+MMU2 to MK3S+MMU2S did not include any “mmu2-s-holder-endstop“.

    I am guessing they are somehow better than the black little hats that kept falling that I have.

    can I print them myself? where can I find the CAD files for them ? and what material is recommended?

    Eyal Peleg - Reply

    Hi Eyal, those are only part of full and new MMU2/S upgrade kit. They are injection molded from rubber, you might not be able to print them properly. The old, black endstops are easy to print if needed.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

  7. Rotate the base with the cutout part towards you. Insert the shafts into the spool holder base. Make sure all four bearings are seated properly.
    • Rotate the base with the cutout part towards you.

    • Insert the shafts into the spool holder base. Make sure all four bearings are seated properly.

    • Insert the endstops in all four sockets. Push them all the way in, but make sure you won't deform the spool holder base.

    • Make sure the shafts can rotate freely.

    I think it would be better to tell the people to insert the endstops outside of the spool holder to eliminate the risk of damaging it.

    Jens Schubert - Reply

    Hello Jens, what do you mean by “outside of the spool holder“? You can only insert the endstops to into the shaft, there’s no other option.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    I agree that since the rolling assembly is just resting in the base and it can be lifted out or inserted into the base after assembly, it is easier to assemble the shafts with 2 bearings and end-stops before putting them into the base.

    Jared Ressler -

    I see,well, it does not really matter at which point you insert the endstops. We thought it’s most practical to insert them as we describe, but feel free to do it your way. :)

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Odd.. seeing as inserting them when in the base is the least practical way considering you can hold them in your hand.

    Graeme O'Brien -

    I totally agree with Jens and Jared. It’s so much faster to put two bearings on a spool, insert the endpoints, (do this 9 more times), and then put them in the spool holders.

    Chris - Reply

    Agreed. Especially to avoid risking damaging the holder

    Hanan Ricketts - Reply

    I’ve have s-holder-base, s-holder-lever-a and s-holder-lever-b parts but no assembly instructions here

    Gerry Campbell - Reply

    That is because we don’t use those anymore. We recommend using the buffer instead.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    The one thing I have no spares for is the one thing I’m missing… an endstop.

    craigosbo@gmail.com - Reply

    Hi Craig, please contact our customer support if something was missing from the kit.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    The bearings sit loose in these spoolholders, they do not pop in but have about 2mm room. So they wobble around in the spool holder and the whole thing falls apart easily.

    Is this the design or are the gaps in the spoolholder parts I got too large?

    or do my bearings have a too large outer diameter?

    Should the bearings not pop into the black plastic parts?

    Thomas - Reply

    Hi Thomas, you need to insert them just like on the pictures. You might need to push a bit.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Like Thomas, mine are completely loose. There is no applicabable “push.” since the bearings are 22.0mm while the smallest part of the opening (measured at its top) is 22.6mm. Gravity should hold it in, but it is gravity alone in my case at least.

    Dennis Lovelady -

    Hi Dennis,

    These parts are moulded, so it is possible they have wider tolerances. Don’t worry about it though, the weight of the spool will put them in place.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    You should instruct people not to confuse the rubber end-stops with gummy bears. If someone eats the end-stops they will have to call customer care to get new ones (and perhaps even a doctor)… :-)

    tomas.repisky@seznam.cz - Reply

    Tried inserting endstops with the shaft and bearings both in the base and outside it, didn’t really seem much of a difference in difficulty between the two methods. Have noticed that the final assembly pic for the holder appears to have the shafts cut to a minimum, with the endstops neatly butting up against the bearing. In my case the shafts have extra length and this is obviously because of the play in how the bearings sit in the holder. If the pic also showed this difference on one the shafts in the pic (I know it wouldn’t look as neat and tidy) it would help to understand that this extra “play” is ok.

    Martin Gara - Reply

    How hard is it to say

    end cap.

    two bearings .

    end cap.

    Place in base.

    Graeme O'Brien - Reply

  8. For the following steps, please prepare: M3x40 screw (10x)
    • For the following steps, please prepare:

    • M3x40 screw (10x)

    • M3x12 screw (10x)

    • M3n nut (10x)

    • Buffer plate (6x)

    • PTFE tube 4x2x150 mm (5x)

    • The list continues in the next step.

    • The Buffer plates are protected by a thin protective film on one or both sides, you can remove it now. Be careful during the assembly to avoid scratches.

    I have 65cm ptfe in my kit

    Jasper Tielen - Reply

    Hey Jasper, it’s the longer PTFE that we supplied with older MMU2 kits. You can cut it to shorter size for the buffer.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    I didn’t find any foil on the plates I received

    Peter tucker - Reply

    Hi Peter, well that just means less work for you :)

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    I was confused as well, it is not foil (which is typically metal) it is actually that really thin transparent plastic film that comes on LCD screens and shiny plastic parts when you buy something.

    Nathan Chasen -

    Nathan, thanks for the explanation, you are right, of course! We’ll check the translation and correct it.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    No cover on my plates. They are in good shape, no scratches, so I guess it is ok.

    Joe O. - Reply

    My plates had the static cling plastic covers.

    Michael Barnhart - Reply

    My kit was supplied with 10mm screws instead of 12mm. It seems they do not have any influence on the tubes.

    Malcolm Bastron - Reply

  9. Open the bag with the plastic parts and look for the hooks. There are two versions:
    • Open the bag with the plastic parts and look for the hooks. There are two versions:

    • New version with a longer hook compatible with MK3S and MK2.5S. Please jump to the Step 10

    • Old version with a shorter hook compatible only with MK3S. Please jump to the Step 15

    • All printable parts are also available at prusa3d.com/prusa-i3-printable-parts

    The longer hook was not included in my MK2.5S to MMU2S upgrade kit. If I finish the upgrade without the buffer, will I be able to calibrate the printer and then print the hook in single material mode?

    Don Carpenter - Reply

    Hello Mr Carpenter,

    Yes, you definitely will be able to print it after the assembly.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS - Reply

    But even better to print it before disassembling the printer.

    W. Craig Trader - Reply

    How do I know which I have? The hooks are not labled with part numbers and they are all called s-xxxxxx

    Michael Barnhart - Reply

    Figured it out. The new version has 4 spacers and 2 hooks while the old version has 3 spacers and 3 hooks.

    Michael Barnhart -

    My kit didn’t include either hook; long or short.

    Tim C - Reply

    Hello Tim,

    Did you check all of the bags and boxes? If the parts are really missing, take a photo of the parts you did receive, send them in an an email and we’ll help you out. : )

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Prusa does a lot of very good designs, the MMU Buffer is not one of them. Do yourself a solid, and print this thing: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:360635... instead. Uses screws & plates of the original, but is way easier to load, without hurting your fingers, and does not compromise on function.

    Mario Roither - Reply

    Hi Mario,

    Thanks for sharing this design, we’ll test it too. :)

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Mario, now that looks totally awsome - will take some time to print but I am going for it. Thank you for sharing this. I think Prusa should embed this into his design even if it would meen to pay the author for a license or whatever. I especially like the fact that it is a closed design!

    tomas.repisky@seznam.cz -

    What are these hooks for?

    JACOB BOERMAN - Reply

    Hi Jacob, they are used to secure the buffer to the printer’s frame.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

  10. s-buffer-printer (1x) s-buffer-spools (1x)
    • s-buffer-printer (1x)

    • s-buffer-spools (1x)

    • s-buffer-spacer (4x)

    • s-buffer-hook-uni (2x)

    • As the names suggest, there are parts, which will connect to the printer or to the spools.

    • IMPORTANT: the holes for the PTFE tubes have to match between both parts. See the picture. Make sure you won't flip them.

    • On one side you have 3 holes, same goes for the second printed part.

    • Other side has only 2 holes.

    I have 3 hooks and 3 spacers, which seems wrong…

    John Olsen - Reply

    Mr Olsen, yes it does, we are so sorry! Luckily you can use the hook as a spacer (you can for example cut the hook part from it with an exacto knife). Or you can print yourself an extra spacer.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    It looks like the old version has 3 and 3, while the new version has 4 and 2 - spacers to hooks.

    Michael Barnhart -

    I have NONE of these things in my MMU2s box.. not a single one. I have the buffer “plates”, but none of these parts.

    Kieran Short - Reply

    Hi Kieran,

    If you have ordered an upgrade kit which should contain those parts, then please contact our customer support to arrange replacements.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    For me, the set is incomplete, 3 spacers + 2 hooks. How can we solve this?

    Karsten Kornitschuk - Reply

    Hello Karsten,

    Please double check inside the boxes and bags. If you won’t find the missing spacer, then please contact us via email (info@prusa3d.com).

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

  11. Take the larger printed part (s-buffer-printer) and place it like in the picture with two holes facing to the right. Prepare something slightly heavy and tall (e.g. empty glass), we will use it in a second. Grab one plate and slide it in, it will fit in the slot.
    • Take the larger printed part (s-buffer-printer) and place it like in the picture with two holes facing to the right.

    • Prepare something slightly heavy and tall (e.g. empty glass), we will use it in a second.

    • Grab one plate and slide it in, it will fit in the slot.

    • Make sure the surface with previously removed protective film is facing towards you.

    • The entire assembly will have a tendency to fall over, use the prepared object to support it from behind.

    • Slide another 5 plates in the printed part. Make sure the surfaces with previously removed protective films are facing towards you.

    • Use two M3x40 screws and push them through the printed part. Ensure the screws are all the way through.

    • Don't turn the Buffer yet.

    Ich habe gar keine Schutzfolie.

    Lothar Schlüter - Reply

    Hallo Herr Schlüter.

    Die Folie ist nicht notwendig, Sie können gerne auch ohne Folie fortfahren.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Since my plates did not have film covering, I’m not sure which side should be facing me. I did notice that the plates are NOT symmetrical. I turned a few around so all edges are aligned. The screws were difficult to push through, but I was successful.

    Joe O. - Reply

    Hello Joe,

    the matt side should be facing down. Also keep in mins that the long PTFE tubes should not be interfering with the MMU and extruder cables, they should be at the PSU side of the printer (may vary based on your setup).

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    My plates had film on both sides of each plate. The only discernible difference between one side of a plate and the other is that one side has a slightly rougher edge where the sheets were punched / cut from the original plate material. I assume it should suffice to have all of the plates oriented similarly.

    W. Craig Trader - Reply

    Same as Craig, all plates had protective film on them. Though my plates are symmetrical. I pulled the film off both sides, hopefully it still works as intended…

    Chris Vahi - Reply

    Step 8 says the film can be removed, but this step talks about the film still being on. Doesn’t anyone ever review these instructions before publishing them? This isn’t the first time Prusa instructions have given conflicting steps.

    EdB - Reply

    Hi Ed, yes the instructions are checked before being released. In this step I used past tense => “removed” indicating the film is already gone. To make things clear, the text was further adjusted.

    Jakub Dolezal -

    “Make sure the surface with previously removed protective film is facing towards you. “

    Even after reading all the comments where people did and did not have said protective film (I did not have it) I do not understand what is supposed to be the difference between the two sides and which side should be place towards me. Is it just a matter of aesthetics or is there any functional importance to this?

    Eyal Peleg - Reply

    Hello Eyal,

    It’s cosmetics only :)

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

    Here is what I would suggest: For the first plate, remove the protective film from one side and keep the film on the side facing away from you. Remove the film from both sides for the next three plates before you put them in place. Then with the last one, remove it from the side facing away from you and toward the inside of the box. The reason is that the film will help protect the surfaces from scratches. When you have completed the build, remove the film from the first and last pieces.

    Ray Benjamin - Reply

    Thanks, that clarifies it for me.

    Doug -

    You might suggest a bottle of isopropyl alcohol instead of an empty glass, since I assume we all have one of those handy. :)

    Bruce Lucas - Reply

    Hi Bruce, good idea! A bottle of isopropyl alcohol will certainly do. :)

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Bottles of Isopropyl Alcohol are made out of unobtainium these days. I am using a Hydro Flask.

    Bob Moragues -

    Film on both sides of my plates as well. No worries, just remove ALL film and assemble. Makes no difference.

    ben_r_ - Reply

  12. Arrange the plates on top of the  Buffer and slide in the second printed part (s-buffer-spools). Make sure the side with two holes is on the right. Seat the printed part on the other side as well.
    • Arrange the plates on top of the Buffer and slide in the second printed part (s-buffer-spools).

    • Make sure the side with two holes is on the right.

    • Seat the printed part on the other side as well.

    • Secure the printed part using two screws M3x40.

    • Don't turn the Buffer yet.

    Why pushing the screws it helps to hold another one outside so you can see how deep you are already so you can know which plate to play with so the screw will find the next hole and go through it.

    Eyal Peleg - Reply

    also one of the screws refused to get into the nut and I had to move the top part and put the screw and nut into it without the plates thus pulling the nut into its socket and then removed the screw, re-placed on the plates and now the screw was able to catch onto the nut.

    Eyal Peleg - Reply

  13. Now turn the Buffer and place four nuts on the screws. Before you start tightening, please read the following instructions: DON'T TIGHTEN the screws too firmly. You will deform the plates and the Buffer might not work properly. Make sure the plates are parallel and not bent. It is enough just to catch the nut (use its entire internal thread).
    • Now turn the Buffer and place four nuts on the screws. Before you start tightening, please read the following instructions:

    • DON'T TIGHTEN the screws too firmly. You will deform the plates and the Buffer might not work properly. Make sure the plates are parallel and not bent.

    • It is enough just to catch the nut (use its entire internal thread).

    • Use this approach on all parts, which are holding the plates.

    The hex shaped nut pocket on the s-buffers-spools par was deformed and would not allow the nut to seat properly. I ended up cracking the part from the corner or the hex to the edge. I don’t think that I will need to print a replacement part..

    Bob Moragues - Reply

  14. Turn the Buffer back, two holes are facing to the right again. Take three s-buffer-spacer parts and place them on the side with two holes. Secure each s-buffer-spacer with a M3x40 screw.
    • Turn the Buffer back, two holes are facing to the right again.

    • Take three s-buffer-spacer parts and place them on the side with two holes.

    • Secure each s-buffer-spacer with a M3x40 screw.

    • Take two s-buffer-hook-uni parts and place them on the other side. This position of hooks is compatible both with MK3S and MK2.5S, but you can rearrange it.

    • Take the last s-buffer-spacer and place it to the corner.

    • Secure each printer part with a M3x40 screw.

    • Use six M3n nuts from the other side and tighten the screws. Keep in mind the proper tightening. Avoid deforming the plates!

    • Now, skip to the Step 20.

    Next step is 19 not 20

    Harvey Neal - Reply

    Hi Harvey, step 19 is for adding hooks with the old version.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    What the heck do the hooks actually hook to? I have yet to find an image or documentation for it. Or am i just totally missing it??

    Andrew Siemer - Reply

    Hello Andrew , Please refer to the Placement and setup chapter in the Handbook. There are even photos of what the ideal setup should look like.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    On one picture you feature three hooks. On the other you feature two.

    Jeffrey Foley - Reply

    Jeffrey, that is correct. Please read the description of step 9. One there are two versions, an older one and a newer one.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    No matter where on the rear of the frame I try to hook it, it interferes with bed movement. The only picture I could find didn't show how it should be attached.

    Andy - Reply

    Hi Andy, please refer to the printed handbook you have received with the MMU. On page 7, there is a photo of the correct setup from above.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    The print quality of my parts was pretty bad and not what I am used to from Prusa. Needed to do quite som filing to get everything smoothly in place.

    Jan Albiez - Reply

    Yea the S-Buffer-Spacers werent even near a close fit, so I got them lined up with all the holes as close as I could tapping on the Buffer with a very small hammer. Once they were close and I could start inserting the M3x40mm bolts I used a small C-Clamp to force the bolt through the holes by screwing it tighter and tighter. Worked perfectly.

    ben_r_ - Reply

    The print quality of these parts was very bad compared to the rest of the MMU2S parts. There were visible defects from overhangs, which I had to smooth with a small chisel. I spent over an hour just trying to get these parts to fit. I suggest printing them on a finer setting, using the SL1 to print them, or use other means of manufacturing because this was far too difficult to assemble.

    M S - Reply

    Is it worthwhile, since the nuts should not be too tight, to use locknuts, or low strength Loctite, to prevent them from vibrating loose?

    James Bryant - Reply

    Hi, there’s no need to apply it.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

    Lucian Capeleanu - Reply

  15. s-buffer-spacer (3x) s-buffer-spacer-hook (3x)
    • s-buffer-spacer (3x)

    • s-buffer-spacer-hook (3x)

    • s-buffer-printer (1x)

    • s-buffer-spools (1x)

    • As the names suggest, there are parts, which will connect to the printer or to the spools.

    • IMPORTANT: the holes for the PTFE tubes have to match between both parts. See the picture. Make sure you won't flip them.

    • On one side you have 3 holes, same goes for the second printed part.

    • Other side has only 2 holes.

  16. Take the larger printed part (s-buffer-printer) and place it like in the picture with two holes facing to the right. Prepare something slightly heavy and tall (e.g. empty glass), we will use it in a second. Grab one plate and slide it in, it will fit in the slot.
    • Take the larger printed part (s-buffer-printer) and place it like in the picture with two holes facing to the right.

    • Prepare something slightly heavy and tall (e.g. empty glass), we will use it in a second.

    • Grab one plate and slide it in, it will fit in the slot.

    • Make sure the surface with removed protective film is facing towards you.

    • The entire assembly will have a tendency to fall over, use the prepared object to support it from behind.

    • Slide another 5 plates in the printed part. Make sure the surface with removed protective film is facing towards you.

    • Use two M3x40 screws and push them through the printed part. Ensure the screws are all the way through.

    • Don't turn the Buffer yet.

    Remeber it says holes not slots where the arrow stands.

    Jasper Tielen - Reply

    I got a lot of static cling after removing the protective film and starting collecting dust immediately. I gently wiped the plates with a dryer (anti-static) sheet, no force applied to avoid scratches, to help resolve this. Warning: It is very easy to scratch these plates so be careful.

    Kevin W - Reply

    The last plate you fit (closest to you) should be turned the opposite way from the others so that the surface with removed protective foil is facing away from you to ensure that smooth surfaces are internal

    Gordon Blair - Reply

    The six plates seem to have a side where the protective foil is removed and a side where the foil is (still) present. So the instruction “Make sure the surface with removed protective foil is facing towards you.” could be interpreted as if the side with the foil (still) present should be facing away from the maker. I guess this is not what is meant by this instruction. Maybe replace it with “Remove the protective foil and let this side face towards you.”

    Arie de Hond - Reply

    Hello Arie,

    Thanks for the remark, we will check this.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    My plates did not have a protective film. However, they are also not symmetrical, so I turned all the plates around until the edges were all lined up. The rest of the assembly went fine.

    Joe O. - Reply

  17. Arrange the plates on top of the  Buffer and slide in the second printed part (s-buffer-spools). Make sure the side with two holes is on the right. Seat the printed part on the other side as well.
    • Arrange the plates on top of the Buffer and slide in the second printed part (s-buffer-spools).

    • Make sure the side with two holes is on the right.

    • Seat the printed part on the other side as well.

    • Secure the printed part using two screws M3x40.

    • Don't turn the Buffer yet.

  18. Now turn the Buffer and place four nuts on the screws. Before you start tightening, please read the following instructions: DON'T TIGHTEN the screws too firmly. You will deform the plates and the Buffer might not work properly. Make sure the plates are parallel and not bent. It is enough just to catch the nut (use its entire internal thread).
    • Now turn the Buffer and place four nuts on the screws. Before you start tightening, please read the following instructions:

    • DON'T TIGHTEN the screws too firmly. You will deform the plates and the Buffer might not work properly. Make sure the plates are parallel and not bent.

    • It is enough just to catch the nut (use its entire internal thread).

    • Use this approach on all parts, which are holding the plates.

    It is easier to take two of the smaller corner spacer to separate the plates first . You can just put then on either side temporarily and then slide the big top piece in..

    mrrparker@yahoo.com - Reply

    The top part broke before I could get the bolt half way into the nut. Oops. For now it’s still functional and I guess I’ll print another one eventually.

    Jason Tibbitts - Reply

    Hi Jason,

    Sorry to hear that! Yes, you an use any material in this case.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

  19. Turn the Buffer back, two holes are facing to the right again. Take three s-buffer-spacer parts and place them on the side with two holes. Secure each s-buffer-spacer with a M3x40 screw.
    • Turn the Buffer back, two holes are facing to the right again.

    • Take three s-buffer-spacer parts and place them on the side with two holes.

    • Secure each s-buffer-spacer with a M3x40 screw.

    • Take three s-buffer-spacer-hook parts and place them on the other side.

    • Secure each s-buffer-spacer-hook with a M3x40 screw.

    • Use six M3n nuts from the other side and tighten the screws. Keep in mind the proper tightening. Avoid deforming the plates!

    It is not so easy to insert, try inserting from the top, where there are close to the holder with two holes and then slide to the correct position where the holes are

    Xep - Reply

    The first step should surely include removing the protective film from both sides of the plates?

    Roger Froud - Reply

    Hi Roger, please see step 8, read the instructions carefully. ;)

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Step 8 just says remove the film. It doesn’t mention that there is film on both sides. Needs correction!

    Mark -

    Hi Mark,

    Thank you for the feedback, we’ll look into changing that information.

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

  20. Take the 150mm PTFE tubes and slide them in to the smaller of the two printed parts. Make sure the PTFE tube sticks out on the other side (inside the Buffer) just 2-3 mm, not more. Secure the PTFE tubes using five M3x12 screws. You can tighten them slightly above the surface.
    • Take the 150mm PTFE tubes and slide them in to the smaller of the two printed parts. Make sure the PTFE tube sticks out on the other side (inside the Buffer) just 2-3 mm, not more.

    • Secure the PTFE tubes using five M3x12 screws. You can tighten them slightly above the surface.

    • CHECK EACH PTFE TUBE with a piece of filament to ensure it can move smoothly inside the tube. If not, release the screw a bit.

    The instruction above at Step 14 indicates that M3x10 screws are used to secure the short PTFE tubes to the buffer.The screws in the Buffer bag are in fact M3x12. I assume then that the instructions are incorrect in terms of screw size.

    Steve Jones - Reply

    Hello Steve, perhaps the screws got mixed up a little bit. You can always use screws from the spare bag.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Hi Filip,

    There were 10 M3 x 12 screws in the buffer bag so I’d say the intention was to use these for the PTFE tube retention.

    Perhaps Jakub can review and amend instructions as appropriate.

    Steve Jones -

    Filip- There was no mix up. The screws are, in fact, M3X12. They work fine, though.

    Joe O. -

    Small thing but I know you care about getting the English right: “the smaller from two printed parts” should read “the smaller of the two printed parts”.

    Mark Wheadon - Reply

    Hey Mark, thanks - good catch. We’ll fix it.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Even without inserting the screws the filament doesn't go smoothly through the ptfe tubes after having been inserted into the holes. It's basically as if the ptfe tubes gets compressed a bit in the holes and pinch/block the filament.

    Ricky - Reply

    Hello Ricky, please inspect those holes - perhaps there’s some material buildup and you might need to remove it.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Considering the importance of a good clearance for the filaments inside the PTFE tubes, this step should be done before Step 11. This way you can have a visual of how deep the PTFE tubes are and how tight the screws should be

    Lionel Chacon - Reply

    Hi Lionel,

    We’ve found it to be the most optimal way to assemble the buffer.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Totally agree, pushing the PTFE into the printed part while It is off the buffer assembly allows for the exact depth of all the tubes. It also makes it easier to locate any pinch points or plastic ‘dags’ preventing free flowing filament.

    I also used a 4mm drill bit and BY HAND honed the tube holes clearing out any obfuscating plastic bits. NOTE: “BY HAND”

    After this the PTFE tubes fit perfect and allowed the filament to move without any resistance. The 12mm retaining screws sat just short of flush with the printed part preventing any movement of the PTFE tubes. Beautiful

    Rick -

    Apparently, the hole in the printed part is build up from two holes, one behind the other and with their center lines at a small angle. This causes the PTFE tube -when installed without the bolts- to be bend. The bend is preventing smooth filament movement.

    After installation of the bolts, fully tightened as shown in the pictures, the bolt and deformation of the printed part do cause the center lines of the two holes to be aligned and thus straighten the PTFE tube. Result; smooth movement!

     The error in the manual is the statement: “If not, release the screw a bit”. Apparently, the contrary is true.

     In step 19 the printed part can be removed temporarily for installation of the PTFE tubes. Now, during tightening of the bolts look inside the PTFE tube and observe the round tube shape; no deformation can be observed! If deformation is observed; then release the screw a bit!

    TopBob - Reply

    Hi TopBob,

    thanks for the feedback. You need to always check, the filament can pass through the PTFE tube without significant resistance. However, the path between PTFE tubes shouldn't be “direct” as during the unload you need the filament to get certain level of resistance inside the Buffer, bend and stay inside. If you make adjustments and the filament slides out to the spool, then the buffer lost its purpose.

    Jakub Dolezal -

    Odd thing that happened, dunno if that’s due to me printing this in PLA: Four of the six M3x12 screws (the top ones) were too short to actually pinch and fix the PTFE tubes even when screwed all the way in, so I had to use M3x20s (it seems Prusa doesn’t use M3x16s, I looked through my whole spares bag! ;-)…

    Daniel K. - Reply

    Hi Daniel, M3x12 should be sufficient. It sounds like a badly printed part, but it seems the problem got solved anyway :)

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    I got all the right bolts, but my PTFE tubes are inconsistent. It looks like I received 2 pieces 4mm x 2mm x 150mm and 3 pieces 4mm x 1.85mm x 150mm. The difference in drag is quite noticeable, even without the fixing bolts installed. Given how sensitive the original MMU2 setup was to PTFE drag this leaves me a little concerned. I have extra PTFE on hand but maybe you want to alert your packaging crew.

    Chris Vahi - Reply

    Hi Chris, are you sure the other pair is smaller? Perhaps the tube is damaged around the entrance, making you think it’s overall tighter.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    suggestion:

    a small piece of plastic that has the required depth hole and can act as a stopper by be held from the side while inserting the PTFE Tube would be nice.

    Question: seeing that I don’t have such a tool, please explain what should I expect with those tubes?

    when I start pushing them into the hole there is some point of resistance, should I push past that point? or stop before it?

    having pushed past that point of resistance, it becomes a point of resistance when trying to insert a filament into the tube - is this expected? is this desired? Is the screw supposed to remove this resistance?

    basically I am lost with this not knowing what to expect nor how to tune this.

    Eyal Peleg - Reply

    Hello,

    No, the PTFE tubes should be tightened just slightly by the screws and the filament has to slide through without any friction.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    The filament wasn't staying in the buffer for me, it would create a loop and entangle and I'd lose a layer, longer screws helped my filament stay in the buffer

    Stephen Harbin -

    I mostly agree with Lionel & Rick, I would advise that the “S-buffer-spools” only be held by the 40mm screws for the rest of assembly (ie steps 13,14,19) and removed to make this step feasible.

    This would prevent a) toomuch ptfe tube inside buffer and b) damage to tubes from overtightening the screws (as I did)

    Jonathan Tall - Reply

    I originally had a comment saying that you could use latex/nitrile gloves to help push the tube in if you have trouble. I deleted this comment because you shouldn’t do this.

    If you have trouble pushing in the tube, then the hole is too small. If you jam in the tube in this situation, the part will crush the tube, and cause the filament to bind. You want the friction in the tube to be as low as possible to prevent jams. Take a 5/32” bit and carefully clear out the hole to allow the tube.

    Jeff Gros - Reply

    I did the exact same thing using a /32” bit. I would recommend applying slight pressure toward where the tightening screw hole is. The reason for this is applying pressure the other way (away from the screw hole) makes the tube move away from the tightening screw when widening the tube hole making it hard to secure the tube with the screw.

    Matthew Starr -

    Picture is missing of the finished WHOLE product — add that — And add the last open side with hooks - as I only got 2/3 part with hooks.

    David - Reply

    Thanks for suggestions.

    Martini H. - Official Prusa CS -

    So why does the manual (page 7) show the tubes on the large end instead of the small one as shown here? I would think building it like shown in the manual would make loading filament much easier.

    Dana Franklin - Reply

    Hello Dana, you might have an older version of the printed manual. In case of discrepancy, always follow this online version.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    I chased the holes with a 4mm drill bit because all the holes had strings or boogers in them. I would suggest that be done to these parts at the factory to insure the tubes go in with distorting them. Or else supply a 4mm drill bit in the tool kit.

    Mark - Reply

    I had to replace these 12mm screws with 14mm screws in order to get the buffer to work correctly. The 12mm screws did not allow enough adjustment to add a bit of resistance to the filament being drawn through. The resistance at these points is what makes the buffer work, making it easier to loop instead of feed back to the spools. To adjust the resistance I ran a piece of filament through and tightened the screw until some resistance was felt when moving the filament back and forth in the tubes, then gave the screws another half-turn or so. During my first multi-color print, I fine tuned the adjustments on filaments that were tending to feed back to the spools, and it works perfectly.

    On the output side of the buffer, when you attach the tubes that go to the MMU, you want as little friction as possible, and tightened just enough to hold the tubes, but not add resistance to the filament travel. I’m still using the 12mm screws on the output side.

    Mark - Reply

    100% agree with the drilling a clear path route. It’s made a world of difference and there is only slight, *consistent* friction from filament to PFTE tube now

    Mike - Reply

    Thank you for your feedback Mike!

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    This is how it worked for me with no friction and secured PTFE tubes:

    - I carefully chased the holes with a 4mm bit, without doing this I even had a lot of friction when they where not secured.

    - 12mm bolts don’t catch anymore now so I used 14mm, you can use longer ones as well. Just be carefull!

    - I FIRST inserted all the 14mm bolts BEFORE the PTFE tubes are inserted. I constantly tried to see if I could still insert the PTFE tube while screwing in the bolts, as soon I was unable to insert the tube, I unscrewed it a bit.

    - Now I insert the PTFE tube and align it propperly, then I secure it with the bolt (by turning only 90° at a time) and constantly testing friction with some filament.

    Hope this helps :)

    Tom Meysen - Reply

    I am about to fit the five tubes to the buffer, but have noticed that 3 of the 5 are slightly kinked.

    Is there a recommened way to straighten the tube, or does it not matter?

    Les Grosvenor - Reply

    Hello Les, it doesn’t matter as long as you don’t damage the tube (for example crush it with tools).

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

  21. That was easy, right?
    • That was easy, right?

    • Spool holders and Buffer are easy to make, research shows that 10 % is enough.

    WHERE ARE MY HARIBOs! They weren’t included in my upgrade kit!

    EdB - Reply

  22. Did you assemble all five spool holders and the Buffer? Do they look like those in the photo? Note that the hooks on the buffer will differ depending on your version.
    • Did you assemble all five spool holders and the Buffer?

    • Do they look like those in the photo? Note that the hooks on the buffer will differ depending on your version.

    • There are 5 screws (M3x12) remaining, keep them for connecting the printer tubes to the buffer, later while reading the Handbook.

    • Now, just a 8. Preflight check and the MMU2S is ready!

    Didn’t you mis a ptfe at the bottom?

    Jasper Tielen - Reply

    Hey Jasper, what exactly do you have in mind?

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    is there a step missing here - no where does it say to attach the longer ptfe tube that connect the buffer to the MMU2 unit (and to screw them in).

    jfearnside@gmail.com - Reply

    Hello, do you mean the green bullet of the Step 14 ?

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Prusa team, you guys are missing the part of connecting the the PTFE tubes from the MMU2S unit to the buffer unit.

    Also, one side of the buffer unit has like hooks on it. Is it supposed to be resting/connected to the printer somehow?

    Moshe Dahan - Reply

    See 3D printing Handbook, section 3. I do agree with you and posters though that this information would be better suited as step 17.

    Jeff Gros -

    Hi Moshe,

    The Preflight Check mentions to check the handbook on how to set up the buffer properly.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Section 3 of the handbook doesn’t make it clear enough how to attach the buffer to the printer - it just says ‘attach it to the frame using the built in clips. Pay attention to the correct orientation of the buffer’.

    Its not clear to me whether the clips should go under the printer frame or over the top. If I put them over the top of the frame then the buffer attaches fairly securely but the buffer is then the wrong way round. If I put the clips under the frame then the buffer is not very secure and moves around quite easily.

    Possibly i’ve attached the clips the wrong way but i’m not sure. I thought i’d followed the instructions.

    Could someone clarify whether the clips go over or under the printer frame?

    Paul Green -

    Hey Paul, the hooks should be on the bottom. You can clearly see it on the pictures in the handbook: https://prusa3d.com/downloads/manual/pru...

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Thanks Filip, It is much clearer in the online version of the manual. At least I built it correctly.

    Paul Green -

    It is quite useful to have a link to the 3D Printer Manual, but for it to be buried deep in the comments is not very helpful. Much better to provide link at the top of the section

    Jumping back and forth between seperate documents is conducive to ending up in the wrong guide; the need to clear the resulting fog of confusion is a hindrance we would prefer to avoid.

    The absence of a few installation arrangement images in this build guide is a serious omission which should to be rectified without further delay.

    Les Grosvenor -

    The Filament numbers really needs to be modeled into both printed ptfe holders. The PETG doesn’t really take permanent markers or paint markers very well, and there arn’t really any identifying marks. Also the setup of the buffer needs to be included in the online manual not just the handbook.

    Kenneth Buckingham - Reply

    The single picture in the handbook does very little to help in figuring out witch printer ptfe tube goes where, it only shows filament side.

    Kenneth Buckingham -

    Hello Kenneth, thank you for your suggestion, we will consider this. As for the handbook, the new version it will be included in the new updated version.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    In reference to the marking of the numbers; I use a label maker to make labels for which filament is which 1-5 the labels stick well to the PETG. You could even use any type of self adhesive to write the numbers on. I label the trays on the spool holders, the MMU, and now I will label the buffer.

    Ricky Burnett - Reply

    Image shows 3 S-Buffer-Spacer-Hooks, which is from the Old Version. The New Version only has two.

    ben_r_ - Reply

Finish Line

619 other people completed this guide.

Jakub Dolezal

Member since: 02/20/2017

235 Guides authored

Team

Prusa Research Member of Prusa Research

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377 Guides authored

45 Comments

I’ve had a few days to play with the buffer now. It’s a neat idea, but trying to load filament is a nightmare. I look at picture 9 in the handbook and I laugh in frustration.

Filament spends its life on a spool and will naturally want to bend. I cannot get it from one side of the buffer to the other without curving out the side somewhere else. I can change the orientation of the spool before feeding, trying to take advantage of the bend. But it will just shoot out a different (and still wrong) spot in the buffer. There’s also only so much filament straightening I can do with my fingers.

The buffer would work if it narrowed on the inlet like it narrows at the outlet. If the buffer narrowed at the inlet, I could grab the filament as it enters the inlet ptfe tube and pass it through the buffer using something else I can control (a stick, a loose ptfe tube, etc). Once I get it to the other side, I can feed it into the outlet pfte tube.

Basically, if the buffer was symmetrical, I think we’d have a winner.

Jeff Gros - Reply

Dear Jeff,

Please rest assured we are thoroughly testing every product before we make it available to our customers. On our test farm, the buffer fulfills its purpose just fine. If you have an idea on how to improve it, feel free to modify the design and let us know how does it work :)

Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

I haven’t found filament loading to be a “nightmare”, but it does take some effort. I seem to have been able to get better at it with a bit of practice. While it is harder than loading filament directly into the extruder, it isn’t going to be an impediment.

One thing that might help is if the laser-cut buffer plates were clear rather than black. That would allow you to see where the filament is headed so you could try twisting it or adjusting your approach.

Dean Reece -

Thanks Dean, your feedback has been noted.

Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

Challenge accepted. Where are the design files for the buffer plates? I could only find the printable pieces that go on the ends when I looked here: https://www.prusa3d.com/downloads/others...

Jeff Gros -

I did my best to measure the existing buffer plate since I couldn’t find design files.

Below is a link with an updated buffer plate that is symmetric in that it has a neck on both ends. With this design you can reach in and grab the filament as you feed it from either end. At that point you could attach it to something (stick, etc) to feed it through the buffer.

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:359287...

I cannot print it because the buffer plate is too big to fit on a Prusa printer (and shapeways wants $75 for their cheapest material per plate, so that’s not feasible either).

To try it myself, I’m going to have to make another design that has each plate cut in 4ths. However, this will require updated pieces to hold these new buffer plates, and probably more of the screws than I have between all of my Mk2/s Mk3/s MMU/2/s kit upgrades.

Not a project I’ll likely get done soon.

Jeff Gros -

Nice job, thanks! We will try to test the design too.

Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

I’ve been experimenting with different ways to make the improved buffer. I first tried chipboard (essentially cardboard), but it was not ideal. It frayed when putting it into the printed parts, and could bow causing filament not to flow freely between the plates.

I ended up using 0.050” 11” x 14” non-glare picture glazing sheets by Plaskolite ($6.68 at my local home depot per sheet). I used the chipboard to make a stencil and then cut the plastic sheets to the correct shape.

Total build costs around $40 from the cost of the sheets, and probably about 20 hours in construction of the final product, although it cost me a bit more time and money from learning/tinkering.

The improved buffer works great! I can now very easily pass filament from one side to the other with the help of a spare 12” ptfe tube. As an added bonus is the buffer is clear so I can see what is going on inside!

I’ll eventually add build instructions to my thingiverse page that has the basic design.

Jeff Gros -

Here is an Instructable that I’ve made to show how to make the buffer: https://www.instructables.com/id/Prusa-M...

I also made a YouTube video showing how easy it is to load: https://youtu.be/EJ182qbVD-w

Jeff Gros -

Jeff - I liked your design on https://www.instructables.com/id/Prusa-M... but I have to ask: Can you just make cutouts in the existing plates to accomplish the same thing?

A. Matulich -

I agree with Jeff. The idea itself is solid, but loading filament is an effing nightmare, not only because of the filament coming out rather randomly, but also because you can only shove it up the 30cm tube a few mm with every shove - and it’s the worst for Filament 5, which you can BARELY reach when the Buffer is attached to the frame. It’s as much a nightmare as using the wrench on the extruder-side festo fitting with the chimney blocking any significant rotation, another design flaw that should be improved…

Daniel K. - Reply

Hi Daniel, thanks the feedback is noted and I will discuss this with the devs. I'm sorry for any inconvenience during the use of the Buffer :/

Jakub Dolezal -

Oh, and how about putting 1-5 numbers near the holes on the s-buffer-printer and s-buffer-spools parts? ;-) And the MMU2S body itself, while you’re at it!.. Would certainly help in determining what’s what and how to hook up things..

Daniel K. - Reply

I need to arrange the printer with the spools on the right side instead. I assume the only adjustment I need to make is to swap which side gets spacers and which side gets spacer-hooks, but everything else (the connections and filament ordering) stays the same?

Dean Reece - Reply

Hi Dean, that should be enough.

Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

Agree with Jeff and Daniel,

The buffer idea is good, but loading filament through it is a frustrating nightmare, which is compounded as more filaments are loaded because it becomes more difficult to maneuver the buffer assembly. Once 5 filaments are loaded things are super until you want to swap one out for whatever reason, again because of the difficulty in moving the buffer while its full. My current solution is to use a fine kniting needle to guide the filament through the buffer. It works but is far from ideal. If someone comes up with an easier solution it'd be great to hear.

Cheers,

Rick - Reply

This buffer is maybe a clever idea but it’s a nightmare to load ! Please give us more informations or more pictures

Pierre - Reply

Hello Pierre!

Would you be able to specify what additional info/images you need? Which part of which step is unclear? We’ll be glad to fix these!

Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

The photos still show the old version of the mmu2-s-holder-endstop part. Maybe at least mention that the new endstop parts look different.

Guido Hoss - Reply

Hello Guido,

Which picture in which step you are referring to exactly?

Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

@mmaczewski Picture 2 in Step 6 (the yellow parts), also visible in the first image at the top of the page. The current endstop holder design is very different, see https://github.com/prusa3d/Original-Prus...

Guido Hoss -

Hello, thanks for the suggestion, updating this is on the list.

Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

Aren’t you missing the key bit where you connect the tubes between the buffer and the MMU2 itself?

C Wigs - Reply

Hello, thanks for notifying us, we will check it.

Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

Hi, this is a part of the Handbook. It is better to test the layout first and then connect the tubes. See the note in the latest step of this chapter.

Jakub Dolezal -

So in NEW version - only 2x hooks are in the package? - How does the NEW version look in picture?

David - Reply

Hello,

Yes, it looks pretty much the same, just no hook in the middle.

Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

Hi David, see the step 14 ;)

Jakub Dolezal -

Hey all,

For those fighting the filament loading, this is working pretty well for me:

Print two square bars 5x5x250mm.

When you’re loading, slide the first bar through from the printer side to the inside of the tube on the spool side. (So push it against the printed part holding the plates, and drag it outward until you hit the bit of the tube sticking out.)

Shove the other bar through so it sticks out on both sides of the plate.

Hold the inner bar so the filament doesn’t push it around (outer doesn’t really matter) and push the filament through.

No matter how stubborn it has curled itself up, it’s got nowhere to go other than where you want it to :)

Mike Welham - Reply

What does this buffer do exactly?  And is it strictly necessary?  I’m having an issue with desk space caused by this buffer.

Karl Reimer - Reply

Hi Karl, it prevents the tangling of the filament. It’s not necessary, but strongly suggested depending on your spools layout.

Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

“Later while reading the handbook?” Really? Can’t it just be here!

james hendrix - Reply

Step 16 says “Make sure the surface with removed protective film is facing towards you. “ I can’t find any reference to removing a film, nor does there appear to be any. Seems like this sentence needs removing.

Paul Turin - Reply

Hi Paul, see step 8, it is described there. While preparing the parts, you are asked to remove them.

Jakub Dolezal -

Just push your filiment through to any side and as it comes out just stir it to the correct side the color or anything else couldn't matter less..

Matt black - Reply

I was truly surprised by this thing (the buffer). No pictures on the site depict the table space required. I now have a challenge of where to shove it my cramped space. I’ll be interested if someone comes up with a better solution. I would hate to have to revert to not using the MMU. The build on this thing was nowhere near the quality of documentation and build of the MK3S itself.

Bill Brothers - Reply

Hello Bill,

The buffer is not absolutely necessary, you can use the vacu-formed spool holders alone, without guiding the filament through the buffer. As for other solutions, you can find many different alternatives for our system on Thingiverse, and if you have an enclosure, you might be interested in this:

https://blog.prusaprinters.org/mmu2s-pri...

Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

I am, most likely, gonna print 5 of these spool holders. (https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:333846... ) You shouldnt need the buffer with these spool holders.

Leonardo Delgado Graça - Reply

+1 on loading nightmare

jeff d - Reply

I can almost live with threading it to the proper hole, but feeding it up to the MMU is just absolutely aggravating to the point where if I have to do this every time, the MMU will be converted back to MK3. This is ridiculous.

jeff d -

Besides that, the buffer works pretty well.

jeff d -

Hello make sure there are no string left by accident in the PTFE tubes or on/in the plastic parts.

Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

I discovered that if I temporarily remove the printer side PTFE tubes from the BUFFER, it makes the loading process much less painful. (Once you have the filament threaded through the buffer) It only takes 2 or 3 turns to loosen the printer side tubing retaining screws and release the tubing. Then you can grab the filament feed it in to the tube and push to your hearts content. Replace the tubing, tighten screws, take up the slack on your spools and you’re on your way. I wall mounted my buffer and feeding the filament from a shelf just above it. It’s working so now I’ll quit complaining :)

jeff d - Reply

The stock s-buffer part that comes with the kit wasn’t a good use of space for me, as I’ve got my mk3 on a shelf. I was able to make something verticle that works as a stand or mount. Just tested my first multi material model and it came out great so it’s confirmed working. MMU2 was a beast to get going, but %#*@ it’s worth it.

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:399911...

Mike - Reply

I have no room anywhere for this buffer in its default configuration. Or even mounted upside-down on an overhanging surface. Maybe if I found a way to mount it vertically standing up on my desk…. but given the comments about the difficulty threading it, I’m going with auto-rewind spool holder dryboxes instead.

A. Matulich - Reply

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