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  1. Needle-nose pliers for zip tie trimming.
    • Needle-nose pliers for zip tie trimming.

    • 2.5mm Allen key for M3 screws

    • 1.5mm Allen key for nut alignment

    • Philips screwdriver to tighten PSU and HB cables

    • WARNING: Make sure to protect the electronics against electrostatic discharge (ESD). Keep the Einsy board in the antistatic bag until it is needed for the assembly.

    The green and blue circles (Allen key sizes) are swapped.

    Ian Morgan - Reply

    Hello Ian, thanks for noticing!

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    This seems to be the only Step where you’re specifying what tools you need and you explicitly identify, with colored circles in the picture, which of the Allen Keys are needed. This ought to be the standard throughout the manual.

    Roger Garrett - Reply

    Hi Roger,

    We do specify the tools throughout the manual, though not always with colored circles.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

  2. For the following steps, please prepare:
    • For the following steps, please prepare:

    • Einsy-door (1x)

    • Einsy-hinge-top (1x)

    • Einsy-hinge-bottom (1x)

    • M3nS nut (1x)

    • M3x10 screw (2x)

    The fasteners are in the ELE box with the ELE. There is no fasteners laying about left over from the PSU & HB portion.

    Allan Albrecht - Reply

    Love you <33

    Wesley Boynton -

    No hardware in the “8. ELE” bag, just printed parts. Unless I missed something, going to the spares bag for the square nut and bolts.

    Wesley Boynton -

    Thanks for the mention!

    Kristian Toole - Reply

    Yep, no hardware. Will need to use spares.

    Randy Andrews - Reply

    Oops, found the hardware. It was inside the anti static bag.

    Randy Andrews - Reply

    Einsy-door hinge top and bottom were already assembled with Einsy-door. No need to hunt for these small pieces.

    Miles Odonnol - Reply

  3. Insert M3nS nut all the way in. You can use the small screw driver to push it down if needed. Check the proper alignment with the Allen key.
    • Insert M3nS nut all the way in. You can use the small screw driver to push it down if needed.

    • Check the proper alignment with the Allen key.

    • If this nut is loose in the slot then it can easily fall out and then possibly short some electrical contacts on the Einsy board whenever you open your Einsy case.

    My nut slot in this door was too big causing the M3nS nut (marked with the green arrow) to repeatedly fall out.

    Had to secure this nut in place with some electrical tape over the slot as this nut is the single fastener nut used later in step 38 with a M3x40 screw to hold the entire Einsy case closed.

    If this nut is loose in the slot then it can easily fall out and then possibly short some electrical contacts on the Einsy board whenever you open your Einsy case.

    Jonathan Lin - Reply

    Hello Jonathan, thank you for your feedback!

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    I had the problem with the nut being loose aswell. So I added a small dot of glue from a hot glue gun to fix the screw in place, which seems to work just fine.

    Johan Pihl - Reply

  4. Turn the rear side of the printer towards you.
    • Turn the rear side of the printer towards you.

    • Holes with blue arrows will be used to mount the hinges for the Einsy-door.

  5. Take the Einsy-hinge-bottom and push M3x10 screw through. Note there is a cutout for the screw's head in the printed part. Locate the hole for the lower hinge.
    • Take the Einsy-hinge-bottom and push M3x10 screw through.

    • Note there is a cutout for the screw's head in the printed part.

    • Locate the hole for the lower hinge.

    • Place the hinge on the frame and tighten the screw. The hinge must be facing upwards.

    To avoid confusion, it may better to say the protruding hinge post must be pointing upwards. The current text is also true if it the post is pointing laterally, away from psu, as the whole hinge is at the top.

    Bob Millen - Reply

    This is an excellent observation.

    thomas king -

  6. Place the Einsy-door on the lower hinge. Take the Einsy-hinge-top and push M3x10 screw through. Assemble the Einsy-hinge-top in the door and mount it to the frame.
    • Place the Einsy-door on the lower hinge.

    • Take the Einsy-hinge-top and push M3x10 screw through.

    • Assemble the Einsy-hinge-top in the door and mount it to the frame.

    Since my screw was very loose in the hinge top, it helped to use the pliers to get the screw into position.

    Laurel W - Reply

    Slight change of sequence: I found it easier to put the screw in the upper hinge, put the hinge in place in the top of the door and then slip the door onto the lower hinge, locating the top screw in the hole as you go.

    Richard Simpson - Reply

    Stop! If you have large hands, install the bottom hinge. Leave the door off until after step 37. Installing the top hinge and door after step 37 makes it much easier to install the wires onto the Einsy board!

    Chad Shumway - Reply

    Agreed… and my hands are just normal sized. There’s no reason for the door to be there yet. It just gets in the way.

    Darrell -

    the small hinge on the bottom piece broke off immediately after placing the door on there. not even applying a lot of force. so be careful.

    Kevin Glaap - Reply

  7. For the following step, please prepare: Textile sleeve 5 x 300 mm (1x) Zip tie (1x)
    • For the following step, please prepare:

    • Textile sleeve 5 x 300 mm (1x)

    • Zip tie (1x)

    • Wrap the sleeve around the X-axis motor cable. The sleeve is shorter, than the motor cable.

    • Secure the sleeve using a zip tie, you have to tighten the zip tie firmly and it is only a temporary fix until the Einsy case is assembled, but you can leave the zip tie in place afterwards.

    These sleeves are not very easy to use.  Can I substitute plastic wire wrap?

    Armando Medina - Reply

    Hi Armando, different sleeve types can damage your cables - it’s best to use the supplied textile sleeve.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    The text says “you have to tighten the zip tie firmly and it is only a temporary fix” but there is no mention of something to make it permanent in any later step, and the sleeve is never attached rigidly to the X motor.

    Richard Herring - Reply

    Hello Richard,

    It means you can remove the zip-tie once the Einsy case is assembled and just leave the textile wrap free as it is preferable not to strain, not to “strangle” the cables.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

  8. For the following steps, please prepare: Einsy-base (1x) M3x10 screw (6x)
    • For the following steps, please prepare:

    • Einsy-base (1x)

    • M3x10 screw (6x)

    • M3nS nut (4x)

    • M3n nut (4x)

    • EINSY RAMBo motherboard (1x)

    • Einsy-base has a maintenance opening for the RPi Zero W. If you intend to use this mini computer, you can carefully cut the piece of the plastic now. More details here: Octoprint for the MK3 (manual.prusa3d.com)

    • Note that the anti-static bag will be opened upon arrival. Each board is taken out and tested before shipping.

    The anti-static bag for the circuit board had already been opened … should that have been the case?

    Roy Steiner - Reply

    Hey Roy,

    Yes, the bag is always open.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    My bag was also opened.

    Tom Ferdinand - Reply

    Hey Tom,

    The bag is always open, there is no need to worry about it.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Should I be using an anti static device while handling the motherboard?

    Leonard Barton - Reply

    Hey Leonard, there is no need to use the bag.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    I get that the bag is opened (I assume for testing) but mentioning that in the manual would save some heart burn. I got a little freaked out when I saw that and thought something was wrong. Especially when the bag of hardware was inside the bag with it. I hope nothing got scratched or dinged on the PCB

    agregorie - Reply

    Hello, I confirm we are always opening the bag for testing. It does seem like a good idea to mention it, I will pass the request upstream.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Definitely mention that the bag was opened for testing. I immediately thought I received a returned/refurbished Einsy unit. Very frustrated till I read the comments here. Since I went to the comments to see what was up, it shows the value of this live comment/discussion board!

    Dave Bear - Reply

    Hello Dave,

    This information will soon be included.

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

    It is easier to insert the M3nS nut into the inner trap, inside the case, prior to installing the electronics board.

    Also, my ELE kit came with only 3 M3nS nuts, not the required 5 for this chapter. I robbed the spares bag.

    Steven Woodbridge - Reply

    The bag being opened (for testing) is now in the instructions. Yay! Roll a 6-sided die and eat that many bears.

    Darrell - Reply

    I knew the bag would be opened and the board tested via the product description when I purchased the printer. It states that every board is tested prior to shipping, also the test results are in the box. f

    Still I would recommend that the bag be taped closed prior to shipping. When I opened the box to inventory the items inside, I found that my board was half way out of the bag. Kinda defeats the purpose of the bag if It slides out and shocks itself into oblivion before it ever arrives. Just a small piece of tape, just enough to hold the opened end together would be enough to protect the board from sliding out.

    Michael Thompson - Reply

    Hi Michael,

    Thank you for the feedback, we’ll look into it.

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

  9. Take the four M3nS nuts you've prepared earlier and insert them in the Einsy case the following way: Two nuts inside the heatbed holder (note one slot is from the inside of the cover) Two nuts inside the extruder cable holder.
    • Take the four M3nS nuts you've prepared earlier and insert them in the Einsy case the following way:

    • Two nuts inside the heatbed holder (note one slot is from the inside of the cover)

    • Two nuts inside the extruder cable holder.

    • Press the nuts all the way in.

    • Check the proper alignment using an Allen key.

    It was more difficult to insert the first nut in this step because the board was already inside the enclosure. Maybe all the nuts could be placed before adding the Einsy step?

    Zack Shivers - Reply

    It’s not necessary to remove the board before inserting them. If they are hard to insert, then you can always use pliers.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    It would definitely be easier to insert the first nut prior to bolting the board in. There doesn’t really seem to be any reason all of the nuts couldn’t be inserted prior to mounting the board.

    William Rigsby - Reply

    Hello William, there is one: we want to prevent the nuts from falling off during the manipulation with this part.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    I agree. Steps 9 and 10 should be reversed. Just because it is possible to insert the nuts after installing the board does mean it’s a good idea. I slipped a few times and dropped the nut on the board, which made me cringe every time.

    Mark Marsula - Reply

    I have to agree. The square nuts are tricky enough to jam in place without having to be cautious of the board too. The hex nuts on the flat face are much looser and can easily fall out but they’re much easy to insert. Swapping steps 10 for 9 protects the board from potential damage.

    runningblue1@hotmail.com - Reply

    +1

    at least inside nut should be inserted first

    Roman Tarakanov - Reply

    I also agree. I actually missed the board insertion in step 9 (totally my bad), but it made the nut insertion a lot easier not having the board there.

    Chris Burr - Reply

    I agree that it’s easier to put the nuts in before the EiNSY board. Some slots had very tight tolerances and it was easier to insert the nuts without the board in place. The risk of the nuts falling out seems minimal to me.

    Miguel Barroso - Reply

    +1 Agree with the guys, it’s better if you first insert the nuts. I had lot’s of hard time trying to do it on this step and not damaging the board

    Valentin Chernaev - Reply

    +1 agree with the rest - you could even add a note to the new step 9 like “if the nuts fall out, you can also insert them in step 10, right after installing the einsy board”

    Sijmen Schoon - Reply

    +1 that it’s much easier to put the nuts in now. I needed to use a file to clean out one of the holes, that’s much easier without having the board in yet.

    Klaus - Reply

    Agreed, nuts first.

    Dave Bear - Reply

    Thanks everyone! I did this step before 9 and that was a huge help. Worked great and just paid attention that the nuts didn't slide out. They were really snug so no real worries about that anyway.

    CYNDI JONES - Reply

    I managed to break an ear off of the Einsy holder putting these nuts in. There is a high probability of this board being damaged by a tool slipping. Support should really consider reversing the steps.

    Anthony Wittler - Reply

    Hello Anthony,

    Thank you for the feedback, we will look into reversing the steps.

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

    Hello! Help from the future (step 33) here. I suggest putting a small bit of blue painters tape over the square nuts after they are inserted. You will be turning the machine sideways and upside down and it is quite likely that the nuts will fall out.

    Steve Gowin - Reply

    The arrows fpr the Pink step in the instructions are Green in the picture

    Bill - Reply

    Hi Bill,

    Thank you for the feedback. We'll fix it.

    Vojta Z. -

  10. Insert four M3n nuts in nut traps. Slide EINSY inside the base and tighten it with four M3x10 screws.
    • Insert four M3n nuts in nut traps.

    • Slide EINSY inside the base and tighten it with four M3x10 screws.

    • Tighten the screws carefully, you can damage the board.

    • Use the needle nose pliers to help with positioning the screws.

    Use a bit of tape to keep the nuts in place while you install the board.

    Jim Miteff - Reply

    Isn’t the Josef Prusa screw pulling technique good to use here?

    Miguel Barroso - Reply

    I tried the pull technique and the nut wouldn’t stay after removing the screw.

    Nick -

    I used it and it worked well enough for me.

    Ian Dunn -

    Guys, before doing this step read the comments for the next one and swap do the next one first. It will save you some troubles and time if you first insert the nuts from the next step

    Valentin Chernaev - Reply

    No need just use pliers works like a charm.

    Morris -

    I agree with Valatin, It was WAY easier doing step 10 first. The square nuts were so tight in there, there was no risk of them falling out.

    Tony Mastrangeli -

    Thank you Valentin!

    CYNDI JONES - Reply

    A couple of these were very loose holes for the nuts, and a couple were very tight. Either way, definitely use the screw-pulling technique first for tight fits, as you do not want to try doing that with the PCB in-between.

    Wesley Boynton - Reply

    In previous steps, the control board is described as a RAMbo. Why is it suddenly being called an EINSY here? The only way I know the the board is the EINSY is because of the picture showing the board sitting in the EINSY case.

    Please update the instruction manual to avoid confusion.

    Lessian - Reply

    Hi Lessian,

    Actually, the MK3 series board is called Einsy RAMBo, as opposed to Mini-RAMBo or RAMBo Mini used in the MK2 series. So RAMBo is a general term. Anyhow, there is only one logic board in the MK3S box so there can be hardy any confusion.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

  11. Holes with blue arrows will be used to mount the Einsy-base. Insert M3x10 screws in the holes and tighten them just slightly. 3-4 turns are enough for now.
    • Holes with blue arrows will be used to mount the Einsy-base.

    • Insert M3x10 screws in the holes and tighten them just slightly. 3-4 turns are enough for now.

    Why tighten them at this point?

    Martin Lundgren - Reply

    Hi Martin,

    It will be easier for you later if you follow the manual.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    “Insert M3x10 screws in the holes and tighten them just slightly. “

    I think this should be “Insert M3x10 screws in the holes and leave the heads about 2.5mm above the frame. In order to mount the Einsy-base on them later”

    David Maher - Reply

    Hey David,

    It’s enough to just “tighten them slightly”, there is no need to measure anything :)

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    I disagree Filip, “tightening” a screw can easily be interpreted as bringing it flush to the surface you are screwing into, before that you just have the constant running torque

    Charlie Miller -

    I was going to ask the same question as Martin and was glad that David provided an answer. To me, the manual suggests tightening the screws slightly, or in other words, screwing them down until they reach the base, but not much further.

    Andy - Reply

    Maybe it should say to start the screw 3-4 turns.

    Darel Beghtel - Reply

    Maybe screw the top one more like 7-8 turns. You’ll have to finish tightening it at an angle through a grate around a PCB in the next step, and it’s much easier to start that if the screw is a little farther into the frame so that it has more clearance from the PCB.

    Wesley Boynton - Reply

  12. Before mounting the base on the frame, take the cable from X-axis motor (see the yellow label) and plug it in the EINSY. Push the textile sleeve in the slot and leave some slack of the cable along the board (don't stretch the cable). See the slots on the printed part, which will be used for the M3x10 screws (those are already on the frame).
    • Before mounting the base on the frame, take the cable from X-axis motor (see the yellow label) and plug it in the EINSY.

    • Push the textile sleeve in the slot and leave some slack of the cable along the board (don't stretch the cable).

    • See the slots on the printed part, which will be used for the M3x10 screws (those are already on the frame).

    Why is my board static shield plastic already opened? Is this normal? It is not sealed anymore,

    Poom - Reply

    They are all opened at the Factory for testing. See responses from Prusa Support in Step 8

    Michael Palmer -

    Hi Poom,

    Reply from Michael above is correct :)

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

  13. Slide the Einsy-base on the prepared M3x10 screws and align it with the edge of the Z-axis frame. Using 2.5mm Allen key tighten both screws. See second and third picture. Using 2.5mm Allen key tighten both screws. See second and third picture.
    • Slide the Einsy-base on the prepared M3x10 screws and align it with the edge of the Z-axis frame.

    • Using 2.5mm Allen key tighten both screws. See second and third picture.

    Random feedback. Has anyone found a way to do the top screw easily? I’m going to have to reassemble the whole thing when i get my pi in so was hoping for advice.

    I found the entire assembly process enjoyable, but this step just seems like it could have been engineered to make assembly easier. I have a ton of tools, and while i was able to use extensions to screw in the bottom screw with a torque wrench, the top one had minimal clearance for anything that i owned. took half a hundred turns of allen key :(

    linrav linrav - Reply

    Thanks for your feedback. Have you tried using some light to better see and reach the screw?

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Well delayed, I know, but the way I did it was to tighten them both quite a bit down. Once they were most of the way in, I slid in the piece and had a lot less distance to tighten it. Also, the allen key they give with the ball point end works well and gets a decent angle that lets you twist without complications I noticed.

    Sean -

    The middle picture shows it. I didn’t notice it for a minute too. It may help to change the color of each arrow and separate out the two into individual steps to make it more obvious.

    Joseph Finan - Reply

    I used a hex screwdriver -not powered, but much easier than a hex key!

    Laurie S - Reply

    Quick tip - the screw at the top wasn’t easily accessible until I applied a slight bit of force on einsy box pulling it toward the screw and heard it “snap” in place on the screw. I then repeated the same process on the bottom screw. Both screws were then easily accessible and could be tightened with the allen key that has the ball end on it.

    Edward McLain - Reply

    Yep - as soon as I turned a light on, the screws practically went in themselves. Are you kidding me??? Allen key with the ball end is the key here. Can even do it in the dark with that one.

    Jeffrey Henn - Reply

    The first picture ought to show it from the other side, showing the slots sliding in over the already-partly-installed screws.

    Roger Garrett - Reply

    Hi there,

    This is specified in the previous step, see the third picture.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

  14. In the following steps, we will manage all the cables on the printer. We've tested several ways and this seems to be the most efficient. In the upcoming steps, please tighten all zip ties carefully as you might pinch/break the cables.
    • In the following steps, we will manage all the cables on the printer. We've tested several ways and this seems to be the most efficient.

    • In the upcoming steps, please tighten all zip ties carefully as you might pinch/break the cables.

    • Turn the printer on the PSU side, then depending on the PSU type:

    • Silver PSU: the cables go above the extrusion

    • Black PSU: the cables go below the extrusion

    • This is the only difference. In all the steps, the cable management is the same for both Black and Silver PSU versions.

    please add a pic for the black PSU

    Tony - Reply

    I recommend you direct people to place the printer on its side. Without a background, there’s no reference for this in the photo, and so people might not know what you recommend for the following steps in terms of how to place the printer. I believe you want it rested on its right side, with its weight agains the Z-axis right printed holder parts.

    Alan Ostroff - Reply

    Hey Alan, it’s mentioned in the description to place the printer on the PSU side.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    The cardboard box that contained the “8. ELE” parts is just the right size to support the long extrusion when resting the printer on the PSU side. Seems safer than putting weight on the printed parts. Picture: https://i.imgur.com/ICAK2kz.jpg

    Klaus - Reply

    I was looking in my empty box pile for just the right box, but figured I’d check the comments first. Right on!

    Sean Tobin -

    Awesome! thanks boss!

    Ed Sinigur -

    Did this right away :) Helps a ton.

    István Nagy -

    the picture for the black psuis so close up that I really have no clue what it is you want me to do with the wires?

    Guess I will read ahead and see where they are ending up and see what I can figure out. Better picture is a must.

    seems like step 15 is telling me to do it different than I should for black but I really don’t know.

    Dean George - Reply

    Hi Dean,

    Make sure to read the description too, it explains what to do with cables.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    I agree with Dean here — the worded description is kind of vague, and the picture is too close up.

    Don’t tell me “do that thing, except just a little different.” Provide two sets of instructions for the two PSUs, even if they’re nearly identical.

    Wesley Boynton -

    The instruction to put the printer on its side seems to apply to both models, but the instruction is only on the Silver PSU bullet. (I have a black PSU and feel like I’m mostly guessing).

    I’m with Dean and Wesley; overall, this instruction is pretty confusing to me, all I really understand is to tighten zip ties carefully.

    Christopher Litsinger - Reply

    Hello Christopher,

    Basically all you are asked to do in this step is to put the printer on its side. The following steps will guide you further. As the silver bullet says, the cables of the delta PSU shall be arranged the same way as the cables of the silver PSU.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    The black PSU photo seems to show the Prusa power cover installed. I had to read ahead to step 26 to make sure I hadn’t missed installing it. Maybe show a photo without the cover to be more clear. Also, by extrusion, the instructions seem to mean below the extruded aluminum rail.

    One last thing - when I put the printer on its side, a M3x10 screw fell out. I panicked, worried I’d have trouble finding where it came from - turns out it was from the PINDA, as I had to loosen it when testing the extruder wire height above the bed.

    Matt Burrough - Reply

    Hi Matt, thanks for the feedback. I will replace the picture, the cover should be installed later on in this chapter.

    Jakub Dolezal -

    As others noted before, the instructions say under “Silver PSU” to turn the printer on the side, so the instruction seems specific to that PSU. I guessed from looking at the picture to do the same for the black PSU.

    Preston L. Bannister - Reply

    Hi Preston,

    Where do you see it saying “Under Silver PSU” exactly? There are already two step variations for each PSU here.

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

    https://imgur.com/a/FfkNZCp This kind of suggests that turning the printer on the side is for silver PSU only.

    Esa Hämölä - Reply

    Hi Esa, the “black PSU” path is exactly the same (so also turn it on the side), save for the initial PSU cables path.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Way too confusing for the black PSU.

    Ben M - Reply

    Hello Ben,

    What did you find confusing here? If something in particular wasn’t exactly clear, please let us know what was it and we will look into adding extra information.

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

    I’m so confused. What cables am I wrapping? and I don’t understand the Black PSU orientation “to the side”?? Which side am I looking at? I see the PSU and I see the z-axis, but where are my cables actually going? Would recommend a similar outer view for the black PSU, it’s just confusing to look at.

    Jane H -

    “In the case of the black PSU the cables are going below the extrusion”

    Is there a particular path desired here?

    I see “cutouts” for for cable paths in other areas - but not here.

    If I were to NOT use the rubber feet - the cables would be pinched under the weight of the machine.

    Chris Bullock - Reply

    Never mind.

    I suppose that the frame’s raised ends push the printer off of its supporting surface, just enough to get the cables out of the way.

    Thanks!

    Chris Bullock -

    Hello, yes, that’s correct. : )

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Like others have pointed out, the text “Turn the printer on the PSU side” should be before the text “Depending on the PSU type: “, as the printer should be turned on the PSU side for both the silver and black PSU. In other words, I suggest that you change the text so that it reads:

    Turn the printer on the PSU side. Start from the bottom all the way to the top.

    Depending on the PSU type:

    Silver PSU: The PSU cables go above the first extrusion.

    Black PSU: The PSU cables go below the first extrusion.

    This is the only difference. In all the steps, the cable management is otherwise the same for both the silver and black PSU versions.

    Björn Andersson - Reply

    +1 good suggestion

    Robstar -

    Agreed, this would be less confusing

    David Miller -

    Good point Björn, I will change this ;) Thanks

    Jakub Dolezal -

    INSTRUCTION

    Turn the printer on the PSU side, then depending on the PSU type:

    SUGGESTION

    To help protect any unnecessary weight while on its side, use the bubble wrap when you lay it on its side.

    Ron - Reply

    If you didn’t already do this in HEATBED & PSU Assembly / STEP 30 (many steps ago), it’s not too late to PREPARE FOR STEP 24

    Before you start to zip tie the cables, mark the cables attached to the power supply

    SUGGESTION

    There are two power cables.

    It’s a good idea to mark the cables to identify cable 1 and cable 2.

    WHY

    Many steps later (ELECTRONICS ASSEMBLY / STEP 24), you will be attaching the other end to the EINSY-base (the think in the static bag) and it’s a good idea to attach using the same configuration to the power supply.

    NOTE - chat said it doesn’t matter. Here’s a copy/paste of their response

    It's not REQUIRED but it would be ideal if you could do so as this could cause troubleshooting future problems much easier and less confusing

    HOW

    1. I used a white sharpie and placed a single dot on both ends of one of the power cable.

    2. Alternatively, you could put a small piece of masking tape on both ends. After you connect to the EINSY-base in later steps, just remove the tape.

    Ron - Reply

    As others were I too was confused by the description between silver vs. black. The I realized what confused me. Keep in mind the printer is sitting on its side. However, the reference to “over extrusion” and “under extrusion” are referring to the orientation of the printer as it sits upright not on its side. Therefore, keeping that in mind the photos make perfect sense and it’s clear the in the fist (left) photo the wires are going above the extrusion and then under the chrome rail. The other photo shows the cables going under the extrusion as the printer sits in the upright position.

    Conclusion: Putting the printer on its side changes the perception of orientation which in turn makes understanding “under” and “over” confusing. (At least in my case.)

    John - Reply

    I also found the black/silver PSU differences confusing. First: “under” vs. ”over”? John’s comment above helps with that. Second: which cables are being referred to here? I read “Black PSU: the cables go below the extrusion.” But which cables? The first bullet point just says “we will manage all cables”. After looking carefully at the pictures I figured out that the cables meant are those from the PSU itself. I would suggest amending the above statement to “Black PSU: the cables from the PSU go below the extrusion.” and similarly for the silver.

    George Bell - Reply

    Hello George,

    Yes, that is correct. The pictures always supplement the text, always look at both.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Did I miss a step where the bottom cover is put on the black PSU, I keep going back but I don’t see it anywhere like it shows in the picture. This entire section should be redone. We got through some very complicated stuff now it seems like they got a different person and they don’t understand how to teach.

    Ronald Smith - Reply

    Hello Ronald, it’s mentioned in the previous chapter that you’ll assemble it here. It’s in step 27.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    You should provide an overview photo and description of where all the wires are going for this cable management section. The two PSU photos aren’t super helpful for the big picture. Are all the moter wires going toward the PSU or the ELE?

    Gregory Raiz - Reply

    Hello Gregory,

    the management of motor cables is shown in the following steps. They should lead towards the ELE, that is where they are plugged in.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Not sure if it was already mentioned but when you put turn the printer on its side, slide the Y Carriage to the back of the printer. This will keep it a bit more stable.

    gabbagabbahey - Reply

    That’s a good trick, Thanks for sharing!

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

  15. Start with the Z-axis motor (right). Slide the zip tie through the circular holes in the frame to create a loop.
    • Start with the Z-axis motor (right).

    • Slide the zip tie through the circular holes in the frame to create a loop.

    • Push the cable gently in the zip tie and tighten it so it is snug and holding the wires. Be careful not to over tighten the tie as it can cut the wires . Cut the remaining part.

    Flush cutters work very well for cutting the zip ties. (I like Xcelite 170M)

    Jeff Keyzer - Reply

    agree Flush cutters or Spru cutters found in you r local toy section or Hobby store with the plastic model kit supplies. nothing better for trimming zip ties. Any brand works.

    Michael Thompson -

    Make sure you are doing the *RIGHT* Z-axis motor, if you overlook that, the photos can leave you scratching your head.

    Kenn Herman - Reply

    Have you ever considered a 3D printed part that would insert into the T-channel of the extrusion and you could loop the zip tie through that? It would hold the wires securely and it would (in my opinion) be easier to route things through them. You would need two, one for each extrusion, and you would have to insert them at the same time you insert the PSU holders (Y assembly).

    Chuck - Reply

    Hi Chuck, that’s a great idea, feel free to model a holder like that and upload it to prusaprinters.org!

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Should this step be skipped for the black PSU? There doesn’t seem to be room to do this.

    Jonathan Taylor - Reply

    Hi, it should be done with both PSU types.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

  16. Continue upwards and using another zip tie create the next loop. Insert  Z-axis cable and all cables from the PSU. Make sure all the cables are below smooth rods and not interfering with the Y-carriage.
    • Continue upwards and using another zip tie create the next loop.

    • Insert Z-axis cable and all cables from the PSU. Make sure all the cables are below smooth rods and not interfering with the Y-carriage.

    • Push the cable gently in the zip tie and tighten it so it is snug and holding the wires. Be careful not to over tighten the tie as it can cut the wires . Cut the remaining part.

    A printed part that could be slid into the aluminum frame during the Y-axis assembly and that had some sort of “eye” in it would allow you to use a zip tie to “draw down” the PSU cables to ensure they didn’t foul the Y-carriage. The part could be in the frame 90 degrees offset from the feet to ensure it didn’t pull the cables too far or interfere with how the frame stood on a surface.

    Scott Mutton - Reply

    I have to agree with that anything that can prevent problems along the way is great.

    Shane Hobson -

    Hey Scott,

    Our new PSU design will prevent that from happening.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    I think Scott’s point and my own is a lot of us who ordered the MK3s are getting the silver PSU, as Prusa is probably exhausting that supply before send out the new black PSUs. So a potential solution for those with the silver PSU would be most welcome.

    Chris Burr - Reply

    Don’t forget those power cables go UNDER the extrusion with the BLACK Power Supply . X-D

    Justin Valois - Reply

    is it possible the photos are of just the silver PSU? As far as I can tell for the black PSU that I have, you can’t get the PSU cable in between the extrusion and the PSU, they have to go under the extrusion. In any case, they can go under the silver rod as directed in the text. It’s just that the photos are confusing to me.

    Alan Ostroff - Reply

    Hey Alan, please double check Step 14 (8. Electronics assembly), it explains the cable management difference.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Cable management (like for the initial right motor) should probably be done before all these weight-adding steps. The printer gets heavy!

    Jeffrey Foley - Reply

    I agree with Scott concerning cable management below the black anodized aluminum. If the cable get bundled, as they do in a zip tie, it makes a bundle about 15mm in diameter. The little gray foot is bout 10 mm high. Not good. The wires need to be held individually in something like this (__)_(__)_(__)_(__)_(__) fastened to the bottom of the extrusion. Sorry for the poor graphics

    Gene Barker - Reply

    I started the zip tie on the opposite side of this picture. That results in the nub being on the opposite side and the wire side just having a clean loop holding it in place.

    Daniel Friesen - Reply

    Me too. Seems better.

    Miles Odonnol -

    This is a genius tip - way more better!

    Jeffrey Henn -

    “and all cables from the PSU” (I have the black one). The photos don’t show this, so it’s confusing. I’m going to obey the text and ignore the photos even though this goes against human nature. I can only assume the photos are for the silver PSU.

    Darrell - Reply

    Step 16 is confusing because I have no solid black section. Has something been put over the black PSU? I have a black PSU but it still shows the connections and this photo does not show where the cables are coming from. Are they being looped around something? I think there is a in between step that’s missing.

    Sarah - Reply

    Hello Sarah,

    The cables from teh PSU are led in between the PSU and the aluminium extrusion. They are definitely not looped anywhere :)

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Hi, should the black and white twisted cable also go along with the two pairs of Red and Black power cables? Also, in the second photo here in this current step, the cable from the Z-axis right motor are just bundled with the two pairs of power cables from the PSU behind the bottom of the YZ-vertical frame. However, in picture 2 in Step 4, the motor cable are embedded inside and along the long extruder frame along the y-axis. Which is correct? I have a black PSU.

    pcprusa - Reply

    Hello,

    All cables are bundled together in a single bundle along aluminum extrusion.

    Martini H. - Official Prusa CS -

    The photos must be for the silver PSU because I have black and the cables are red/black x 2 and black/white. I can understand using only one photo that essentially applies to both type PSUs but simply adding one additional photo of the application for the black PSU would be easy and make assembling the printer an easier and more enjoyable experience.

    John - Reply

    This MUST be the Silver PSU that the images relate to. There is NO PATH for the cables from the black PSU to go anywhere, but UNDER the frame rails. You should provide images or BOTH, or at least give an explicit warning of what must be done. I worried I’d done something wrong, & would have to take the frame apart!

    Christine - Reply

    Hello Christine, it’s explicitly mentioned in Step 14 that the cables should go below the extrusion with the black PSU. We’ll consider adding another warning here, though.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    It’s not that you need another warning, it’s that you need another PHOTO. One showing the cable routing for the silver PSU, one for the cable routing of the black PSU.

    Roger Garrett -

    Also, the power cables that you show in the photo that are coming from the PSU are shown as ALL BLACK. The ACTUAL power cables are BLACK and RED. It’s just another source of easy confusion.

    Roger Garrett - Reply

  17. Continue upwards and using another zip tie create the next loop. Insert Y-axis motor cable to the current bundle.
    • Continue upwards and using another zip tie create the next loop.

    • Insert Y-axis motor cable to the current bundle.

    • Push the cable gently in the zip tie and tighten it so it is snug and holding the wires. Be careful not to over tighten the tie as it can cut the wires . Cut the remaining part.

    Cable count should be 4.

    Allan Albrecht - Reply

    Are you sure? I think it should be 5

    Dominik -

    Should be 5.

    Andras Feher - Reply

    Yes - Z axis, 3 from PSU (2 red & black, and twisted skinny white/black) and now Y axis.

    Laurel W - Reply

    Thank you! I forgot about the white/black cable a few steps back, and you just saved me a lot of trouble.

    Sindre Skorpen -

    And yes it’s good to note that the two power cables east consist of one RED wire and one BLACK wire. The PHOTO shows them all to be black. Just another opportunity for confusion.

    Roger Garrett -

    Is it only me or the Y-axis motor would be better [less stress] if cable was oriented towards the front of the printer?

    A 2 E - Reply

    Hi, the cable won’t be stressed regardless of which route you’d choose.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Some photos not so close up would be really appreciated

    Ronald Smith - Reply

    I would recommend saying “ADD the Y-axis motor cable to the CURRENT bundle. “

    Roger Garrett - Reply

    That does seem like a better wording, we will consider it.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

  18. Take the LCD cables and gently push them in the aluminum extrusion. Leave some slack, do not stretch the cables too much. Use the whole length of the extrusion. Bend the cable bundle down for now.
    • Take the LCD cables and gently push them in the aluminum extrusion. Leave some slack, do not stretch the cables too much.

    • Use the whole length of the extrusion.

    • Bend the cable bundle down for now.

    • Carefully fold the LCD cables around the frame.

    I added a cable tie at the front and the rear of the aluminum extrusion to help prevent the ribbon cables from falling out.

    Allan Albrecht - Reply

    Disregard that. There is a chance that if too loose, they could interfere with the movement of the heatbed. The bearings underneath may catch on the cable tie.

    Allan Albrecht - Reply

    Hey Allan, yes, that’s correct. No cable ties on the extrusions!

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Be careful to shove the LCD cables into the SIDE of the extrusion (inside) rather than the BOTTOM of the machine (facing you if the machine is tilted onto the PSU side as suggested).

    The fat ribbon cables are a pain in the ass to remove from the extrusion, at least without a worrisome amount of flexing.

    Wesley Boynton - Reply

    Thanks for the heads up, I almost did that!

    Tony Mastrangeli -

    I made this mistake. Running an allen key along the extrusions behind the LCD cables popped them out without flexing however.

    James -

    I wonder if anyone’s printed a flexible insert for the side extrusions to hold the lcd cables in place? Something similar to the feet would do the trick.

    linrav linrav - Reply

    If I lay the two flat cables directly on top of each other, I can fold a shallow “V” into them without straining the wires. The “V” is inserted along the length of the inside edge of the extrusion (the edge pointed downwards if the machine is laying on its side). At the end of the extrusion closest to where they emerge to join the other cables, the flat cables come cleanly out of the channel to hang down. Then, gently fold the cables up and left . This creates an angled portion of cable - do not pinch it too hard, but it then fits right thru the small tunnel in the bottom of the “Prusa” plate.

    When you join with the other wires, put the flat cables furthest away from you in the zip tie. Put the other cables in the zip tie so they are closer to you, then tighten. This holds the flat cables gently in the tunnel, and extrusion. Finally, I put a zip tie around one of the orange LCD legs and the two flat cables right before they go into the extrusion. This avoids conflict with Y axis movement.

    John Drabik - Reply

    That’s what I did. Inserting the ribbon cables as a “V” shape lets them unfold inside the extrusion and lock themselves inside. No need for anything to hold them there.

    Darrell -

    I (and another fellow) designed a ribbon cable holder. I hated trying to stuff the cables in the T-slot of the extrusion. I recommend just zip tying until assembled and printing the holder. Much better! They should include these in the kit IMO. https://www.prusaprinters.org/prints/308...

    Chad Shumway - Reply

    Stuffing the flat ribbon cables into the aluminum extrusion is by far the least desirable part of instructions. Thanks chad @oregonerd you have an excellent solution! I agree they should be included in kit. :) As for the rest of the wires, I did not like leaving them loose to flop around, even with the zip ties. Some additional cable management fabric tube would have been nice here. I used this cable protector that I had on hand: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07FR7... Being somewhat rigid plastic, the resultant height it is about the same height as the feet, so try to keep the cables flat and inline where they pass under the extrusion. The fabric tube would have been perfect.

    gojimmypi - Reply

    I used the rounded end of a sharpie to set the cables inside the rails (for now). I’m not thrilled with the arrangement - might be printing those clips!

    Laurie S - Reply

  19. Continue upwards and using another zip tie create the next loop. Take the bundle of cables and place it over the LCD cables.
    • Continue upwards and using another zip tie create the next loop.

    • Take the bundle of cables and place it over the LCD cables.

    • Push the cables gently in the zip tie (excluding the LCD cables) and tighten it. Cut the remaining part.

    It might be worth explicitly pointing out the “fold” that is performed on the ribbon cables just before they pass over the notch in the frame. If someone isn’t paying close attention to the red edge of the cable the fold is easy to miss.

    Scott Mutton - Reply

    Watch your hands on the y axis zip ties cut in an earlier chapter. That will slice your hand like butter and will leave blood on your almost finished printer.

    Jeffrey Foley - Reply

    For this reason it is best to cut the zip ties as close to and flush with the head of the zip tie as possible!

    Heimdall -

    This is why you never want to use a pair of needle nose pliers to cut zip ties A good pair of flush cutters is something all people with 3D printers need. If you don’t have a pair get them now and use them to cut the ties flush up against the head so no sharp edges are left when cut . Hey, PRUSA are you listening how about a pair of flush cutters instead of the Phillips screwdriver, wev’e all got a screwdriver already.

    Lee Kibbler -

    Some seriously genius cable management having the bundle and the next zip tie hold the ribbon cables in the frame notch!

    Spenser Holen - Reply

    NEED to mention that the ribbon cables are flipped, if not folded, before they are ran through the frame v slot. If not for the 1st comment stating this, I would have missed it all together until it became an issue and I had to back track to correct the problem. Otherwise the flow of cable management is rather nice.

    Michael Thompson - Reply

    Hi Michael.

    Thank you for your feedback. We’ll look at this, and if necessary, mention it in this step. :)

    Vojta Z. -

    Wait. What? DOES it matter which side the red stripe is on? Is there really a flip of the cable at this, or some, point?

    Roger Garrett -

  20. Slide the zip tie through the circular holes in the frame to create a loop. This time place the LCD cables carefully in the zip tie. Insert the Z-axis left motor cable and all cables from the bundle.
    • Slide the zip tie through the circular holes in the frame to create a loop.

    • This time place the LCD cables carefully in the zip tie.

    • Insert the Z-axis left motor cable and all cables from the bundle.

    • Don't tighten the zip tie! Wait for the next step.

    Another fold of the ribbon cables. I’m guessing that this is the standard procedure when a ribbon cable changes direction and that most people “just know” this. Have pity on people like me, though :-).

    Scott Mutton - Reply

    Please move the “do not tighten the zip tie yet” warning from the next step here - it’s too easy to miss since the section looks self contained and similar to the previous ones.

    Klaus - Reply

    Hey Klaus, thanks for the feedback. We’ll add the warning.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    It doesn’t really matter as the next step is just tighten the zip tie just don’t $!^& it up. 20 and 21 could be combined.

    Mathew Boon -

    Hello, and welcome to another episode of “How To Unf*$k Yourself!” Today, we talk about how to re-orient the cable direction of your Z-axis motors!

    If, like me, you’re a dunce who is incapable of following the simplest instructions in any capacity, you may have mounted one (or both!) of your Z-axis motors so that the cables are facing out the wrong direction. Never fear! This, too, is fixable. Even a lovable idiot like yourself deserves to finish your build.

    1. Turn the printer upright (if you had it on its side during the previous cable management steps)

    2. Begin unscrewing the bolts which fasten the Z-axis motors to their holders. Do this in a diagonal pattern across the two motors (top left motor A, bottom right motor B, bottom right motor A, top-left motor B, etc.)

    Wesley Boynton - Reply

    3. When you arrive at the last pair of screws (one left in each motor assembly), removing them will cause the whole Z-axis assembly to plop down. Apply some gentle support to the Y-axis beams and lower the whole assembly to the bench, being careful never to apply pressure or support too much weight that way as it could potentially bend the beams.

    4. With the Z-axis motors resting comfortably on the bench, rotate them appropriately according to the cable management pictures and your particular f*%kup.

    5. Again, with caution, use the Y-axis beams to lift the whole assembly back up so that the motors are again flush with the motor holders, and begin screwing them back in with roughly the same screw order as before (get one diagonally-placed screw in each motor before releasing the Y-axis beams

    6. Finish replacing all of the screws and enjoy being un-f*$ked :)

    Wesley Boynton -

    Its nice to know Im not the only one… ;)

    Renato Vaimberg -

    Going by the pictures, it looks to me that (unlike the other cables so far) the Z axis left cable passes through the loop TWICE. Once at front, and once at the back with the other cables. If correct, probably worth mentioning in the text.

    Bob Millen - Reply

    Hi Bob, you’re correct.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Thanks Bob, I totally missed that.

    Steven Smith - Reply

  21. Push the cables gently in the zip tie, before you tighten the zip tie, read the next point.
    • Push the cables gently in the zip tie, before you tighten the zip tie, read the next point.

    • This time be very careful! Tighten the zip tie slightly or you will damage the LCD cables! The zip tie should be snug to hold the wires in place. Over tightening it can cut the wires!

    • That's it! Cables are organised, let's connect them to the EINSY board. Now you can turn the printer back on its feet.

    If step 20 and 21 were combined I think more people would be careful of the ribbon cables.

    Miguel Barroso - Reply

    You say in this step that “you can turn the printer back on its feet.” This assumes that people put it no its side, rather than an alternate like mounted it on a frame that they could work underneath, like a car mechanic.

    Alan Ostroff - Reply

    this sounds like one of those I can’t think of a real complaint so I’ll complain about nothing posts.

    they tell you to turn it on its side so if someone used another method they can figure out what

    orientation is next by the directions above.

    Dean George -

    i’m just wondering if they use the same pliers @prusa to cut all those zip ties.

    NightmareOn - Reply

    I cant imagine. Everyone reading, do yourself a favor and get some real diagonal cutters for electronics and cut all these ties flush!

    David Krauss -

    I’ve found nail clippers work awesome for clipping zip ties flush and not sharp.

    Fred -

    I’m sure they don’t :o)

    It would be very tedious to build with just the included tools imo.

    Curtis -

    No matter now many times I checked to make sure I had all the cables before pulled the zip ties closed I still manage to leave one cable out and this is were Flush Cutting Side Wire Cutter came in handy.

    Ronald Lake - Reply

  22. For the following steps, please prepare:
    • For the following steps, please prepare:

    • Extruder-cable-clip (1x)

    • Heatbed-cable-clip (1x)

    • M3x10 screw (4x)

    • Note the difference between both clips.

    Missing Extruder-cable-clip, now I can’t finish this section and eat my Haribos :`(

    Guessing it’s not the most important part and I can print it once printer is up and running

    Roman Tarakanov - Reply

    Hey Roman, the easiest and fastest way would be to print the part yourself - it can be done from any material. You will pass the calibration without it :)

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    I actually found mine.

    It was stuck to the Einsey-door. It looked like it belonged there so I didn’t even think to check if it comes out :) … blended so perfectly

    I did get printer setup, calibrated and tested without it though. All I needed was a zip-tie to hold the cable bundle in place

    Roman Tarakanov - Reply

    Same here - Thank you Roman. Mine was stuck to the top of the Einsey-door, looked like it was part of it. Glad you commented on finding it there!

    gabbagabbahey -

    Is the Heatbed-cable-clip part missing from the MK2S to MK3S list of parts to upgrade and print? I chose to download the STL package to print the parts individually, and I don’t see a Heatbed-cable-clip. There is a Heatbed-cable-cover and Heatbed-cable-cover-clip, however.

    Perry Liu - Reply

    Hi Perry.

    I am very sorry. I probably overlooked this part. Now it should be correct. Thank you for your feedback.

    Vojta Z. -

    I was also missing this piece on the MK2s to MK3s conversion. Confirmed that it is now fixed. Thank you!

    Mike Wojtas -

  23. Insert the heatbed cable bundle including the textile sleeve in the Einsy-base. Make sure the sleeve is inside the holder, see the picture.
    • Insert the heatbed cable bundle including the textile sleeve in the Einsy-base.

    • Make sure the sleeve is inside the holder, see the picture.

    • Use the Heatbed-cable-clip and two M3x10 screws to fix the cable bundle in place. Note the correct orientation of the clip, try closing the door.

    The hotbed cable bundle goes together correctly but the heat bed-cable-clip, even though seated properly, won’t allow the case door to close correctly. There’s no gap between the clip and the case but the alignment just isn’t correct. It doesn’t appear either piece is warped, etc.

    Deanb - Reply

    Strike that last comment. Oops. Improper part orientation!

    Deanb - Reply

    But thank you for mentioning that. I made the same orientation mistake.

    When it’s easily possible to put something in in the wrong orientation (it fits in both ways) it would be nice for there to be two pictures, one showing the right orientation, one showing the wrong. Sometimes that’s done in this manual, other times, not.

    Roger Garrett -

    I found it easier to perform this step after Step 24, the wires are a little too short to make the connections to the EINSY board when the cable is attached. If I did step 24 first and then step 23, there was no problem with lengths.

    Blair Krotenko - Reply

    I followed your advice, and it was simple. It also made sense to me because the heatbed wires are all the way to the right, so it was easier working left to right.

    Michael Pennachio -

    +1. Good suggestion.

    Robstar -

    @Blair. I agree, thanks for the advice.

    Hans G. Schnieder - Reply

    I suggest Blair’s advice

    Heimdall - Reply

    The heat-bed-cable-clip fits either way up so if the door won’t close just remove the cable clip turn it through 180 degrees and refit.

    Phil Pearce - Reply

    How big should the “heatbed cable bundle including the textile sleeve” loop be? For example, what is the distance in mm from the opening of the Heatbed-cable-clip to the nearnest end of the textile sleeve?

    pcprusa - Reply

    No worries, you don’t need to measure it in milimeters. Just mimic what you see on the photos.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Is it normal that Einmsy base and the door do not fit perfectly?

    pcprusa - Reply

    Hello, it is not. The door should fit and should be tightened by the M3x40 screw.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

  24. IMPORTANT: it is CRUCIAL to connect the PSU and HB cables in correct order to the EINSY board. POSITIVE WIRE must be connected to POSITIVE SLOT. There are TWO VERSIONS of the cables with different coloring system: Version A: both wires on each pair are black, POSITIVE WIRE is  marked with a RED LINE
    • IMPORTANT: it is CRUCIAL to connect the PSU and HB cables in correct order to the EINSY board. POSITIVE WIRE must be connected to POSITIVE SLOT. There are TWO VERSIONS of the cables with different coloring system:

    • Version A: both wires on each pair are black, POSITIVE WIRE is marked with a RED LINE

    • Version B: on each pair, there is a red and black wire. POSITIVE WIRE is FULLY RED.

    • Connect wires from PSU and HEATBED to the EINSY board in the following order (red arrows indicate positive slot):

    • The first cable from the PSU (A+|A-).

    • The second cable from the PSU (B+|B-).

    • Cable from the heatbed (C+|C-).

    • Both cables (two pairs) from the PSU are the same, their order doesn't matter, just ensure correct polarity.

    The screwdriver included in the kit is too small for the terminal screws. A slightly larger screwdriver works MUCH better.

    Ken biles - Reply

    So, to clarify, as long as the positive and negative wires are in the right order, it doesn’t matter which PSU cable comes first or second, right? In other words, A+ and B+ are interchangeable and A- and B- are interchangeable, as long as A+ and A- are not mixed up. Can someone confirm or give more clarification? Thanks!

    Matt - Reply

    Hi Matt, you are correct.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    I would clarify Matt’s comment further to say that it is the A+/A- PAIR and the B+/B- PAIR are interchangeable, but don’t interchange the positive or negative wires either within or across the pairs. Technically it may work fine if you had A+/B- together and B+/A- together, but don’t take that risk, because it will depend on how the power supply is built.

    Ian Morgan - Reply

    There is a third set of wire type:

    My wires are paired in fully red with a black line and fully black with a red line. I am assuming the fully red with the black line is the positive one. We’ll know soon…

    Mikael Trolle Borup - Reply

    Did it explode or not Im confuesd at this stage too.

    Shane Hobson -

    I’m lost with the polarities, my wires don’t seem to conform to type a or b, things like this need to be foolproof as wiring wrong breaks things and the warranty doesn’t cover it.

    Shane Hobson -

    Hey Shane, please contact live chat - we will help you if you’re not sure about the wire color.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Same here. I have two PS cables supplied in my kit. Both cables have one lead with a black wire and red stripe, and the other lead a red wire with a black stripe.

    I will seek out the chat.

    Red flag. Hazard alert. This step wants improvement. Utter clarity is wanted where electric power wiring is concerned. Miscommunication might cause fatal shock, fire, and/or damage the equipment.

    I’d guess this is version B (were I inclined to guess about electrical wiring.)

    “Version B: on each pair, there is a red and black wire. POSITIVE WIRE is FULLY RED. “

    Except the positive wire is “fully red” with a black stripe, and the other is a black wire with a faint red stripe.

    Don’t guess when it comes to electric power.

    HappyHermit3D -

    I found it easier to connect cables by first loosening the top screw from Step 13 that attaches the Einsy base to the frame, and then rotating the Einsy about 45 degrees. Then you also can read the labels “+ PWR IN -” “+ BED IN -” and “+ BED OUT -”. Just make sure the X-axis cable doesn’t pop out of its channel before you swing the Einsy back.

    Dan Green - Reply

    Side note: The plastic sheaths on the connectors where each wire attaches to its U-shaped terminal are all red coloured. How hard would it be to use black sheaths for the black wires?

    Scott Mutton - Reply

    Send a picture to the live chat mate I just did this and all was sorted.

    Shane Hobson -

    The red color of the sheath (actually fork terminals) indicates wire gauge, not polarity. If the wire was a different size, it would be blue or yellow. Prusa didn’t color the fork terminals, it is universal.

    thomas king -

    A SOLUTION TO THE RED/BLACK, POSITIVE/NEGATIVE ISSUE

    What would be GREAT would be if, when these cables are being prepared at the factory for inclusion in the kit, stickers would be wrapped around each wire end identifying the POSITIVE and NEGATIVE wires, maybe simply covering the stickers with appropriate + and - signs. There are a number of OTHER cables in the kit where there’s a sticker attached to an end with a code number and/or the NAME of the cable. Surely something like that could be done with THESE cables.

    Roger Garrett -

    Mine even more confusing, confirmed correct by support.

    Terminal A+ red wire with black stripe

    Terminal A- Fully black

    Terminal B+ red wire with black stripe

    Terminal B- Fully black

    Terminal C+ red wire with black stripe

    Terminal C- black wire with a red stripe

    Norman Farmer - Reply

    Same here. Thankfully the old red is positive, black is negative can usually be followed. So red with black stripe is still “red” and black with red stripe is still “black.”

    Combine the fact that the IEC, DIN, and the United States all have different standards, it’s a miracle we don’t blow ourselves up :P

    Michael Pennachio -

    This just proves even genius can screw up, using the same two colours for positive and negative is CRAZY, far too easy to mix up, use one solid colour for positive wire, and a second different colour for negative, simple!

    Combine that with using “A” and “B” for both

    i) ‘wire version’,

    ii) labelling of terminals and

    iii) differentiation between PSU wires, and you have perfect recipe for confusion and disaster, Try using:

    “1-2-3” etc for wire versions

    “A-B-C” for labelling different wires (from PSU etc)

    and positive and Negative for terminals.

    I am now paranoid, esp as my warranty could be void and Czech is a Loooooonnggggg drive…..

    and someone has nicked my gummis….

    Jonathan Tall - Reply

    Hi Jonathan,

    The positive wire should be either fully red or makred with a red stripe. Please contact our tech support if it doesn’t have any marking.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    I suspect all the color confusion here is because when you split the wires apart, the coloring on the casing doesn’t split cleanly so you are seeing a red stripe on the black wire and a black stripe on the red wire. If you inspect your wire farther down where the 2 are still connected, you’ll see that 1 is fully red and 1 is fully black.

    Tim Gradl - Reply

    That would explain it, maybe. Thanks Tim.

    HappyHermit3D -

    Yes, that’s it. Where the red and black wires touch is where they split, so tiny bits of the color can mingle there.

    thomas king -

    Suppose someone (like me- it was late) switched the ends o the cables when they were attached to the PSU- red connectors on the PSU and blue connectors on the EINSY board- are the terminal connectors the same size on each end?

    Penjim - Reply

    Hi Penjim, the PSU side connectors are slightly bigger.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

  25. PROPER ORIENTATION of the POWER CABLE is IMPORTANT!!! CORRECT: Bent part of the connector is facing up. Push it below the square washer, all the way in.
    • PROPER ORIENTATION of the POWER CABLE is IMPORTANT!!!

    • CORRECT: Bent part of the connector is facing up. Push it below the square washer, all the way in.

    • INCORRECT: Bent part of the connector is facing down. This will cause issues and might end up damaging the board!

    When your cable harness builder makes a 24v pair make sure the red is on the left and the black is on the right and make sure the bent part of crimp connector is pointing up, and maybe an additional centimeter or 2 in length would help. My one pair from pwr supply to MB with reversed connectors was almost too short. Had to force/stretch to reach terminal strip.

    John McGraw - Reply

    This step would be much more helpful in the previous section on the PSU when first interacting with these connections.

    Tom Williams - Reply

    Hello Tom, yes, it would be easier, but it would also be easier to damage the board when it was not protected by its casing.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    So, you put this step in telling us how to connect to the terminals after we’ve already connected the wires in the previous step?

    Ronald Smith - Reply

    Hi Ronald.

    Thank you for your feedback. The previous step shows the overall wiring of all PSU cables. The following steps describe how to connect particular cables. We will consider adding a sentence referring to these steps.

    Vojta Z. -

  26. Please make sure you have connected  POSITIVE and NEGATIVE polarity as described in the previous step! Always place the wire with POSITIVE polarity in the positive  slot on EINSY. See the pictures for red arrows. Make sure the bent part of the cable connector is always facing up (away from the board)!!! Similar setup was used during the Black PSU assembly. Check once more following setup:
    • Please make sure you have connected POSITIVE and NEGATIVE polarity as described in the previous step! Always place the wire with POSITIVE polarity in the positive slot on EINSY. See the pictures for red arrows.

    • Make sure the bent part of the cable connector is always facing up (away from the board)!!! Similar setup was used during the Black PSU assembly.

    • Check once more following setup:

    • Take the first cable from the PSU and connect the pair of wires to the EINSY board. Use the bundled Philips screwdriver. TIGHTEN the screw firmly!

    • Take the second cable from the PSU and connect the pair of wires to the EINSY board.

    • The last pair of wires is from the heatbed. Connect them to the last two slots.

    • Please note that not following these steps correctly could possibly void the warranty on the printer if any damage occurs. Please take your time and double check the correct connections and tighten the screws.

    For those of you completely new to this like I am: You don’t have to take the screw out. Just slide the connector beneath the head of the screw and tighten.

    Matt - Reply

    Suggestion to the assembly manual devs: it would be easier to connect all cables with the ensy box on the table. Then mount it to afterwards. Tightening screws hard while giving counterpressure from behind to prevent the mounting bracket from braking wasnt optimal

    Svein Skaara - Reply

    Hello Svein, your suggestion has been noted and sent upsteam. Thank you!

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    I think the note should say “incorrectly” right?

    Please note that not following these steps correctly could possibly void the warranty on the printer if any damage occurs. Please take your time and double check the correct connections and tighten the screws.

    Blake - Reply

    Hi Blake,

    It does say not before it :)

    Please note that not following these steps correctly could possibly void the warranty on the printer if any damage occurs.

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

    Personally I tripped over this wording as well, had to read it a few times. Goes to show how important the gift of clear writing is. (In general, I have found these manuals excellent, though.)

    Mat Smith -

    I had to take the door off, was a lot easier!

    Antal Botond - Reply

    Yup. I’m positive I got the red wire on the correct terminal!

    Alan Pieroway - Reply

    Suggestion to Prusa: Please, please, please, just include monochrome cables. The idea of a warranty-voiding procedure wherein I have to tell the difference between a red wire with a black stripe and a black wire with a red stripe is mind-boggling. This is ridiculous. Use a red wire and a black wire, no extra coloring. Or purple and magenta, I don’t care. Two different colors and no overlap between them visually.

    Wesley Boynton - Reply

    I’m making a build of the new MK3s, it has the black PSU: I really recommend adding 2 centimeters of cable because it was hard to route and is tight as a guitar string.

    A 2 E - Reply

    The Philips screwdriver is not the best for these screws. I could hardly rotate the screws with it, it grinds them. I used a flat head instead.

    Mezei Mihály - Reply

    I found that the supplied Phillips screwdriver is too small and does indeed “grind” the screw heads. Using the correct size Phillips screwdriver from my toolkit worked perfectly

    David Edley - Reply

    Provided screwdriver is not correct for terminal strip screws, a #2 phillips is the correct tip for driver.

    John McGraw - Reply

    10 points for that comment :P

    Mat Smith -

    “Ground is the wire with the least amount of red”. Really? :/ Different wires with solid color only, or better: color coded crimp connectors on the end would be a definite improvement. Even labels like on the X-Axis wires would be great, as well.

    gojimmypi - Reply

    I agree 2 SOLID color wires !! One RED ONE Black OR one WHITE and ONE BLACK for the Color Blind People !

    jeffk@northville.com - Reply

    The whole point is that there’s one version that DOES have a black wire and a red wire. The other version isn’t exactly difficult to understand. If there’s a red stripe, then it’s positive. That’s all.

    Mat Smith -

    Note 1: after routing all the cables and tightening the all the zipties, I couldn’t connect the PSU wires because they were too short. Apparently I had taken a little detour closer to the frame by the first Z axis motor and that was enough to eat up the slack. (black PSU)

    Note 2: I found it easier to put the printer back on its side to connect the PSU & HB cables; super easy access and good view this way.

    Vincent Mallet - Reply

    A couple of things-

    1. I used a Slotted/ Flat Head screwdriver (a 40 year old Craftsman 3/16”) instead of a Philips head on the terminal screws; it worked fine on the screws I got.

    2. The wires I have are nominally red and black, but so much of the black comes off when the wires are separated it’s hard o tell the wires apart from some angles. Perhaps a QC issue with the wire provider.

    Penjim - Reply

    The U shaped connectors on the ends of my wires were slightly too wide to side into the slots on the board where they are to be connected. I had to pinch them slightly with the pliers to get them to slide in under the screws.

    skysport@wvi.com - Reply

    >>> The idea of a warranty-voiding procedure wherein I have to tell the difference between a red wire with a black stripe and a black wire with a red stripe is mind-boggling

    Nowhere does it say there’s a red wire with a black stripe and a black wire with a red stripe. That would indeed be difficult. Instead, it says there are two versions, one version has “monochrome” colours, and the other has positive denoted by a red stripe. Whichever version you have, it’s really easy to identify which one is positive. If it has red on it, it’s positive. If you’ve got this far in the manual then I’m pretty sure understanding this should prove absolutely no problem.

    Mat Smith - Reply

    Hello, yes, you’re correct. If it has red on it, it’s positive.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

  27. For the following step please prepare:
    • For the following step please prepare:

    • PSU-cover-Delta (1x)

    • M3x10 screw (2x)

    This was already done in chapter 7. Heatbed and PSU assembly, step 24.

    Esa Hämölä - Reply

    Hi, it was moved here in order to ensure the PSU cables are connected correctly on both sides.

    Jakub Dolezal -

    Is there an STL or Gcode file available for this so I can print it myself as I didn’t get one in the MK2 to MK3S upgrade - I downloaded the STL and Gcode files from the Prusa website but I can’t see one for this particular part - Which file is it in?

    Paul Green - Reply

    Hello Paul, it should be here: https://www.prusa3d.com/prusa-i3-printab... in the MK3S zip file. If it’s not there, it will be added soon.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Thanks Martin, I just re-downloaded that zip and it contains files from February. I can’t find any for the PSU cover. I thought it might be PSU-cover-MK3.STL but that doesn’t look anything like the one in the picture above. I will wait for you to update the zip.

    Paul Green -

    In case anyone else is looking for this. Prusa have now added it to the Zip. The file you need is called psu-cover-DELTA.stl

    Paul Green -

    Hi, the bundle of STLs includes the PSU cover, there was some software glitch, but it is fixed now. Sorry for the delay ;)

    Jakub Dolezal -

    This is black PSU instructions?

    jeff d - Reply

    Hello Jeff,

    That’s correct, the printer cover is for Black (Delta) PSU only, if you have the silver one, you can omit this step.

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

    M3x10 screws don’t reach far enough to attach. I had to use 12 mm screws instead. The 10 mm screws were both flush w the end of the screw holes on the cover. Did the cover design get changed?

    Michael Greene - Reply

    Hi Michael, perhaps something is preventing the screws from catching the thread - see if the cover goes all the way in.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Hi Filip. No, the 10mm screws don’t clear the cover itself. I tried clearing any possible blockage inside the screw hole by using a longer screw and bolting it down to crush anything that might have been inside but there wasn’t anything. Luckily, I had two 12mm screws that worked fine.

    Michael Greene - Reply

    mine seems to just clip/pop onto the cylinders and screws of any kind don’t find a thread

    Ken Hilton - Reply

  28. Now it is time for the final check of the power cables. Make sure you've connected the correct polarity and tightened the screws properly. Note that the PSU and Einsy board have different order of the polarities, ALWAYS look for the + / - signs! Red wire  - positive polarity (+)
    • Now it is time for the final check of the power cables. Make sure you've connected the correct polarity and tightened the screws properly.

    • Note that the PSU and Einsy board have different order of the polarities, ALWAYS look for the + / - signs!

    • Red wire - positive polarity (+)

    • Black wire - negative polarity (-)

    • Slide the cover on the cables from the top. Make sure the "PRUSA" logo is facing up.

    • Secure the cover using two M3x10 screws. Note that the holes are quite deep.

    The third picture shows the Z-axis Right cables on the other side of the main frame, but Step 15 said that I was supposed to pass the cables under the frame and zip tie them. Now these Z-axis cables are interfering with the application of the cover. Was I supposed to do something more with this Z-axis cable bundle?

    Bryan W - Reply

    Hi Bryan, you don’t need to do anything else other than in Step 15.

    This picture was taken after the original manual was created, perhaps the motor cable was disconnected during photo session.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    STEP

    Secure the cover using two M3x10 screws. Note that the holes are quite deep.

    PROBLEM

    The M3x10 screw was too short. Couldn’t even get a single thread exposed.

    SOLUTION

    1. Open the spare parts bag

    2. Use the spare M3x14 screws. I don’t know how deep the receiving nut is so just tighten slowly and make sure you don’t get this far and crack a plastic piece.

    Ron - Reply

    Actually, I had the same problem but figured it out:

    The threaded holes on the PSU go INSIDE THE COVER. This means that M3x10 will arrive flush with the cover end but you’ll notice the hole at the end is bigger than the screw. I found it easier to tile the machine with the PSU up so properly align the cover.

    Max -

    I had the same problem as Bryan. Step 15 shows the Z-axis motor cable routed under the zip tie, up the back side of the vertical frame part & then into the cable bundle. But there is no way to then fit the PSU cover in place as the cable gets in the way & there is not enough slack in the cable bundle to move the Z-axis motor cable. It’s not clear from these instructions whether the Z-axis motor cable should go up & come down through the opening of the PSU cover with the power cables, or whether Z-axis motor cable should go under the PSU cover & then join the power cables once they’ve emerged from the opening of the PSU cover. Either way, additional slack is required & I had to backtrack, cut all of the zip ties & install them again with more slack in the Z-axis motor cable.

    CJ Davies - Reply

    had the same problem as Bryan and Max had the solution. You have to push the cover so deep into the PSU that i makes a little pop and the two screws who are holding the PSU to the short end will “enter” the cover. Then you can use the M3x10 screws. Would mention that as well as being careful when pushing since these are plastic parts.

    Christian Staack - Reply

    One thing that can save some next twisting checking the wires- pick up an inspection mirror from your hardware store.

    Penjim - Reply

    Make sure when you’re screwing these in that you clear the panic cable into the chase where the power cables go! If you are not looking at it from below and just screwing the screws in by feel, it’s easy to get the panic cable pinched in between the PSU and the cover

    Angus McQuarrie - Reply

    Same issue with the Z-axis Right cables that block the cover.

    My solution was to:

    1. Cut the zip tie.

    2. Place the cover and secure with the 2 M3x10 screws

    3. Place a new zip tie back as it was before step 1.

    Roye - Reply

  29. Identify all motors using the yellow labels and connect them to the board. X-axis motor (already connected)
    • Identify all motors using the yellow labels and connect them to the board.

    • X-axis motor (already connected)

    • Y-axis motor

    • Z-axis motors ( the order doesn't matter)

    • Make sure the lowest connector is free (marked red). The Z axis motors have to be connected at the same level!! It is a common mistake to connect the Z-axis motors under each other.

    • Try to achieve the similar cable arrangement inside the cover to give yourself enough space to work with.

    A little patience and forethought go a long way here in dealing with the excess cable lengths. The motor cables that have extra all seem to fit nicely to the left of the connectors (between the connectors and the frame). Many of the other cables can be looped in the area over the processor, where there aren’t any connectors you will have to try and reach.

    Mark Jurisch - Reply

    More zip tie holes would probably go a long way for ensuring these cables and others fit in a nice out of the way area and stay there.

    Daniel Friesen - Reply

    If, like me, you’re just now noticing that you neglected to connect the X-axis motor to the board already, scroll back to Step 12.

    This mistake wasn’t too difficult to fix: I just loosened the screws holding the Einsy-base to the frame, slide the box off, completed Step 12, then re-mounted the box. Just had to be careful about not stretching the connected power cables.

    Ian Dunn - Reply

  30. Find the twisted pair (black and white | PP) cable from PSU and connect it to the board. Press the black&amp;white cable to the left side of the cover. Arrange the cables as in the picture, so you have more space for the upcoming ones. Take the thermistor (green label | HT) from the heatbed and connect it.
    • Find the twisted pair (black and white | PP) cable from PSU and connect it to the board.

    • Press the black&white cable to the left side of the cover. Arrange the cables as in the picture, so you have more space for the upcoming ones.

    • Take the thermistor (green label | HT) from the heatbed and connect it.

    • Thermistor cable can be also in white color and missing the green label. It's polarity doesn't matter, it can be plugged both ways.

    • Try to achieve the similar cable arrangement inside the cover to give yourself enough space to work with.

    My thermistor does have the green label, but is only labeled “H” not “HT”

    Mark Jurisch - Reply

    Hey Mark,

    We sometimes change the labeling, but overall it remains similar.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    these pictures show the old EINSY-case… check the heatbed-cable-entrance

    ludodg@gmail.com - Reply

    Hi, the case version is irrelevant - it’s important to have all the cables installed correctly.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Typo: first purple step says “connected it”, should be “connect it" ;)

    Bob Millen - Reply

    Hello Bob, well spotted, we’ll correct it. Thanks!

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    “Thermistor cable can be also in white color and missing the green label. It's polarity doesn't matter, it can be plugged both ways.” My thermistor cable has a keyed connector on it and can only be plugged in one way.

    skysport@wvi.com - Reply

    Image 3 could be the first to be presented.

    Lucio - Reply

    Very respectfully, there are several problems with these illustrations for someone who has not seen this device before. First, in the first photo it looks like there are two black and white cables. After looking repeatedly, now I assume it is just one wire that loops up, behind some wires, and back down to the connector. Also, the purple arrow just points to a black featureless area. (You must use strong lights when photographing black items so the shadows are more clear.) Image three is great, but it should be the first image.

    thomas king - Reply

    Hello Thomas, the first picture looks good on our end - the purple arrow points to a clearly visible connector. You can always click on the picture to enlarge it. You might also want to increase your monitor’s brightness if the connector is still not visible.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

  31. Find the slot for the NYLON filament, you will need it in the next step.
    • Find the slot for the NYLON filament, you will need it in the next step.

    • Slightly separate the nylon from the rest of the cables. No need to unwrap the sleeve.

    • If the nylon is hidden inside the textile sleeve, use the technique in the next step to reach it.

    Just to clarify, there is a small hole on bottom of the opening where the extruder bundle goes. The arrow is pointing directly at it, just in case anyone had trouble finding it. It’s kind of at an angle and it may be hard to find.

    Michael Pennachio - Reply

    My nylon filament just not long enough, it ends 3-5 cm before the end of the sleeve. I guess I trimmed a too big section...

    What can I do now?

    Dániel Szászi - Reply

    Hi Daniel,

    Is it also too short after twisting the sleeve shown in Step 32?

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

  32. Before we proceed further, we need to twist the textile sleeve. This will prevent the cables inside to slip out during the printing.
    • Before we proceed further, we need to twist the textile sleeve. This will prevent the cables inside to slip out during the printing.

    • Using your fingers gently twist the sleeve (not the cables) and create several wraps.

    • Twisting the sleeve will effectively shorten its length. In the next steps you might need to twist the sleeve slightly back to prolong it.

    For those of you who didn’t know how to twist a cable sleeve:

    1. Hold the cable bundle with one hand

    2. Twist the sleeve counter-clockwise, starting from the extrude and keep working down

    3. Twist again from the extruder if needed

    Miguel Barroso - Reply

    twist direction depends on how you wrapped the bundle

    Joshua -

    Thanks Miguel, very helpful! Perhaps in the next iteration of instructions they should better describe how to ‘twist’ a cable sleeve earlier on in the instructions. I’m sure I’m not the only person out there who has never worked with a cable sleeve like this before.

    Steve - Reply

    Twisting the sleeve will effectively shorten its length. In the next steps you might need to twist the sleeve slightly back to prolong it.

    the bold text “back to prolong it” should become “back in the reverse direction to lengthen the sleeve”.

    Jonathan Lin - Reply

    Yes, or “…slightly back to elongate it”

    Charles Fico -

    This will prevent the cables inside to slip out during the print.

    should be…

    This will prevent the cables inside from slipping out during printing.

    Roger Garrett - Reply

    We will correct this, thank you!

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

  33. Slide the NYLON filament in the hole. Make sure the filament isn't pushing into the motor cables, which would indicate it is too long and you need to slightly unwrap the sleeve and push the filament back. Slide the sleeve in the holder at least 3/4 of the holder's height.
    • Slide the NYLON filament in the hole.

    • Make sure the filament isn't pushing into the motor cables, which would indicate it is too long and you need to slightly unwrap the sleeve and push the filament back.

    • Slide the sleeve in the holder at least 3/4 of the holder's height.

    • Again, ensure the filament isn't pushing the motor cables and if needed slightly unwrap the sleeve and push the filament up.

    • Use the Extruder-cable-clip and two M3x10 screws to fix the cable bundle in place.

    Does the textile sleeve need to be inside the clip? Do you advise twisting the sleeve so it takes up less room? I ended up breaking it because it there was too much of it in there. Zip ties to the rescue!

    Nick Gawel - Reply

    Hi Nick,

    We recommend having it cllipped inside so that it will be held securely. However, it is not absolutely necessary - if you have issues with having it clipped, you can leave it as is. As long as the NYLON filament piece is inside the EINSY cover you will be fine :)

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

    I had a surprisingly difficult time with this step. I think it might have been easier if I’d been using M3x12 screws, as much of the problem was getting the screws to “bite” on each side so they could be evenly tightened.

    Scott Mutton - Reply

    M3*12 also did wonders for me after spending more than half an hour with the M3*10 NO THANKS!

    Belen Hedderich -

    Like Scott’s comment, it was difficult to get the extruded cable clip tight enough to the cable to allow the M3 x 10 screws to bite. I used a couple of M3 x 14 screws from the spares pack, they engaged OK and pulled the clip into place over the cable. I was then able to replace the M3 x 14 screws one at a time with the correct M3 x 10 screws for final tightening.

    John Megarry - Reply

    Using M3 x 14 screws to pull things together before replacing them one-by-one with M3 x 10 screws worked great!

    Jimmy Retzlaff -

    I found that I had slightly too little nylon filament, perhaps because I had to trim it a couple times to get it to anchor in the extruder initially. And I had slightly too much sleeve even after twisting, and then I had to also push it back a little more because the filament was too short to stick out. The bundle being too thick made it hard to get the screws to “bite.” This made the cable bundle too thick, with the extra sleeve prone to bunch up. In the end I trimmed about 1/2 inch of the sleeve. This made a big difference in the bundle width and getting the screws in.

    Laurel W - Reply

    What if my filament is too short? Can I proceed without it?

    Stu - Reply

    Hey Stu, make sure to twist the wrap - it will expose some nylon filament. If it’s not there, then you can still proceed without it, just make sure it won’t damage adjacent wires.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Found this the hardest part of the build! Longer screws would help I think.

    Richard Simpson - Reply

    So what helped met was really twirrling the sleeve up and to gruadually tighten both sides of the screws on the clip rather then just one screw at a time.

    Bryan O'Neil - Reply

    Ideally, one should tighten the M3x10 screws on both sides equally, but you guys knew that already!

    Miguel Barroso - Reply

    This was surprisingly difficult. Like someone else mentioned, it was hard to get the screws to “bite" the nuts for it to screw in. Might help to have slightly longer screws.

    Joel - Reply

    I was able to fit the recommended screw lengths on every part until this one. like others, I am defeated on this step. im using 14s and calling it a day. what the heck, this part is in the back and isn’t seen anyway!

    Alan Ostroff - Reply

    30 minutes of fuddle, no success. Then after cutting of some of the textile I somehow was able to squeeze everything in but now I am not able to close the box-door and will have to cut into the door because now it is blocked by the round thing with the two screws.

    Martin Diering - Reply

    Hey Martin, you might need to slightly bend the top of the door - then it will fit.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    No Filip, the slightly bending of the door will defenitely not change the problem. Contrary to your description in Step 29 the black textile became not shorter, instead it was too long. I had to remove some of it and finish/melt the end with a lighter. Then the combination of textile, nylon and cables was too much. I was not able to fit it proper and easy into the opening as described in Step 30 because the opening is simply too small. Now I squeezed it in and it is not allowing the door to close proper. As you can see in the comments a lot of users have had experienced the same problems as me.

    Martin Diering - Reply

    A simple solution for you guys would be to open the 3d files of the box and the Extruder-cable-clip and then redesign by enlarging the radius of the opening by 1-2 millimeters or so and from tomorrow morning on start to print a more useful version of the box. I do not have the knowledge to do so. Also to use a M3-14 screw instead of the M3-10 could optimize the user experience. Please publish then this version so we can print it too. But I do not have to tell you how to handle these procedures, of cause you know about it much better than me.

    Martin Diering - Reply

    Absolute worst part of the build. This really needs to be fixed to use longer screws.

    Jake H - Reply

    Hello Jake, check if you have twisted the sleeve enough and arranged the cables,doing that should allow you to reach the nut with the screws.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Seconding that this was the worst part of the build. Yes, it technically worked as-displayed, but it requires an unreasonable amount of twisting, an auspicious alignment of the cable tubing where the nylon can escape without bulging, and way, way too much force to get the bolt to meet the nut, especially for a very important assembly made of cheap printed plastic hanging from a metal frame by two bolts. Awful, awful step. Would almost rather spend four hours re-building the extruder assembly than attach this cable bundle again.

    Wesley Boynton - Reply

    Wesley, thanks for your feedback. We’ll try to make it less awful in future upgrades. :)

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    This is the absolute worst. I’ve been trying for an hour to get this to catch. Did you guys even measure this?

    John Dupras - Reply

    Hi John, perhaps one of the nuts hasn’t been pushed all the way in? It’s not that hard to connect those two pieces, you can squeeze them with your fingers if they are too far away from each other.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Interestingly, I received two heatbed-cable-clips and no extruder-cable-clip. Looks like I know what I’m printing first! For now, I’ll hold it in place with zipties.

    Jerry Davis - Reply

    Jerry,

    we’re sorry for that! Thanks for letting us know!

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    I ended up using a 14mm screw as well. It’s a real struggle to use a 10mm and get everything aligned so that the threads bite in the square nut without cross-threading

    Mark H - Reply

    Who on Earth thought 10mm long was enough to close the gap after a thick sleeve filled with cables was pushed between?

    For anyone reading, use a longer screw. Save yourself the headache of a 10mm long one.

    Jeffrey Foley - Reply

    I had no issues with this step beyond twisting the bundle wrap tight enough so it fit (along with the nylon filament peeking out) and evenly tightening the screws.

    Joshua - Reply

    This step is ridiculous. The bundle is way too big to comfortably fit into the hole, and as a result, you can’t close it as others have said. In addition, this puts severe strain on the cables and the chances of pinching one or more are very high.

    David Krauss - Reply

    Hi David, try to wrap the textile sleeve mode, and make sure wires are going straight - that way the bundle should be thin enough to insert it without problems.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    I think that some of the problems folks are having on this step is due to the square nuts inserted into the Einsy case in step 10 might have fallen out while doing cable management. Check to make sure the square nuts are still in place before doing this step.

    I might suggest to change the instructions so that the nuts be inserted just before step 33

    Steve Gowin - Reply

    This was the absolute hardest step for me. The instructions don’t really say how big of a loop to leave for wires and as it turns out I made my loop too big and I had to take the hotend assembly back off and adjust the wires. Maybe they are there and I just did not see them, but when instructing us to leave a loop of wire or slack, maybe use cm or mm length.

    Bryan Price - Reply

    Hi Bryan, there are pictures that tell you how a perfect loop would like during the extruder assembly.

    It’s best to double check pictures and descriptions when following the manual.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    I found this part fiddly, but not too bad. Here are things that helped me:

    1) Cut the end of the nylon filament at an angle so it’s easy to thread into the hole. If it’s too long, don’t trim it yet.

    2) Use the # of wraps to change the length of the sleeve: too long, wrap more times around the wires. Sleeve too short, wrap less. When I was done, my wraps were tight and about 5cm apart. The goal is to have the sleeve just fit into the connector. And if you’ve wrapped tightly the melted edge of the sleeve should be coming in at a diagonal, so the edge is like / instead of __ when it goes through the connector. This reduces bulk.

    3) Start with the M3x10 screws already screwed most of the way into the Extruder cable clip. This gives them space to find the nuts before you start tightening.

    4) As mentioned in a previous comment, tighten both screws evenly.

    5) Trim the nylon filament if needed. Use a good set of wire cutters, and be INSANELY careful not to cut anything else in there.

    Syne - Reply

    Yea my Filament is like 5 inches too short..

    Ed Sinigur - Reply

    I also had a struggle getting those screws to bite. Slightly longer would make things easier.

    eman - Reply

    This makes things a bit easier:

    1) Take the M3x10 screws and screw both all the way into the cover. Keep turning until you strip out the self tap made: the screws are held in by a nut so stripping the plastic doesn’t matter.

    2) With the extended portion of each screw sticking out hold the cover with you thumb and the other cover on the box with your finger and squeeze with one hand.

    3) Rotate the screws into the nuts and alternate tighten each side a little at a time until flush.

    Joseph Finan - Reply

    Sharpen the end of the nylon just a teeny bit to make it easier to poke into the hole. It’s dark with all this black-on-black.

    Robstar - Reply

    Yes, during this build I have often wished that all of the printed plastic parts were orange instead of just some of them. It would be much easier to see the details, both in the pictures and in the part itself.

    A. Matulich -

    I struggled with this step for a long time. The 14 mm long spares seemed like they may be bottoming out beyond the nut, so I went back to the 10 mm screws, and i used a needlenose plier to GENTLY squeeze the cover against the base and this allowed the screw to reach the nut.

    I actually grabbed the edge of the nut slot with one jaw, and the very edge of the hole where the screw head fits. The needle nose couldn’t really reach the side closer to the frame, but I was able to get that one to grab after the outer one was partially grabbed. DO NOT tighten that first side fully until you get the second screw to grab too.

    BE GENTLE with the pliers or this could easily break something.

    Jeff Roetman - Reply

    ACH! Took LOTS of extra time, making sure to follow instructions, not rush, etc. Got to this step, and I couldn’t get the left screw to catch. Followed the suggestion to use a longer screw first and then sub the 10mm and I cracked the piece along the way. Guess I know what I’ll need to print sooner or later!

    Laurie S - Reply

    I didn’t have as much trouble as some others, but I had to clip the nylon filament so it wouldn’t press into the motor cables. Still not really sure what the nylon is there for... cable bundle stability?

    Andrew Annese - Reply

    Hi Andrew,

    That’s correct, the nylon piece is used for stabilizing the extruder cables bundle.

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

    This was the hardest sub-step in the entire build.

    For this entire section it was best to remove the Entsy-case from the frame and place it on the work bench. This allowed me to see all connections clearly. The hex wrench does fit behind the poser connectors for re-tightening to the frame.

    I used a longer bolt one one side and the large slip joint pliers to squeeze the Extruder-cable-clip into position.

    In any future redesign consider moving the filament slot to the Extruder-cable-clip.

    Al Nettleton - Reply

    Hello, thankd for the suggestion, I will pass it upstream

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    I had no problem. I’ve done this several times on my original mk3, and this was much easier (before I think it was a zip tie).

    Twisting the sleeve as directed exposed the nylon filament. It slid in just fine. I screwed the m3x10 into the extruder-cable-clip so they were fully sticking out. I had to squeeze a bit, but they caught on both sides and tightened down. From all the comments above, it sounds like this could be reengineered, but to the Prusa folks: it does work as is, so congrats on the improvements from mk3.

    Paul Meyer - Reply

    Mr Meyer, thank your for your positive feedback and kind words!

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Like many here I found this to be very difficult, my sleeve was bunching up and the screws could not reach the nuts, also I was concerned about breaking the Einsy case because its hard to hold the cable bundle vertical to minimize size while screwing while holding the back of the case to avoid excess pressure.

    Please consider using M3-20’s here and reprinting the case so that they can go through the nuts and right out the back of the half that is printed into the case. That way you could start them with plenty of space, and then as you tightened them (evenly!) you could insure the cables did not get pinched.

    Once reasonably tight, I reached in and pushed the filament back up so that it did not touch the X axis plug and then tightened.

    Chuck - Reply

    need larger screws. Nylon should be checked, if its firmly located. Adjusting screws doesnt guarantee an OK Nylon! This can avoid fires……

    Nahuel Carou - Reply

    Mr Carou,

    Checking the nylon is a good idea. Please rest assured there is zero fire risk with our printers, there is a plethora of safety features in the firmware, plus the PETG used for the plastic parts is a fire-retardant material.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    This worked out fine for me — but it definitely requires some patience. I had to wrap more tightly to expose the nylon, as per the step, and thing fiddle with it a bit to get all the screws to bite. Not tricky — just needs patience :) It all fits and it all works.

    Daniel Klein - Reply

    As with all the previous comments I’d like to add a +1 for this being rather difficult for what I thought would be straight forward. I type with slightly sore fingers and thumbs from squeezing the piece into position so that the 10mm M3 screws could fit.

    I’d suggest a slight larger diameter channel for the cables as it seems pointlessly tight or longer screws.

    Sam Crampton - Reply

    Awful. My screw fell inside the circuit board and I literally can’t get it out.

    Andre Oliveira - Reply

    Easily the most difficult and time consuming part of the build. Longer screws please, I was finally able to use longer screws to hold it at a point where I could then substitute the correct ones. Still required way too much effort. I am impressed that the plastic case did not crack.

    Robert - Reply

    I used these instructions to upgrade the Einsy box on my MK3, and this is a huge improvement over the old box with the spiral wrap. Thank you to everyone at Prusa for redesigning the box and making it so much easier to get the cable bundle in and secured. It’s so unusual these days to buy a product that keeps getting better!

    Jay McGinnis - Reply

    Simply, after a painful nightmare I managed to reach the nuts with the m3 x10 screws.

    Frederico Brandt - Reply

    30min of pain. Absolute worst part of the build. I hate it every time. This really needs to be fixed to use longer screws, zip ties or clear instruction how to do it.

    Tomasz P. - Reply

    I was struggling until I got some longer screws (12mm) and then it went right together.

    Stan Hurd - Reply

    This is by far the hardest step of the entire build.

    Scott Ramirez - Reply

    Agreed that this is the worst part of the build. I fumbled for around a half hour with the 10mm. Switched to 14 and still struggled! But finally got it.

    Kelly Nicholes - Reply

    Yeah, maybe Prusa can put a small packet of moisturizing lotion to sooth everyones delicate impatient fingers for this step!:) Seriously, go slow and follow the directions EXACTLY and this step will turn out just fine.

    Ron Hatters - Reply

    Hey Ron,

    Good idea, maybe we’ll look into it. :)

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    This step is quite easy with channel-lock piers to squeeze the sleeve holder together while tightening the screws. You don’t need to start with longer screws if you can get a good squeeze on the holder. It also helps to have a kid along to lend a hand. I squeezed with the pliers, and after my son got the screw threads to bite, I could let go and he tightened the screws the rest of the way.

    While the channel-locks made this step easy, without some sort of additional help (an extra tool, or longer screws, or an extra person), this step would be incredibly difficult. The end of this step should instruct the reader to eat one more Haribo as a reward!

    A. Matulich - Reply

    I didn’t have much problem with this step other than the nylon filament being too long. I tried unwrapping the sleeve and pushing it back in, but it still hit the motor cables. I carefully snipped 1 cm of the nylon filament and it fit nicely. No problem getting the M3x10 screws in.

    George Bell - Reply

    I was able to get it in but black on black on black is really cruel to those of us with antique eyes.

    Ronald Smith - Reply

    Because the wrap and the cables inside the wrap was a real too large to fit easily inside the clamp. I used the pliers and smashed the cover together and threaded a side, moved the pliers over a bit and threaded the other side. I still clamped down on the pieces as I tightened each side a few turns at a time until the bolts were all the way in. Yep toughest task so far.

    Michael Thompson - Reply

    Finally got it. There's a special place in heII for the person who designed this.

    David Grant - Reply

    Well, I had no trouble with this step, and so now I’m wondering if I did it wrong :)

    Aaron - Reply

  34. IMPORTANT: Connecting the filament sensor cable properly is crucial. If you don't follow the instructions properly, you will burn the sensor!!! DON'T CONNECT THE CABLE NOW, wait for the next step!!! To ensure the cable is connected properly we are introducing a new part called &quot;plug-aligner&quot;, which is now distributed with all MK3S printers leaving the factory.
    • IMPORTANT: Connecting the filament sensor cable properly is crucial. If you don't follow the instructions properly, you will burn the sensor!!!

    • DON'T CONNECT THE CABLE NOW, wait for the next step!!!

    • To ensure the cable is connected properly we are introducing a new part called "plug-aligner", which is now distributed with all MK3S printers leaving the factory.

    • In case the plug-aligner falls out during the transport, gently push it back in. The notch should be oriented up, like in the picture.

    • There are two rows of pins in the connector:

    • Lower row (for MK3S) use these pins to connect the IR-sensor.

    • Upper row (for MMU2S) these pins won't be used in this manual.

    • STL file for the plug-aligner is available in the MK3S package at prusa3d.com/prusa-i3-printable-parts/

    So if this happens to you, check your filament sensor plug: https://shop.prusa3d.com/forum/assembly-...

    Craig Paterson - Reply

    Just to save others some reading, if you go through calibration successfully but then go to print and the printer continually asks you to unload the filament, you have the sensor plugged into the wrong row.

    Mark Jurisch -

    (That link is broken)

    Douglas Howard -

    So I completed assembly and the sensor dosen’t seem to work. I have checked the wire and it is connected right whet else could be wrong?

    Toby Bauer -

    Hi Toby, please make sure you have installed the correct firmware (MK3S uses a different firmware than MK3).

    If that isn’t the case, then please contact our customer support via email: info@prusa3d.com or livechat: https://shop.prusa3d.com/

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    I didn’t notice any plug-aligner on my Einsey. Sadly, given this is my first printer, I cannot print a replacement…

    Samuel Farinas - Reply

    Hello, are you sure it didn’t just fall behind something? It is this tiny orange rectangle. But if you don’t have it, no worries. It is not indispensable, just make sure you are plugging the cables exactly as shown on the photos.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Some tiny hair-like thin filament are inside the "plug-aligner". Do we have to get rid of all those tiny hair-like filament before inserting the IR sensor wire? I have built some PC before. We shouldn’t leave any foreign materials in the PCIe slots as this could damage the components or cause fire hazard. For this controller board, do we need to worry about it?

    pcprusa - Reply

    Hi,

    In case of any printed parts, it’s always best to inspect them and clear any possible strands/extra material before continuing with assembly, especially with parts for the IR sensor assembly.

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

    There are many of those “hairs” inside the plug aligner. Mine came with it pre-installed and I cannot remove it. What should I do?

    Eduard Barraza - Reply

    Hi Eduard,

    The aligner is not mounted permanently, you can grab the top part of it with pliers and pull it out. If it came with thin strands of filament around on it, you can give it a quick flash (half a second) with a lighter to melt them.

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS - Reply

  35. Connect the remaining cables from the Extruder: Extruder heater (red cable pair | Nr. 1)
    • Connect the remaining cables from the Extruder:

    • Extruder heater (red cable pair | Nr. 1)

    • Hotend fan (black cable | Nr .2)

    • Print fan (red label | Nr. 3)

    • IR-sensor with two wires facing to the right (Nr. 4) !!! USE THE BOTTOM ROW, leave the upper row free!!!

    • Extruder motor (yellow label with "E" | Nr. 5)

    • Extruder thermistor (green/yellow label | Nr. 6)

    • P.I.N.D.A. probe cable (Nr. 7)

    The first photo is very confusing. The yellow arrow for the Extruder thermistor seems to point to an area where there is no connector. The second photo shows the location of the empty Extruder thermistor connector, but the wire colors for the Extruder thermistor on my machine (MK3S) are totally different to those shown in the first photo - mine are red and black, with a short bit of yellow and green heat shrink on the end.

    David Maher - Reply

    Hey David,

    The arrows do not indicate connectors, but wires. The wire color might have changed at some point.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    I think because of the prespective of the photo and because the depth of the connector is obscuring the contact point, is seems the IR sensor is plugged in the top row in Photo 1 which would be incorrect.

    Deanb - Reply

    Hey Dean, thanks for pointing that out. We’ll fix it :)

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    21 JUNE 2019 IR sensor connector photo still shows connection to upper pins. Should be plugged into the lower set of pins.

    Miles Odonnol -

    If you can’t change the picture quickly, it should be noted in the caption that the picture is incorrect. That’s an easy quick fix.

    J. Walter Hawkes -

    The thing is, the picture IS correct (and so are the instructions, written in bold capital letters, with 6 exclamation points). It just may seem to someone, supposedly because of the perspective, that the cable is plugged into the top row, even though, if it was the case, you would see the bottom row of pins, which you don’t.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Just finished my printer only to find out that the filament sensor was not working. A bit of troubleshooting on reddit and I was pointed to the right direction that the IR cable is probably not connected right.. so I checked everything and YES, I plugged the cable to the top row not the bottom because of the first picture in this step looks like the IR cable is plugged into the TOP row and not the bottom. Yes I know, it is written there in CAPITALS, but somehow this is the only mistake I made… might be worth uploading a better picture where cable connected to the bottom row is more clear.

    killer@ultranet.sk - Reply

    Hi,

    We’ll try to make it even more clear where the sensor connector should be placed - thanks for the feedback.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    7 months later, the picture does not show the top row of pins. I could take a pic of mine clearly showing the top row of pins, you could switch it out, for a slight royalty fee. This would support printing research.

    Ronald Smith -

    If I need to disconnect the extruder heater wires, can I just pull them out? Or do I need to disengage some retention feature first?

    Adam Kowal - Reply

    Hi,

    You should be able to pull them out without having to press any notches.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    IF YOU HAVE THE ORANGE PLUG-ALIGNER, PLEASE READ!

    I *thought* when reading about this plug aligner that it addressed the issue of plugging in the filament sensor to the wrong row of pins. IT DOES NOT. I thought that all the comments about plugging in to the wrong row of pins didn’t apply because I had the orange plug aligner. I was wrong.

    You * have* to ensure you are plugging in the sensor to the correct row of pins.

    This was actually the only mistake I made, aside from putting the spool holder on backward. Yay me.

    Stephen Cooper - Reply

    Stephen,

    that’s correct. The aligner only prevents you from plugging the cable one pin to the right/left (which was happening a lot, surprisingly).

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    It would help if you mention which row is the correct row instead of just saying to plug them into the correct row.

    The CORRECT ROW is the BOTTOM ROW of pins.

    Sean Tobin -

    I can see the Plug Aligner is helping a little bit to hide the fact that you’re using the wrong connector for the socket. Can you change the orange bit so that it blanks off the pins that should not be used or better still fit the orange bit to the sensor plug to create a keyed plug that will correctly fit the socket.

    In a perfect world I’d expect the sensor to be fitted with the correct plug for the socket but I also understand that might not be possible or require rework at Prusa.

    Mark H - Reply

    Hello Mark,

    we were obviously thinking about this, but the socket, the cable connector and thus even the Plug Aligner has to be universal and upgradable, Also the upper row of the pins is used for the MMU2S data cable, so that’s why it’s not covered.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Color=coded sockets would help.

    Preston L. Bannister - Reply

    Hello Preston,

    That is a nice idea, but problematic to implement. Color coding sockets is not a popular practice, as sockets are most often either black/white, and even with that considered, it would take too much time for the production to manually customize them just for that purpose, as we get the boards straight from Ultimachine. The current setup is clear already :)

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

    I put everything together to this point, knowing that you sent me two Y motors, but thinking that they were the same motor as all the others, so it wouldn't matter, only to realize now, that the wiring harness was to short.

    Keith Rogers - Reply

    IR Sensor… As others have done, I thought the orange adapter made it impossible to plug onto the wrong connectors.

    So I followed the picture - and wound up on the top connectors. Is there anything on that connector that will damage the sensor?

    When I changed from top row to bottom row, sensor went from solid 0 to solid 1. Still not working - but different.

    If my sensor is still OK - now I need to check the flag. Prints OK (well Fantastic) with sensor turned off.

    Robert Mitchell - Reply

    If you plug it to the upper row, it might get damaged, but sometimes customers are lucky and it survives. It is clucial to actually read and follow the instrictions.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Along with making sure to connect the IR-Sensor to the bottom row, I found out the hard way that orientation of the pins matters as well. Make sure the 2 wires are facing to the RIGHT side and the single wire is on the LEFT side. It’s stated in the instructions but I was too focused on top and bottom, I plugged it in upside-down (still on the bottom row however). Found out there was a problem during my first print but it seems OK now.

    Andrew Annese - Reply

    This step is disaster. The assembly to this stage is perfect. Parts are accurate, well described and identified.

    The wiring loom to the motherboard has no numbers on the leads at the motherboard plus the wire colours are different to the printed booklet and the online photographs.

    Jeffrey Nuske - Reply

    I was confused by the fact that the “IR-sensor” is sometimes referred to as the “Filament Sensor” (photo in step 37, as well as caution bullet point). It would be helpful to point this out, such as “IR-sensor (Filament sensor) with two wires facing to the right (Nr. 4)”.

    George Bell - Reply

    Hi George.

    Thank you for your feedback. Will be fixed. :)

    Vojta Z. -

    Having those little plastic colored, lettered, bands on some of the cables really helped. But why aren’t they used on EVERY cable?

    Roger Garrett - Reply

  36. LCD cable with ONE stripe (Connector P1) LCD cable with TWO stripes (Connector P2)
    • LCD cable with ONE stripe (Connector P1)

    • LCD cable with TWO stripes (Connector P2)

    • The pink stripe on the LCD cables should be facing upwards.

    i think its easier to place P2 before P1. I would reverse the order in the instructions. not a big deal though.

    dito milian - Reply

    Hello,

    There is no mention of order in which you should plug in the cables here, you can plug them however you like :)

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

    I actually managed to swap the LCD cables that connect to P1 and P2. If you do that the LCD lights up, flickers and then the printer appears to cut power and boot up again over and over.

    Luckily it did not harm the printer ;-)

    Christoph - Reply

    Hi,

    Of interest why does the borard version keep swapping between 0.5c (step 29) and 1.1b (step 34) then back to 0.5c (this step)

    Is there much difference between versions, and is it worth swapping to the later version?

    (I have just done the upgrade from a MK3 to MK3s)

    Kim Ferady - Reply

    Hello Kim,

    Some of the pictures are reused from previous versions of the manuals. The latest board version that we use now is 1.1b.

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

    In the instructions, please specify that the stripes being referred to are the small ones near the plugs. If you are going to put multiple stripes on the cables, expect confusion.

    Lessian - Reply

    Hello Lessian,

    Please see the photos (namely the second one) to avoid any confusion.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

  37. Check your electronics connection with the attached picture. Make sure once more the Filament sensor cable is connected to all pins! Misalignment might lead to permanently damaging the sensor.
    • Check your electronics connection with the attached picture.

    • Make sure once more the Filament sensor cable is connected to all pins! Misalignment might lead to permanently damaging the sensor.

    I don’t see any instructions on how to clean up all of the harnesses inside Einsy-door.

    I just gently tied up all of the wires in several places but I would have preferred a little guidance.

    I don’t see anything after Step 30, on what to do to tie it up so it doesn’t interfere with the moving heatbed.

    John Merling - Reply

    Hey John,

    The cable management guides are coming, but it’s totally OK to leave it as it it now.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    I agree John, I get the impression that they have become a bit busy, so they assume that we’ll get the idea and look after the rest ourselves.

    David Maher - Reply

    Some wires are too long which leaves too much extra to try to hide inside the PCB enclosure. It is hard to close the PCB enclosure door with so much extra wire.

    Miguel Rodriguez - Reply

    You can try pushing them more inside, they will be perfectly fine that way.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Yeah, and how is a Raspberry Pi Zero W ever supposed to fit inside there?

    Sean Tobin -

    The pi zero is mounted on the other side of the board.

    Joshua -

    I suggest making the guides of the einsy base semi-spherical instead of sharper cone shaped. That way, if a wire (or ribbon cable) gets accidentally pinched, it won’t be really crimped.

    Miguel Rodriguez - Reply

    Hi Miguel, thanks for your suggestion, we’ll check if this is a better solution.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    The circuit board has the letters PWR IN, BED IN, BED OUT next to the 3 bottom connections (see rightmost picture at step 31).

    But it seems both PWR IN and BED IN should be connected to power (PSU), while only BED OUT is connected to the bed.

    Also, is it possible to make the logic cabinet (EINSI) bigger (wider) in order to more easily house the excess cables?

    jaapmsier@gmail.com - Reply

    Hi,

    Make sure to follow the manual and pictures in it when connecting everything.

    Our part files are open-source, so you can always modify them if you wish. There are also modified designs available on the internet.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    For me, all the cable-labels for “X”, “Y”, “Z”, “E” faced towards the frame, not towards the centre of the circuit board as in the picture. They don’t look like they’re easily rotated, so you might want to mention to the fabrication people that there’s a preferred orientation of these labels.

    Scott Mutton - Reply

    +1 same here

    Valentin Chernaev -

    in the version i received, the labels are rubber and are reasonably easy to swivel around the cable

    Robstar -

    After connecting the LCD cables I notice that when I move the heat plate the LCD can light up (no power applied). This means that the Y motor is pumping in enough voltage back into the circuits to bring up the VDD. This makes me think the motor is not (electrically) isolated enough from the digital. Did I forget something or hook up something incorrectly?

    Stephen M Meckley - Reply

    Hello Steven,

    This is perfectly normal, all of our printers do that, there is no need to worry. :)

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Just to tell @prusa Team:

    The whole Filament Sensor part is pretty confusing following the paper manual, since the picture of Step 31 clearly shows the Sensor plugged into the upper row and not the lower row. On the rest of pictures its also not very clearly visible.

    Benjamin - Reply

    Dear Benjamin, thanks for the remark.

    A new version of the printed manual is in the works. We also highly recommend referring to this online version, as it’s obviously more easily kept up-to-date.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    In the second image I believe that the fuses are labeled incorrectly.

    With the top fuse removed the Fans and Thermistors still have power.

    If the Einsy Rambo is exactly the same as the GitHub project by UltiMachine, then the Top Fuse is only driving the Hotend, while the Bottom Fuse drives the Motors, Thermistors, Fans and Logic

    Adam Coulson - Reply

    I think the position of the filament sensor connector may be wrong in the photo with wires connected. Shouldn’t the filament sensor be connected to the lower pins? Oh. Maybe that DOES show the lower pins. But it looks like upper.

    Miles Odonnol - Reply

    Hi Miles,

    It’s connected correctly on the photo, you can see some free space above the sensor connector, meaning that it’s plugged in the bottom row.

    Marcin M. - Official Prusa CS -

    Please be consistent. The filament sensor is called an IR sensor in some places, but the documentation and packing slips don’t call it that.

    thomas king - Reply

    Hi Thomas, the IR sensor is also called filament sensor. Both names are interchangeable.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    It’s cable madness inside my Einsy-case. I’ve done a good job at managing cables leading up to this point, as they move under the frame and into the case. In some way, that was to my detriment. By keeping things nice and sparse along the path, much bulk was added at the end. Additionally, the bundle of cables coming from the extruder assembly really took it over the top. Truly, my cup runneth over.

    I highly recommend in future designs for there to be a larger case for the chipset, less excess cabling, or in-case cable management solutions. Or a combination of the three ;)

    Jacob Lamberson - Reply

  38. For this step, please prepare: M3x40 screw (1x)
    • For this step, please prepare:

    • M3x40 screw (1x)

    • Close the Einsy-door.

    • Make sure that no wire is pinched!

    • Tighten the M3x40 screw.

    When closing the einsy door it catches on the extruder and heated bed cable clips and they have to be pushed out of the way, perhaps they could use a fillet or slope to allow the for to close without them getting in the way.

    Daniel Friesen - Reply

    Daniel, I had the same issue with the heat bed clip. I trimmed the bottom and top of it to make it move a bit more freely and beveled the face that meets the einsy door. I was able to pull it closed well thereafter…

    Craig Miller -

    It would be great to have a picture of the “cable management” within the box, or a zoomed-out picture of the bottom.

    Some of my cables have about 6-9 inches of slack in the box. Seems like a lot.

    Chris Bullock - Reply

    Hello Chris, we might update the manual with routing & cable management in the future. It’s not bad if your cables have a bit more slack.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    I connected all the cables, but there is a lot of slack, and I believe the cables will affect the convection air flow (I tried to organise the cables as best as I could).

    Considering the power consumption of the Einsy Rambo, I was wondering if it important to have a good airflow inside the case to dissipate the heat

    Luca - Reply

    Hello Luca,

    No, the cable organisation isn’t all that important. The Rambo does not create too much heat, the perforation in the Rambo casing is enough to dissipate it.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    I can’t close the door. The table heater clamp is blocking the door. If I push the clamp in so that the door closes, the screw hole is misaligned.

    it looks like an arch needs to be cut in the door to accommodate the cable clamp.

    Michael Greene - Reply

    Hello Michael,

    check if you have these clamps installed exactly as shown in the manual. I had this problem too and it was because I turned the clam around.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Hi Martin,

    Yep. You were right. Thanks for the tip!

    Michael

    Michael Greene - Reply

  39. If you've assembled the feet in the second chapter, you can skip this step. Antivibration feet (4x)
    • If you've assembled the feet in the second chapter, you can skip this step.

    • Antivibration feet (4x)

    • Turn the frame on its side and insert the antivibration foot, then rotate with the foot until you squish the rim inside the extrusion.

    • Repeat this process on all 4 feet. Place them 2-3 cm from the end of each extrusion.

    *its

    <3 love you

    Wesley Boynton - Reply

    Hi Wesley, fixed. Thank you :)

    Jakub Dolezal -

  40. For the following steps, please prepare:
    • For the following steps, please prepare:

    • Centre part (1x)

    • Side arm (2x)

  41. Don't use excessive force during the assembly, or you might damage the spool holder locking system. Place all three parts in front of you. Note both &quot;arms&quot; are identical. Make sure the C shaped part, which will snap on the printer's frame is facing towards you. Take the &quot;arm&quot; on the right side, insert it gently in the main part and start to rotate clockwise (away from you). It should take about half the turn to lock the part in place.
    • Don't use excessive force during the assembly, or you might damage the spool holder locking system.

    • Place all three parts in front of you. Note both "arms" are identical. Make sure the C shaped part, which will snap on the printer's frame is facing towards you.

    • Take the "arm" on the right side, insert it gently in the main part and start to rotate clockwise (away from you). It should take about half the turn to lock the part in place.

    • Take the "arm" on the left side, insert it gently in the main part and start to rotate anticlockwise (towards you). It should take about half the turn to lock the part in place.

    • The assembly requires a very small force (torque). If you experience issues, check first the locking mechanism for obstacles.

    i found it easier to do left side first, then right side

    dito milian - Reply

    Thanks. I could not get the left in after right, but when I did as you suggested, it worked fine.

    Laurel W -

    Same here although I do not understand why…

    Morris -

    same. How odd

    Jack -

    In the entire assembly, this is the only step that I had trouble with! Both arms simply don’t fit into the center part. I can add either arm into either slot, but there is just not enough room in the middle for them both to fit. So for now, I’ve just left it as a single spool holder.

    Adam Brill - Reply

    Hey Adam, try cleaning the flash with exacto knife. Perhaps some piece of plastic got stuck there after the injection molding.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Might also consider making sure you are turning each side far enough. My issue was that I wasn’t turning it far enough, which made there not be enough room for the other side.

    Kristian Toole - Reply

    That did it for me! Thanks!

    Jon Scattaregia -

    %#*@ good call, worked for me aswel

    Michiel van Duijn -

    Yes, I had the same peoblem and it took a little more of a turn and then both will fit at once.

    Bernard McIntosh - Reply

    This was admittedly not easy. However, trying to half-way insert both rods simultaneously worked at for me.

    Miguel Barroso - Reply

    I found that by looking inside the tube part of the T-piece, I could see at what angle the one end needed to be turned to make enough room for the other end to fit in there past the edge in the center of the T-part and be able to lock as well. It took more than half a turn to do so, after fiddling with it unsuccessfully at first for a couple of minutes because I was afraid to turn it too far and break it.

    Wilko van den Bergh - Reply

    so, both are “right-hand rule” twists?

    Robstar - Reply

    Hello,

    there is just one way how to lock the arms, so just try it, no need to overthink it :)

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    One side just does not work. Can’e see any obstruction.. Will settle fro one just now.

    Beginner - Reply

    Push it in all the way up to the hub before you turn it. It takes some force.

    Stan Hurd - Reply

    I purchased the upgrade kit and the double spool holder wasn’t included in the kit. I’m not sure if it was suppose to be, or if I needed to print it first.

    Anthony Gideon - Reply

    Hi Anthony, the spoolholder is only part of the mk3s kit or complete printer.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Ok, thanks Filip! Where can I download the STL for the double spool holder? I cannot find it in the Complete or Upgrade kits.

    Anthony Gideon -

    Hi Anthony, you can download the files for the 2 headed spool holder here.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Look closely at the arms before putting them inside. You’ll see there’s a ridge. Look inside the center piece and understand how twisting the piece will move the “slotted-ridge” over the ridge inside the center piece.

    Kelly Nicholes - Reply

    Direction is mis stated. Yes, if you lay the part down as pictured, the arm on the right twists away from you and the one on the left twists toward you…BUT, technically, both sides do twist CLOCKWISE (right hand twist) when you face the direction of insertion (like a screw). if these were screws facing each other, you wouldn’t say one goes in clockwise and the other goes in counterclockwise. Please don’t take offense, this is hands down the best assembly guide I have ever seen. Thank you for the care and hard work that went into it.

    Saumik - Reply

    Hello Saumik, you’re right and you’re welcome :)

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

  42. To properly mount the spool holder, let the &quot;tooth&quot; sit on the frame (in the middle) and then press in the direction of the arrows (push backwards, while slightly pressing downwards). Don't try to assemble spool holder by pushing it only from the top. More force is needed and you may damage the holder. Don't try to assemble spool holder by pushing it only from the top. More force is needed and you may damage the holder.
    • To properly mount the spool holder, let the "tooth" sit on the frame (in the middle) and then press in the direction of the arrows (push backwards, while slightly pressing downwards).

    • Don't try to assemble spool holder by pushing it only from the top. More force is needed and you may damage the holder.

    Got through the buid with no problems until here….snapped the tooth off trying to click it onto the frame… didnt take a large amount of force so be very careful

    Luke - Reply

    The bracket / clip part of mine would not sit down on the frame even before attempting to clip it. Attempting to press it down (while supporting the upper frame so as not to bend it) only chipped off a little of the black paint. After close inspection, the print was slightly off register around the vertical center-line. I had to trim the inside of it with a sharp knife so it would sit completely down on the top bar of the frame before trying to clip it.

    Gary Aitken - Reply

    How do we take it off? I only have one part of it on and want to add the other

    Jamie S - Reply

    Hi Jamie, you need to use a bit of force. But there is no need to remove it to attach the second arm.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    I placed the holder on my car dash, out in the hot sun. Once heated up, it easily snapped on to the frame.

    Rick B

    Rick - Reply

    Is it normal that I can’t use the full build volume if the holder is attached? The X Carriage is to large and would knock on the arm.

    Frank Klötzer - Reply

    Hello Frank, no, the holder should not obstruct the X axis, it’s a tight fit but it still should work even at max height.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Out of all the Prusa printed parts, this is the only one I consider to have a defect. If the top mounting channel does not fit the frame - you will break it trying to install. On mine there was a z axis discontinuity right in the middle of the upper channel, effectively making it more narrow. A file cleaned it up to where the upper channel fits the frame. It was an easy install from there.

    Man this Prusa is a pretty printer…

    Robert Mitchell - Reply

    Is it recommended to put the holder exactly on the middle of the frame? How precise should that be?

    pcprusa - Reply

    Hello,

    Yes, the ideal position is in the middle, but you don’t have to measure it or anything, just snap it on the frame.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Our clip snapped. The mounting plastic should be a little thicker. This is the only thing we had a problem with the entire build.

    David - Reply

    David, sorry to hear that, thanks for your feedback. There are plenty of spool holder designs on prusaprinters.org, so feel free to choose one and print it : )

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    IMO that snapping part is a poor design as you must exert force not knowing how much of it.

    If you push by mistake in the wrong direction you can break something on the spooler, or the printer itself … at a few minutes from being able to use it… :S

    Next iteration you may offer a way to screw it so it’s not an issue anymore !

    Sidney Bo - Reply

    Got mine on. In my opinion, this was much harder then it needed to be. Maybe loosen the tolerance a hair…

    Andre Oliveira - Reply

    Mine broke!!!!!

    Shane - Reply

    Oh no, luckily you can always reprint the holder. Use petg for example, PLA might also work.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Mine would not fit down without a lot of pressure, nor move back into place. After reading these comments I too was afraid to break the final part. As an alternative, I boiled a kettle of water, and pour a small amount (maybe 1/4 cup) over the end that fits into the frame. I then dried it off and tried again. This time it fit into place better and moved back into place with little relative effort.

    Rob Latour - Reply

    This worked for me, thanks!

    Nils K. -

    Boiled a pint of water in the microwave; dipped in the end and it fit!

    Daniel Weitz - Reply

    this clip is really bad. I’ve seen people lift these printers by the spool holder but nothing I do will get the bottom to hold onto anything. if I so much as jostle the spool holder in the wrong direction it pops off

    ROBERT SHELDON - Reply

    Hi Robert, please inspect your spool holder - perhaps the bottom clip was damaged and will break off soon. That might explain why it’s so easy to move.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Although you can kind of tell from the picture, it should really be STATED that the holder clips to the BACK side of the upper horizontal frame, with it tilted away from the front.

    Roger Garrett - Reply