1. Ensure the printer is turned off and not plugged in. While moving with the extruder, the X-axis motor works as a generator. You will create a small amount of electricity and the LCD might flicker. Move with the extruder reasonably slowly and in the future always use the printer's controls. Move the extruder manually all the way to the left.
    • Ensure the printer is turned off and not plugged in.

    • While moving with the extruder, the X-axis motor works as a generator. You will create a small amount of electricity and the LCD might flicker. Move with the extruder reasonably slowly and in the future always use the printer's controls.

    • Move the extruder manually all the way to the left.

    • By rotating BOTH threaded rods at the same time on the Z-axis move the nozzle until you reach the heatbed. Try rotating both the rods equally!

    • Check again from a different angle the nozzle is touching slightly the heatbed. Don't bend the heatbed!

    • Don't place the steel sheet on the heatbed during the entire P.I.N.D.A. probe adjustment process. Wait for the XYZ calibration.

    Shall the nozzle touch the heatbed? When moving it from the right to the centre (step 3), it will potentially scratch the surface. On the third picture it looks like there is a small gap between the nozzle and the heatbed. Seeing this I’m tempted to put a piece of paper under the nozzle while moving it towards the heatbed. To touch it, or not to touch it? That’s the question.

    Felix - Reply

    Hey Felix, there should be a tiny gap in between. There is no need to add paper there.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    The left-most picture above shows the extruder being lowered with the Y-Axis fully forward. The right-most picture shows it lowered with the Y-Axis fully back. This latter configuration worked much better for me as it gets the heat-bed connector out of the way and allows more light in to help judge the gap

    Scott Mutton - Reply

    Additionally, with the Y-Axis (aka the hot bed) fully back you can rest a light-coloured object on the bed (e.g. a folded piece of paper) to create a bright & consistent backdrop against which to more easily see the gap between the nozzle-tip and the bed surface.

    Scott Mutton - Reply

  2. Move the extruder carefully all the way to the right. Make sure that the nozzle is not scratching the surface during the movement! If it does, rise the right side of the X-axis by rotating the right Z motor slightly clockwise.
    • Move the extruder carefully all the way to the right.

    • Make sure that the nozzle is not scratching the surface during the movement! If it does, rise the right side of the X-axis by rotating the right Z motor slightly clockwise.

    • If an adjustment is needed, you can lower the nozzle height by rotating the right Z motor counter-clockwise.

    Sorry I did not bring my crystal ball with today, what nozzle are you referring to ?

    Gavin - Reply

    Hello Gavin, luckily enough, you don’t need it today, as there is only one nozzle: the standard brass 0.4 mm nozzle at the bottom of the hotend. See the red arrow on the second photo.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    Question. When I adjust left side to barely touch and then travel to the right side for same adjustment I find that at the middle point it is now touching just hard enough to start scratching the bed. I am using a sheet of paper to prevent scratching as a precaution but what do you recommend to get things more level?

    Ken.Lotts - Reply

    Maybe I wasn't as accurate as I thought on the sides.. trying again with different results

    Ken.Lotts -

    It looks like my heatbed is not 100 per cent flat. When the nozzle is at the same height on the left- and the right side, it is closer tot the heatbed when I move it to the center.

    Pieter Vermeersch - Reply

  3. Move the extruder to the centre of the X-axis. Take a zip tie from the package and place it under the P.I.N.D.A. sensor. Use the middle part of the zip tie, not the tip. Release the screw holding the P.I.N.D.A. sensor and gently press it against the zip tie.
    • Move the extruder to the centre of the X-axis.

    • Take a zip tie from the package and place it under the P.I.N.D.A. sensor. Use the middle part of the zip tie, not the tip.

    • Release the screw holding the P.I.N.D.A. sensor and gently press it against the zip tie.

    • Tighten the screw on the P.I.N.D.A. holder again.

    • !!! DO NOT use glue to fix P.I.N.D.A. probe in the new type of holder with the M3 screw, you won't be able to release it again !!!

    • A correct height of the P.I.N.D.A. sensor compared to the nozzle should be similar to the last picture.

    The last picture does not say much.

    Are you insinuating the print nozzle should be just touching the bed or should there be some minor clearance ?

    Gavin - Reply

    Hello Gavin, there should be a minor clearance.

    Martin L. - Official Prusa CS -

    So, I can’t seem to move the sensor down closer to the bedplate. The threads are gripping the I.D. of the 3d prined part so much that it will not move, even when i remove the screw and try to pry open the clamp with the small allen wrench. How critical is the distance between the sensor tip and the plate? I would estimate that my sensor is 2-3 zip tie thicknesses between the two… is that close enough?

    paul klevann - Reply

    Hey Paul, you can try pushing the sensor a bit. It’s one of the most important parts of the assembly process - wrong height will not allow you to pass calibration.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Use something to ply open the clamp a bit. I used a small screw driver but if you don't open the clamp, you risk damaging the PINDA probe due to excessive exerted force.

    Miguel Barroso -

    I have tried moving the sensor and pushing on it rather hard, it does not budge. the support arm with the clamp bends when I am pushing on it, I don’t want to break it off. I am trying to get through the inital setup wizard and currently the z-axis adjustment is crashing the nozzle into the bed. I am pretty sure that the problem is my sensor is too high. I guess I just have to keep messing with it to get the sensor lower…

    paul klevann - Reply

    Just a note. I assembled my printer and did this adjustment as it says to. When I turned my Mk3 on and started the axis calibrations it was always failing on calibrating the z-axis (up and down). I checked the P.R.I.N.D.A. again and found it out of place, I reset it, tightened the screw down for the P.R.I.N.D.A. clamp all the way. I started moving the x-axis assembly up manually when I bumped the P.R.I.N.D.A. by accident and saw it was still loose. i could not tighten the clamp enough to get it tight. I wrapped just one layer of a 5mm wide strip of blue tape around the P.R.I.N.D.A. where the clamp goes around it. Re-calibrated it and then was able to tighten it so that it could not move. After that the axis calibrations went on without any problems

    Michael Minden - Reply

    Can you give the PINDA probe clearance in millimeters?

    Miguel Barroso - Reply

    Hi Miguel, there is no definitive clearance. Please use the zip tie provided with the printer to adjust the height - it will always be a little different depending on how far the nozzle is from the bed.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    this should be mentioned a LOT earlier, because there is no mention of how low the PINDA should be relative to the heat nozzle (ie 2mm above?) , I have had to backtrack from 7.17. I am not going to rotate the sensor 15 times with the wire already tightly bound into the textile sleeve. ALSO you should not encourage any tightening of zip ties until all wires are in place and do not require any flex.

    PS need more gummibears

    Jonathan Tall - Reply

    Hey Jonathan, you shouldn’t rotate the PINDA probe - it’s enough to push it downwards.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    If you are having issues moving the PINDA because of the threads, try taking a flat head screwdriver(or small alan wrench) and separating the 3Dprinted part!

    Paul Deutsch - Reply

    I had to use an x-acto knife to literally cut the PINDA clamp into clamp-form. The clamping portion (just beyond where the screw clamps down) actually had no gap — it was solid plastic, a very thin layer. An x-acto knife was just enough to saw away the extra nylon and open the part up, so that it could open wide enough to allow the PINDA probe to move freely without twisting, and allow the clamp to clamp down properly after adjustment.

    Wesley Boynton - Reply

    If your PINDA is too close to the bed, but there is a gap of 1mm or so, try sliding a small piece of paper under it, and then remove the PINDA Clap Screw. You will then need someone to use a small screwdriver to gently ease and hold open the clamp, while at the same time you lift both ends of the paper up to lift the PINDA. Hard to explain, but it worked first time.

    Harvey Kennett - Reply

  4. Please watch our New User Guide before printing: prusa3d.com/new-user-mk3s/

    At this point, I unpacked the silver Filament and am slightly disappointed that its not Prusament.

    Armin - Reply

    Hi,

    The deliverdd filament with the printer/kit is PLA Silver filament 1kg (Plasty Mladeč).

    Martini H. - Official Prusa CS -

    Agree — I would have appreciate receiving Prusament to try.

    Wesley Boynton -

    OK, I got this far I did the PINDA calibration above. Double checked everything was done right. I was started to follow Josef’s beginners video and I wanted to turn on my printer and run through the set up. Only to realize I never got a power cord!! Nope not there. I have looked and looked in everything that came with the printer and it is not there The manual says that the power cord is in the box that it and the power supply comes in. But the power supply was not in a separate box when I got my printer. I do have an extra cord so I am ok. But that is a big thing not to include

    Michael Minden - Reply

    Hey Michael, please contact our tech support - we’ll arrange something for you. Apologies for the missing part.

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

    Oh come on, you included a sample image for this section that looks like an embedded video…that’s a mean prank :P

    Wesley Boynton - Reply

    I started the printer, the LCD lights up, flickers and then the printer appears to cut power and boot up again. What should I check first?

    Christoph - Reply

    Hi, double check the printer connection and cable managment. Please, double check the fuses on the RAMBO board and Power supply - https://help.prusa3d.com/article/TU2ViUJ... .

    In case the problem persists, please contact our customer support - info@prusa3d.com.

    Martini H. - Official Prusa CS -

    OK, I double checked everything and I realized that I had swapped the LCD connectors P1 and P2. Printer boots fine into language selection menu. Hooray, doing the preflight check now.

    Christoph -

  5. Based on the examination of printers received back from the customers, we compiled a list of the most common problems causing poor print quality. Check them out and improve your 3D prints today!
    • Based on the examination of printers received back from the customers, we compiled a list of the most common problems causing poor print quality. Check them out and improve your 3D prints today!

    • Check the video here: https://youtu.be/Lsa-PXAXdKY

    • For other tips and tutorials go to: https://help.prusa3d.com/

  6. See our free 3D Printing Handbook - prusa3d.com/3dhandbookMK3S Read the chapters Disclaimer and Safety instructions
    • See our free 3D Printing Handbook - prusa3d.com/3dhandbookMK3S

    • Read the chapters Disclaimer and Safety instructions

    • Read the chapter Setup before printing.

    • Calibrate the printer by following the chapter Calibration flow and wizard. Please follow the steps exactly, otherwise you can permanently damage the print surface!

    https://www.prusa3d.com/3dhandbookMK3S isn’t working, 404 error.

    Removing the S off of the end does go to the MK3 Handbook.

    John Merling - Reply

    Hi John, thanks for reporting. Will fix it ;) For now you can use: http://prusa3d.com/downloads/manual/prus...

    Jakub Dolezal -

    I found that too, you actually need the last slash and the original link should work.

    https://www.prusa3d.com/3dhandbookMK3S/

    Charlie Miller -

  7. Read the chapter Printing of 3D Printing Handbook.
    • Read the chapter Printing of 3D Printing Handbook.

    • Congratulations! You should be ready to print by now ;-)

    • You can start by printing some of our test objects bundled on the included SD card - you can check them out here prusa3d.com/printable-3d-models

  8. If you encounter any problems at all, don't forget you can always check out our knowledge base at http://help.prusa3d.com. We're adding new topics every day!
    • If you encounter any problems at all, don't forget you can always check out our knowledge base at http://help.prusa3d.com. We're adding new topics every day!

  9. If you need help with the build, check out our forum with great community :-)

    Didn’t fired the printer yet, But I feel the new design is a significant improvement over the MK3 . Cable management is much better, Heatbead strap tentioner is great, head more compact, easier to assemble. Now time to test print. Very pleased so far.

    Marcel Etienne Bergeron - Reply

  10. That's it, the assembly is over. Calibrate the printer according to the Handbook and you are ready to print!
    • That's it, the assembly is over. Calibrate the printer according to the Handbook and you are ready to print!

    • Eat the remaining bunch of bears.

    • We hope, you've enjoyed the build. Don't forget to leave feedback and see you in the next one :)

    I still had some bears left. Will my printer work?

    (oh wait…..I tried it out, it works)

    Daryl - Reply

    Daryl,

    eat all of them as instructed, no exceptions! … :)

    Jakub Dolezal -

    Wow…this was my 1st Ground Zero 3D printer build. Josef’s documentation flat rocks. If I had a thought of a question or concern it was short lived either by the comments in the online Doc or a quick search in the forum…Nice job Prusa

    Clayton Baker - Reply

    Hi Clayton, thanks for the feedback. I'm glad to hear the build went smooth :)

    Jakub Dolezal -

    So, let me start by saying I’m new to 3d printing. It took me two weeks to decide which printer I was getting. Reading, watching movies of printer comparisons I finally decided to go for the Prusa MK3 printer. Pre build or kit was the next question, eventually I decided to go for the kit with the idea that it would give me better insight into the printer. So far I do not regret it, I had fun building it. The supplied manual was probably one of or the best manuals I have ever seen, the comments on the online version are a big plus. Atm I am printing the Benchy…my second print :) …and so far so good. So I wanted to take the time to thank the people who made the manual, great job.

    Kind regards,

    Moris

    Morris - Reply

    Hi Morris, the build should fun and we will do our best to keep it that way :) Enjoy your printer and don't forget to share pics on our forum.

    Jakub Dolezal -

    In addition to my thank-you note at the end of section 8, I just wanted to give a special shout-out to Jakub — I know this manual has been a team effort, but this is some of the best and generally most concise technical writing I’ve ever seen, and I’m very, very picky and snobby. Great job, really. This manual is a shining example of how companies should do business.

    Wesley Boynton - Reply

    Hi Wesley, thank you for your kind words. It takes huge amount of team effort to make the printer easy to build and manual easy to follow. Always several iterations for each part, before we are satisfied with it. Feedback like yours makes it all worth it :)

    Jakub Dolezal -

    I completed my build over a couple of days. The comments posted above were a great help, e.g., finding what seemed like missing screws, using longer screws in some places. The manual overall was very good and having a printed manual enabled an initial read then consult the on-line manual if there looked like “trouble ahead”.

    I’ve printed a couple of sample models using the supplied filament, good filament, but gets expensive when you add postage. Hopefully when production meets current demand this might be stocked on Amazon UK?

    Ernest - Reply

    Hi Ernest, we hope to sell our filament through Amazon UK one day :)

    Filip M - Official Prusa CS -

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Jakub Dolezal

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