Ensure the printer is turned off and not plugged in. Move the extruder manually all the way to the left. By rotating BOTH threaded rods at the same time on the Z-axis move the nozzle until you reach the heatbed. Try rotating both the rods equally!
  • Ensure the printer is turned off and not plugged in.

  • Move the extruder manually all the way to the left.

  • By rotating BOTH threaded rods at the same time on the Z-axis move the nozzle until you reach the heatbed. Try rotating both the rods equally!

  • Check again from a different angle the nozzle is touching slightly the heatbed. Don't bend the heatbed!

  • Don't place the steel sheet on the heatbed during the entire P.I.N.D.A. probe adjustment process. Wait for the XYZ calibration.

I think this step should specify that the Spring Steel Bed should NOT be attached. Thanks!

Ocie Ward - Reply

Hi Ocie, thanks for the suggestion. Until now, there was no indication in the manual to apply the steel sheet. Also in the pictures you can see there is no steel sheet on the heatbed. Follow the calibration process and you will be asked to place the sheet on the heatbed.

Jakub Dolezal -

A good reason to mention the Steel Bed is for when people will refer back to the manual If they need to perform this adjustment again once the printer is assembled or if/when they add on the MMU. People will not go through the entire manual to look up one section about adjustment procedures.

James Slater - Reply

Hi James, description updated. Thanks

Jakub Dolezal -

Perhaps first add: Ensure the Pinda probe is above the nozzle level (loosen the screw if necessary) - we will make the final adjustment later.

Andreas Sjolund - Reply

Yes, that is needed indeed.

Levent Alpsal -

Andreas, good point. Thanks ;)

Jakub Dolezal -

All of the suggestions should be added. I bought my Prusa assembled, but my Z is off after doing a firmware update. So don’t assume someone read the pages before this one as I was directed to this page to determine the PINDA adjustment. I wasn’t directed to read the chapter before this.

greg mesh - Reply

If you place a piece of paper under the nozzle and adjust the height until the paper is held with some friction, you then know the nozzle is touching the paper and bed. Then adjust the Pinda probe, also using the paper. The important measurement is nozzle height to Pinda height, so the paper does not affect this.

Howard Watkins - Reply

When I move my X axis to the left, the LCD screen starts flickering, with no power cable connected. I’m assuming the X axis motor is backfeeding power when you manually move the extruder because it’s acting like a generator. Is this normal / expected?

Nadim Nakhleh - Reply

Hi Nadim, yes you turn the motor into a generator. Move it slowly and nothing will happen.

Jakub Dolezal -

Same observation as Nadim. Both the X-axis and the Y-axis generate enough voltage to lit up the LCD screen. A warning should be added, if a quick move can generate enough voltage to damage the electronics.

Nikolaos Tsarmpopoulos - Reply

Hi Nikolaos, warning will be added, but if you proceed according to the instructions, no damage will occur.

Jakub Dolezal -

Move the extruder carefully all the way to the right. Make sure that the nozzle is not scratching the surface during the movement! If it does, rise the right side of the X-axis by rotating the right Z motor slightly clockwise.
  • Move the extruder carefully all the way to the right.

  • Make sure that the nozzle is not scratching the surface during the movement! If it does, rise the right side of the X-axis by rotating the right Z motor slightly clockwise.

  • If an adjustment is needed, you can lower the nozzle height by rotating the right Z motor counter-clockwise.

Why not use a piece of printer paper under the nozzle (and the zip tie later)? When you move the nozzle in X it should be low enough to drag the paper along but you should be able to hold it in place without the nozzle making marks or tearing the paper.

Hans Nygaard - Reply

Hi Hans, for this step you need to ensure the X-axis is levelled. That is why you’re asked to check the distance nozzle-heatbed on both edges of the heatbed. Paper can be used, but it is an extra, you will be ok without it for now.

Jakub Dolezal -

One way to make sure you’re not scratching the bed is to slightly lift the right side by rotating the leadscrew back a bit. Then move the extruder to the right side and lower it until it touches the bed. Then start moving horizontally. My opinion is that this step should be designed in such a way to avoid this eye-balling the nozzle touching the bed… that’s not a very precise way to it.

Florian Ford - Reply

manually moving the extruder via x or y moderately fast is causing the lcd to flicker

Andrew Dalton - Reply

Same, here LCD flickers…perhaps it’s ok?

Jay Collett - Reply

Move the extruder to the centre of the X-axis. Take a zip tie from the package and place it under the P.I.N.D.A. sensor. Use the middle part of the zip tie, not the tip. Release the screw holding the P.I.N.D.A. sensor and gently press it against the zip tie.
  • Move the extruder to the centre of the X-axis.

  • Take a zip tie from the package and place it under the P.I.N.D.A. sensor. Use the middle part of the zip tie, not the tip.

  • Release the screw holding the P.I.N.D.A. sensor and gently press it against the zip tie.

  • Tighten the screw on the P.I.N.D.A. holder again.

  • !!! DO NOT use glue to fix P.I.N.D.A. probe in the new type of holder with the M3 screw, you won't be able to release it again !!!

  • A correct height of the P.I.N.D.A. sensor compared to the nozzle should be similar to the last picture.

There are no zip ties in the spare parts package. But there are plenty left in the zip tie bag, so i used one of them.

Michael Stegen - Reply

Hi Michael, step description updated ;)

Jakub Dolezal -

I actually damaged my PEI surface on my mk2s build because of this recommendation to use a zip tie as a spacer/measuring tool. The same won't happen here since you do the initial calibration without the steel sheet installed (could be worse here if you did manage to crash the nozzle into the pcb though), but I would still suggest going by the 3rd image showing a front perspective of the relative gaps and just setting the position visually.

Steven Underwood - Reply

Always err on the side of caution. ITs better to have the pinda closer to the bed than higher. Too high, it will crash into the bed and ruin your day. You can always easy up on it later if you have to use a lot of negative Live Z adjustment to get your filament to stick.

Joe Bruno - Reply

On my Mk2, I measured the Zip tie and came up with 0.975mm when the recommended height was 1.2mm. Because of a slight bed warping, that caused my first print calibration to continually fail, I backed off the height over that point (right rear) to 1.0 mm and I was able to calibrate and print.

James Slater - Reply

How hard I need to turn the points screw? I did not tighten it to hard but the plastic holder banded and I’m afraid it will break in future.

יוסי שלי - Reply

Hi, the screw should be tightened so the probe doesn’t move. No need to overtighten the screw as you might break the printed part.

Jakub Dolezal -

So, now that the P.I.N.D.A. is set to the correct hight, what is next exactly? Should the Z-axis be moved up again or can the selftest be started with the Z-axis in the lowest position? Perhaps it should actually be in this position for the selftest to work? Missing a bit of detail here I’m afraid.

Jeroen - Reply

Hi Jeroen, regarding the next step, see the video (Step 4) and follow the 3D Handbook. As for now there is no need to adjust the Z-axis manually ;)

Jakub Dolezal -

I used one of the pieces of excess length trimmed from a zip tie.

Bruce Moore - Reply

Are we to assume that the nozzle is touching the pcb during this step or is it just slightly above? Could we do the step of pinda probe height with a piece of paper underneath to protect the nozzle/pcb from getting damaged?

Since the paper would go under both the pinda and the nozzle it wouldn’t affect the adjustment.

Matty vee - Reply

Hmmm… I have the spring steel sheet that magnetically attaches to the heated bed. Don’t you need to add that before doing the calibration adjustments??

Mr Cookie - Reply

Hi Mr Cookie, for now please do not use the spring steel sheet, follow the manual ;)

Jakub Dolezal -

Had problems adjusting the P.IN.D.A. It was tight in its holder even with the screw released so I had to twist it so that the threads on its body would lower it. Fortunately I left enough lead free at the P.IN.D.A. end so it was able to coil up as the P.IN.D.A screwed down. If this is a common problem either a reworking on the P.IN.D.A mount’s tolerances or a simpler change the photo of the preliminary positioning of the P.IN.D.A. in section 5 the E-Axis should show the P.IN.D.A. in a lower nominal position.

Martin Wolfe - Reply

I had a simliar issue. the P.I.N.D.A. mount is tight enough that even without the screw I can’t push it down without turning the actual sensor to screw it further in.

Chris Schmitz -

I am amending my previous comment slightly as I had the extruder in the wrong position. However the P.IN.D.A mount / body interface needs to reworked. Perhaps a collet around the P.IN.D.A. so that it can slide up and down freely when the adjustment screw is loosened.

Martin Wolfe - Reply

Instead of this sentence which is vague as to what the last picture is: “A correct height of the P.I.N.D.A. sensor compared to the nozzle should be similar to the last picture. “ Label one of the pictures and call it out specifically” such as “A correct height of the P.I.N.D.A. sensor compared to the nozzle should be similar to the picture ‘Correct PINDA Height’ “

greg mesh - Reply

Hi Greg, “correct PINDA height” is not the same for all printers. This device has certain range of sensitivity and each unit is therefore slightly different. That is why you need to go through calibration process .

Jakub Dolezal -

From my tests it is best to move the nozzle so it almost touches the bed (you can slide thin paper [thinner than normal office paper] under it with some but small resistance), then PINDA sensor should be 11 layers of standard office printer paper (A4 for Laser printers) above the bed. I think that is a bit more accurate than using zip tie method. 10 or 12 layers would also work too. I do not have calipers or dial indicator holder with me to determine the height exactly at the moment.

Witold Baryluk - Reply

The zip tie is about 1.2mm thick. For me to pass calibration (next step), I need to lower the PINDA probe to about 0.65mm (by using 9 sheets of paper) in order for it to properly calibrate .. without doing that the extrusion nozzle was hitting the bed, so you need to get the probe low.

Also at this point I was confused about the metal sheet … this is not used until after initial system checks (fans, hot-end, xyz axis, xyz calibration). It is put on right before the printing of first-layer calibration.

Gerry P - Reply

I had to lower the pinda beyond zip tie thickness as well. Nozzle crashed into the bed during calibration.

Vince - Reply

PINDA isn’t moving the slightest bit with completely los screw and holder.. No idea how to proceed here. Also how am I going to place the steel sheet back in as the next step (calibration of Z axis) asks me to to, while the nozzle is still touching the heated bed?

Lennart - Reply

I put in a screw driver to force open the clamp then it went down. still problems getting to engage at 1.2mm so per text above placed it slightly lower.

vincent bartlett -

Please watch our New User Guide before printing. http://www.prusa3d.com/buildvideoMK3

While we’re waiting for the video to be available, maybe add a step that says, in text, “1) plug in your printer 2) select language 3) run the calibration wizard”

Zaz - Reply

Hi Zaz, video is almost finished. Joe will take you through the new features and first run including calibration using Wizard.

Jakub Dolezal -

I’m not sure where to add this, as it came up during the self-test during the pre-flight test. I managed to not connect (or dis-connect) the Extruder moter inside the EINSY box. The self-test didn’t catch it, and I was confused when the extruder wouldn’t function when loading the filament.

Additionally, I think the filament sensor was off by default. Might want to mention that or switch it on by default.

Joey Gil - Reply

You definitely have to add a note to attach the steel plate onto the heat bed before running the self test. Add this note in the manual AS WELL as in the firmware of the prusa to show up on the lcd! The z axis in the self test never worked correctly without the plate!

Do Not Print - Reply

See our free 3D Printing Handbook - https://www.prusa3d.com/3dhandbookMK3 Read the chapters 3.2 Disclaimer and 3.3 Safety instructions
  • See our free 3D Printing Handbook - https://www.prusa3d.com/3dhandbookMK3

  • Read the chapters 3.2 Disclaimer and 3.3 Safety instructions

  • Read the chapter 6.3 Setup before printing.

  • Download and install the drivers - chapter 9 Printer drivers. Don't forget we have ready to print settings for Slic3r PE.

  • Calibrate the printer by following the chapter 6.3.1 Calibration flow and wizard. Please follow the steps exactly, otherwise you can permanently damage the print surface!

Assuming the PEI sheet goes on before the self test????

Scott - Reply

Hi Scott follow the instructions in the Handbook, you will be asked to place the sheet on the heatbed.

Jakub Dolezal -

The self test should instruct you to add and remove the PEI sheet at the proper moments, and wait for confirmation before proceeding. At least that is what happened on NullZero’s stream.

Zaz - Reply

Hi Zaz, please proceed according to the Handbook and Wizard in the printer’s menu.

Jakub Dolezal -

It said ‘please watch our new user guide‘ the video starts with a self test and does not ensure the plate is attached. Add a question whether the plate is attached in the firmware for the self test as you did in another step later on where the plate should be detached. Also please change self test order to test all static and quick tests at the very beginning ( this could have saved me lots of time during wiring failures of the sensor )

Do Not Print - Reply

Read the chapter 7 Printing of 3D Printing Handbook.
  • Read the chapter 7 Printing of 3D Printing Handbook.

  • Congratulations! You should be ready to print by now ;-)

  • You can start by printing some of our test objects bundled on the included SD card - you can check them out here prusa3d.com/printable-3d-models

Add Comment

If you encounter any problems at all, don't forget you can always check out our knowledge base at http://help.prusa3d.com. We're adding new topics every day!
  • If you encounter any problems at all, don't forget you can always check out our knowledge base at http://help.prusa3d.com. We're adding new topics every day!

Add Comment

If you need help with the build, check out our forum with great community :-)

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Finish Line

156 other people completed this guide.

Jakub Dolezal

Member since: 02/20/2017

72,479 Reputation

132 Guides authored

16 Comments

Thanks so much for the fantastic instructions, they are part of what make the experience top notch!

Steven Underwood - Reply

Hola:

genial la guía!!

Me gusto mucho montar la impresora.

Vi que siempre están superándose y estudiándolo todo a fondo. Seguramente estarán estudiando como mejorar la conducción del cableado. Es lo ultimo que se estudia (pero es que lo demás esta TAN BIEN), pero cuando llegas al cableado empiezas a ver que se aflojo en la terminación.

Felicitaciones y gracias por tanta calidad y esmero

Sebastián González Pacín

sebastián - Reply

Hola Sebastián,

Muchas gracias por tu comentario. Esperamos que disfrutes nuestro producto ;)

Jakub Dolezal -

All in all, I don’t think I would have been able to complete this build without such a great guide. The only thing i could even remotely think of as an improvement would be some other way to distinguish arrows, as some folks who are colorblind may not be able to tell certain colors apart.

Zachary Goyer - Reply

Hi Zachary, thank you for your feedback :) I've already adjusted Chapter 8 to be easier to read in case you can't distinguish between colours. Are there any other parts of the manual, which should be changed as well?

Jakub Dolezal -

Overall, a great guide. Thank you so much to the author for all the time and effort into making it. It must have been a good guide because my MK3 passed all self-tests, is calibrated, and is now printing out a happy little tree frog. All my gummy bears are also gone, so it is time for a beer. Cheers!

Brian Cramer - Reply

Hi Brian, thanks you and I’m glad the guide was helpful during your build. Enjoy the printer ;)

Jakub Dolezal -

As a retired engineer from silicon valley I have NEVER seen or been involved with such a GREAT Manual as with this Printer. Other companies should take your lead. Great Job to all involved.

A few extra parts were acceptable,upgrades and all.

The spare parts bag was a great idea. I am sure it helped many.

The Gummies was a great add as well. The timing was perfect in the beginning chapters, should be added to the rest of the chapters please!

I have only a couple Gummies left after two days working on this project.

Again thanks for caring enough to put this together for us.

and now the adventure begins ……

Thank You

Rich Johnson

Calif. USA

Rich Johnson - Reply

Hi Rich,

it is a great honor for the entire team to hear such words. We are always looking for your feedback to make the whole assembly experience even better ;) I can disclose there will be a new gummy bear per chapter guidance coming soon :D

Jakub Dolezal -

This must be one of the greatest pieces of documentation I’ve ever read. I’m really glad that part of the company’s revenue goes into writting these guides. Congratulations to the author.

Manolis Agkopian - Reply

Hi Manolis, thank you for the feedback. I'm really glad the manual was helpful to you :)

Jakub Dolezal -

I have a background that ranges from an electrician to programmer, to electronic engineer. I have build 4 3D printer kits now including a CR-10, Geeetech PI3 and a hybrid design of my own.

Without a doubt the Mk3 kit was the most enjoyable to build, considering buying another one just for the build. The instructions are extremely well written, comprehensive without being too complex or confusing but thoroughly covering everything.

Quality control was great with only minor issue but I do live on the other side of the world.

The printer worked straight up, no issues and with a print quality the exceeds my expectations. A BIG thank you to Joseph and his team, well done, products to be very proud of. Can’t wait for the MM kit for the Mk3..

:) Richard.

Richard - Reply

Thank you for the hard work put into making this great guide. Had alot of fun upgrading my mk2s. Is there a pdf version of the guide available? My kit lacked printed documentation. I’d like to make a hard copy, just in case :)

Vince - Reply

Great instructions, especially the online version!

The solely reason I needed it though was because some pictures with black printed parts have been to low in contrast to view their details in the printed manual. I suggest artificially enhancing contrast on some images with black or low in contrast parts. (E.g. prusa logo on frame, printed part version mark, and so on)

Do Not Print - Reply

Great guide and the MK3 is so quiet! That in itself is worth the upgrade. The active community here is also tremendous so the guide is always improving. Thanks finally to the support team for quickly replacing the part I broke. The number one suggestion for a short-term improvement would be a better entry point for the extruder cable group into the Rambo cover.

Twerd - Reply

The self test passed and everything seems to be fine up to this point. Questions? What is the needle for?

I was having problems with the first layer being pulled off and becoming a blob around the nozzle. I put some glue on the bed and I am printing my first piece, 50nm tree frog.  Fantastic things that puts PRUSA above other kit suppliers, you do not skimp on the extras like a bag of spare parts, an entire bag of cable ties making it possible to make an error and not having to worry about cutting the tied up wire bundles loose and adding the wire you missed because there are plenty of extras. After screwing the cover closed on the electronics I was able to run a self test and proceed immediately to printing a first layer calibration and after about ten of those I realized what the glue was for. The first layer printed fine but the tree frog kept hopping into a blob around the nozzle. From Kit Box on Friday night to printing a tree frog the following night with very few problem. Box to Frog in a bit over 7 hrs

Ricky Burnett - Reply

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